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LAST COMES THE EGG: A Novel ePub download

by Bruce Duffy

  • Author: Bruce Duffy
  • ISBN: 0684808838
  • ISBN13: 978-0684808833
  • ePub: 1889 kb | FB2: 1495 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: United States
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (January 10, 1997)
  • Pages: 368
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 455
  • Format: doc lrf rtf txt
LAST COMES THE EGG: A Novel ePub download

Last Comes the Egg book. Novel by Bruce Duffy. A story from the eyes of an incredibly perceptive sensitive, but oh-so-real 12 year old boy. Some magic realism of a subtle sort.

Last Comes the Egg book.

In Last Comes the Egg, Duffy manages the incredible. Here is an American novel that brings into uncanny focus the mysteries of life, death and the lunar weirdness of adults - all as seen through the x-ray eyes of a kid. The kid's name is Frank Dougherty, and when he's twelve his extravagant mother fails him in the most profound way possible: she dies. In her wake, she leaves a new T-Bird his family can't afford and a host of troubling questions. Yet perversely, Frank feels more alive than ever. And, in all innocence, he fights back

Bruce Michael Duffy (born June 9, 1951) is an American author.

Bruce Michael Duffy (born June 9, 1951) is an American author. In 1988, Duffy won a Whiting Award and received a Guggenheim Fellowship. Joyce Carol Oates named "The World As I Found It" as one of "five great nonfiction novels," calling the book "a bold and original work of fiction" and "one of the most ambitious first novels ever published" (Salon.

Bruce Duffy's novel ''The World as I Found It,'' published in 1987 . Here, in the section devoted to their flight, ''Last Comes the Egg'' reveals that its true antecedent is the great American novel of adolescence, ''Huckleberry Finn.

Bruce Duffy's novel ''The World as I Found It,'' published in 1987, was one of the more astonishing literary debuts in recent memory.

Duffy also wrote Last Comes the Egg in 1997 (Simon & Schuster). His novel "Disaster Was My God: A Novel of the Outlaw Life of Arthur Rimbaud" was released by Doubleday on July 19, 2011. This piece, Duffy"s second novel, was received with general praise. com praised the novel for its originality and tragic humor. Duffy was born in Washington, District of Columbia, the son of Irish-American parents and lived his entire childhood in Garrett Park, Maryland.

Bruce Duffy is the author of The World As I Found It, a fictional life of Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Last Comes the Eg. Bruce Duffy has once again gone deep and now explores the torturous soul of one of poetry's most enigmatic individuals. Each scene Duffy writes is poetry.

He lives in Bethesda, Maryland.

Bruce Duffy achieved remarkable acclaim for his first book, The World As I Found It, a sweeping novel of ideas centering around the difficult personality of Ludwig. Last Comes the Egg. By Thriftbooks. com User, April 14, 2005. I'm Bruce Duffy's daughter

Bruce Duffy achieved remarkable acclaim for his first book, The World As I Found It, a sweeping novel of ideas centering around the difficult personality of Ludwig. I'm Bruce Duffy's daughter. Many people found this book to be a "dissapointment" and have racial slurs, and just be a "weird" novel. What no one realizes is that although exaggerated, some of these events actually happened. Its such a raw, real book. My Dad wrote something for himself, hes been through so much emotional childhood pain and this book was a release.

Bruce Duffy is the author of the autobiographical novel Last Comes the Egg (1997), and-to appear June 2011- Disaster Was My God, a novel based on the life and work of the poet Arthur Rimbaud

Bruce Duffy is the author of the autobiographical novel Last Comes the Egg (1997), and-to appear June 2011- Disaster Was My God, a novel based on the life and work of the poet Arthur Rimbaud. An only child raised in a Catholic middle-class family in suburban Maryland, Duffy sees the 1962 death of his mother-essentially by medical malpractice- as what pushed him to be a writer. Duffy graduated from the University of Maryland in 1973, and has hitchhiked twice across the United States, worked construction, washed dishes, hopped freight trains with hoboes, and reported stories that have taken him.

Last Comes the Egg Format: Paperback Authors: Bruce Duffy ISBN10: 1567921248 Published: 2001-03-01 Bruce Duffy's first novel, The World As I. .A dream debut, it raised the stakes for his second book irrationally high.

