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The Island of Bicycle Dancers: A Novel ePub download

by Jiro Adachi

  • Author: Jiro Adachi
  • ISBN: 0312312458
  • ISBN13: 978-0312312459
  • ePub: 1337 kb | FB2: 1615 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: United States
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; 1st edition (February 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 224
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 260
  • Format: mbr lit lrf mbr
The Island of Bicycle Dancers: A Novel ePub download

The Island of Bicycle Dancers: A Novel tells the story of Yurika Song, a 20-year old half-Korean Japanese who comes to New York for the summer to learn English

The Island of Bicycle Dancers: A Novel tells the story of Yurika Song, a 20-year old half-Korean Japanese who comes to New York for the summer to learn English. As tends to happen, she finds herself, discovers a few secrets about her family and we're led to believe her actions lead to horrible consequences for the men who cannot get enough of her. The English angle was pretty attractive

A unique take on both coming-of-age stories and immigrant stories, Adachi's novel centers on Yurika Song, a twenty-year-old woman from Japan who is in America for the first time, ostensibly to learn English. An aimless, lazy young woman, Yurika finds herself in New York City with her Korean relatives

The Island of Bicycle Dancers is the coming-of-age-story of twenty-year-old Yurika Song, a Korean-Japanese woman who comes from Japan to New York City for a summer to work with her Korean relatives and improve her English. Yurika's friends back home have always joked that she is chi.

The Island of Bicycle Dancers is the coming-of-age-story of twenty-year-old Yurika Song, a Korean-Japanese woman who comes from Japan to New York City for a summer to work with her Korean relatives and improve her English. But cross-Asian ethnicities turn out to be far less jarring than her introduction to New York life, the world of bicycle messengers and the street culture in which they thrive.

BookDragon Books for the Multi-Culti Reader An entertaining coming-of-age novel-of-sorts about 20-year-old Yurika Song who is half-Japanese and half-Korean, who arrives.

BookDragon Books for the Multi-Culti Reader. The Island of Bicycle Dancers: A Novel by Jiro Adachi. An entertaining coming-of-age novel-of-sorts about 20-year-old Yurika Song who is half-Japanese and half-Korean, who arrives from Japan to work for a summer at her Korean uncle’s store in New York City and finds herself befriended (and more) by a series of bicycle messengers. My Name is Sei Shonagon by Jan Blensdorf. Country of Origin by Don Lee + Author.

The island of bicycle dancers. In fact, the books have little in common. The press release accompanying Jiro Adachi's debut novel, The Island of Bicycle Dancers, claims that just as White Teeth offers "an inspired re-imagining of contemporary London as a vital, thriving, schizophrenic mish-mash of international cultures," Adachi's book captures the vibrancy of New York City. White Teeth unfolds over more than 450 pages and focuses primarily on the lives of two families - one Bangladeshi, the other Jamaican and English.

Jiro Adachi earned his Master of Fine Arts in fiction at Colorado State University and his BA from Columbia University. His novel, The Island of Bicycle Dancers, was published by St. Martin's in 2004.

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Are you sure you want to remove The Island of Bicycle Dancers from your list? The Island of Bicycle Dancers. Published January 13, 2005 by Picador. Japan, New York, New York (. She looked for him-the bike messenger with the splendid caramel-colored skin.

The Island of Bicycle Dancers - Jiro Adachi (2004). Joy Comes in the Morning - Jonathan Rosen (2004). Tabloid City: A Novel - Pete Hamill (2011). The Walls - Jay Fox (2011). The Darlings: A Novel - Cristina Alger (2012). Open City - Teju Cole (2012). Love Monkey - Kyle Smith (2004). The Gods of Gotham - Lyndsay Faye (2012).