Last Comes the Egg Format: Paperback Authors: Bruce Duffy ISBN10: 1567921248 Published: 2001-03-01 Bruce Duffy's first novel, The World As I Found It, was universally acclaimed as "astonishing," "spectacular," "vivid, passionate and funny. A dream debut, it raised the stakes for his second book irrationally high

Two white boys and a Black boy in the early 1960s set out in a stolen car to find the love that is absent from their lives in the form of family or friends
Anaginn
I'm Bruce Duffy's daughter. Many people found this book to be a "dissapointment" and have racial slurs, and just be a "weird" novel. What no one realizes is that although exaggerated, some of these events actually happened. Its such a raw, real book. My Dad wrote something for himself, hes been through so much emotional childhood pain and this book was a release. He didn't care much what anyone thought of it. It was mainly for him, a sort of therapy. I think that it was quite brave of him to write a book and not focus on whether or not it would be comparable to "The World As I Found It." If he had gotten caught up in that, it wouldn't have been literature, simply a fake attempt at depth and masterpeice. I found this book, because of the motives behind it (and I won't lie...because I understood it better than his first novel, seeing as I am 15) to be much more profound than any "classic" contrived novel.

--Lily Duffy
Tiv
Bruce Duffy has written a sensitive book of great depth. The loss of his mother, Joan, and the painful tale of Frank and his father, John, trying to survive the agony of cataclysm, and, in the process, further fracturing an already splintered relationship, makes for an unusually compelling story. I cried for the twelve-year old Frank in the loneliness of his Kensington suburb.

I know comparisons are odious, but Holden Caulfield has a serious rival in Frank Dougherty
Granirad
Reading this book reminds me of growing up in the 60's... particulary how weird it was visiting other kid's houses. At that age, I pretty much thought the rest of the world lived the same way I did (compulsively clean Mom), so it was like visiting a foreign country when I'd see other kids bedrooms, and smell the differences between my house and their house.
I hadn't really thought about stuff like that for 20 years... and reading this book brought it all back home. Very, very enjoyable and very, very funny (but tragic-fun... the best kind).
Gavikelv
I would have enjoyed the book more if I had not known that the author received a Guggenheim and several other prestigious writing awards, and if he had not been compared to JD Salinger on the back cover blurb. I received the book as a gift, and have not read his first one which is highly acclaimed. So I understand his daughter's frustration with the criticism, but if someone that highly acclaimed decides to write and publish a book "just for himself," without giving the attention to plot and narrative that one would expect from someone of his highly touted stature, people who take the time to read it are going to be disappointed. And they will certainly be less likely to read his other book(s).

Indeed, it did seem as though Mr. Duffy consciously set out to recreate "Catcher in the Rye" in the late 60s - early 70s. Thus, the roaming around, the urgently disappointing sex, even the attempts at metaphor all sound contrived, as if they were simply efforts to hit all of the score points in Catcher. The emulation of Salinger also undermines the concept that the book fails because it was "a book for himself." The book fails because the author fell prey to one of the key failings of budding authors - thinking that his own childhood is so interesting that just putting it into words will charm the reader. There's a reason why the most popular memoirs usually turn out to be fake.

The concept of the "egg" was interesting, but it had no organic relationship to the characters in the narrative. Yes, all of the events were connected with loss of innocence and coming of age, but don't forget: WE ALL DO THAT. Or did it at some point in our lives. And we all (or most of us) had strange things happen during our adolescence. For example, Alvy shot a dog and put it in the trunk. The two white boys had an ambivalent black sidekick who sees his mom's grave. They get "saved" by an elderly black couple. Race was a huge big deal back then, but it's another story and another book or two. What do any of these things have to do with the sole emotionally gripping factor in the narrative - Frank's loss of his mother and his eventual finding out (ambiguously) that he was a child of incest between his mother and brother, and that his dad wasn't really his dad at all. That would have been a heck of a story. And if it did really happen to the author, a wrenchingly hard one to write.

Which is probably why Mr. Duffy wove the distractions of the Loomis family, road trip, racial animosity and trying to be Salinger all around it, leaving the unsatisfying feeling that the thread had been dropped toward the end. I know the feeling. I was raised in a troubled family, and it's freaking hard to write about that stuff, even though I'm an excellent writer. That's why I use my excellent writing skills to write legal briefs for a living. There are some things you just can't say.

I've got an idea. Rewrite it. I know, it's too late, you've already published it. But why not? Just because it's never been done before? Really tackle that story about Frank losing his mother. The only genuinely moving parts of the book are those that directly tackle it. Frank loses his mother at an age when most teenagers are distancing themselves from their parents. And yet at no point in the book does he ever emit an ounce of GUILT? Look, maybe the whole book is about how Frank was distancing himself from the guilt that never shows, but if it really, REALLY never shows, then the reader can't be moved by it.

And yes, Mr. Duffy, I know I'm psychoanalyzing you. But your daughter kind of asked for it. And so did your book. And your Guggenheim.
Fordrekelv
I knew Bruce as a phibeta kappa at the University of Md. I "reviewed" this book . I picked it up and set it down. Bruce is/was a talented individual but I thought the length and time involved was too much ( as Shaw remarked on Joyce).Great talent. Great length. In interpretation, realize Bruce's mother also died in his youth. Art imitates life.
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