Love, sex, death....and English as a foreign language. The Island of Bicycle Dancers is the coming-of-age-story of twenty-year-old Yurika Song, a Korean-Japanese woman who comes from Japan to New York City for a summer to work with her Korean relatives and improve her English. Yurika's friends back home have always joked that she is half-sushi/half-kim-chi. But cross-Asian ethnicities turn out to be far less jarring than her introduction to New York life, the world of bicycle messengers and the street culture in which they thrive.On one level this is a splendid tale of mistaken love-Yurika falls hard for an attractive, but dangerous, Puerto Rican bicycle messenger nicknamed "Bone." But on another, deeper level, our heroine finds freedom in this new language, which to her "is like a huge octopus, very clever and sometimes hard to catch but with so many wild and beautiful writhing limbs."
Nirad
This book was a page turner! I felt immersed in the life story of this young girl. I learned a lot about the Japanese and Korean culture as well as the bike messenger world. This was an informative and enjoyable read. ESL students would benefit so much from this book.
Kazigrel
It was a well crafted narrative. Kept me on edge; a page turner.
Yggfyn
Cool
SoSok
It is said that the best way to really learn a language is through immersion. By relying on the language for your everyday survival, you can completely internalize and understand it, and use idioms and slang. In his novel THE ISLAND OF BICYCLE DANCERS, Jiro Adachi builds on this basic idea and presents a tale not only of language and culture but also of family, friendships, sexuality and self-awareness.
A unique take on both coming-of-age stories and immigrant stories, Adachi's novel centers on Yurika Song, a twenty-year-old woman from Japan who is in America for the first time, ostensibly to learn English. An aimless, lazy young woman, Yurika finds herself in New York City with her Korean relatives. Working at their convenience store under the watchful eye of her resentful aunt, she begins to learn American English from the customers and neighbors she meets every day. She also becomes friends with a group of bicycle messengers who frequent the store; she is fascinated by their slang and attracted to their rebellious lifestyle. As she becomes close with one messenger in particular, she is drawn to another one who she often sees riding by.
Whitey, an eccentric messenger with a smile full of crooked teeth, is immediately smitten by Yurika. She loves his use of language and his openness. They become friends, and Whitey shows her a magical New York City. However, as Whitey's feelings for Yurika grow stronger and stronger, she begins a highly charged affair with Bone, a messenger considered an outsider even within the messenger subculture. As things between Yurika and Bone heat up and tensions arise between them and Whitey, their misunderstood relationship is the catalyst for tragic violence.
Suddenly Yurika's American experience is torn apart at the seams. She must face painful loss amid growing family tensions. Just as she must come to terms with the truth about her relationships with both Whitey and Bone, she must finally confront the truth about her choices in the past and her relationship with her family.
THE ISLAND OF BICYCLE DANCERS is full of interesting and well-written characters. Yurika's culture shock in New York easily could have overtaken the story, but Adachi wisely wrote her emotional growth as the most important component of the story. The book could also have been overcome with details, as there are several interesting story lines --- but again, Adachi controls his story and characters with a seemingly natural ease.
This novel is an enjoyable and unpredictable read. Yurika is surrounded by many teachers who most unwittingly guide her in her transformation from a selfish and unmotivated girl to a thoughtful and driven woman. Her transformation does not happen easily; her maturity and independence are hard-earned. Adachi is successful at blending this realism into a story that is also concerned with the magic and mystery of language.
Written with an uncommon sensitivity, Adachi's debut is all at once about love, friendship, sex, language, family, immigration and growing up. Yurika is a likeable though realistically flawed protagonist, and is a great vehicle for Adachi's intelligent and insightful style.
--- Reviewed by Sarah Rachel Egelman
Marilace
This was such a beautifully told story. It was a great example of the things it described too. It was in some ways like Japanese literature in that it wasn't always about the linear plot, but often more about the language, how the characters were feeling rather than what they were doing, and without a definite "ending" (although it was very unsatisfying that Yuriko never got a bicycle, nor did it explain why she didn't). But it was also very American too, in that there was a lot of action. And the action did drive the narrative in some ways, but more as a framework on which to hang the language of the character's thoughts, feelings and dreams.

It was a novel that straddled both kinds of storytelling, containing a story about people straddling two or more cultures. Beautiful.

For more reviews, please visit my blog, CozyLittleBookJournal.
Gaudiker
The Island of Bicycle Dancers by Jiro Adachi is a beautifully written coming of age story that delves deeply into the cultural mixes that make up Flushing and lower Manhattan's east side. With a pitch perfect cast of characters and a half Korean and half Japanese protagonist, Adachi uses his protagonist, Yurika, as a wonderful lens from which to observe New York City, her family, and the well detailed and nuanced environments of The Lucky
Market where she works and her aunt and uncles home where she lives. As she learns the language we share her frustrations with two cultures that come at life from opposite directions. Observations on how English is spoken - it's physicality and nakedness - are fascinating and help develop a narrative of love and family that moves in surprising and poignant direcctions. This book drew me into the lives of its characters deeply and quickly, and did not let me up for air until I turned the last page.
Adorardana
"Island of Bicycle Dancers" is the coming-of-age story of Yuriko, who was sent to America by her parents in Japan because of all the trouble she was in over there. She lives with her Korean relatives, and she has an antagonistic relationship with her aunt. She secretly begins to learn English, with the help of her cousin, and later a bicycle messenger named Whitey and her uncle's Thai paramour. Yuriko falls hard for the badboy messenger Hector (aka Bone), and this set off a chain of events that ultimately leads to tragedy as someone close is killed as result of Bone's actions. The novel does bring Manhattan to life, and does explore the uneasy relations between Koreans and Japanese, but the relationships don't make sense, and there's a ghost talking to Yuriko after a tragic death.
Imagine going to a country in which you do not speak the language. Your parents have sent you to live with your aunt and uncle to prevent the "bad" influences from your own country from affecting you. When you reach this new country you quickly find the only relief you have from an overbearing aunt is the bicyle messanger gangs that roam through the city and learning the slang language that they speak. Throw in a case of mistaken love, a death of a close friend, learning a new language, and most importantly who you are and you have discovered the beautiful story the The Island of the Bicycle Dancers by Jiro Adachi. I highly recommend this to adults and older teen readers.
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