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Walk the Blue Fields ePub download

by Claire Keegan

  • Author: Claire Keegan
  • ISBN: 0571233074
  • ISBN13: 978-0571233076
  • ePub: 1485 kb | FB2: 1306 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (May 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 192
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 790
  • Format: lrf mbr txt docx
Walk the Blue Fields ePub download

Walk the Blue Fields. The Forester’s Daughter. Walk the Blue Fields. Earlier, the women came with flowers, each one a deeper shade of red.

Walk the Blue Fields. In the chapel, where they waited, their scent was strong.

Walk the Blue Fields book. Claire Keegan’s brilliant debut collection, Antarctica, was a Los Angeles Times Book of the Year, and earned her resounding accolades on both sides of the Atlantic

Walk the Blue Fields book. Claire Keegan’s brilliant debut collection, Antarctica, was a Los Angeles Times Book of the Year, and earned her resounding accolades on both sides of the Atlantic. Now she has delivered her next, much-anticipated book, Walk the Blue Fields, an unforgettable array of quietly wrenching stories about despair and desire in the timeless world of modern-day Ireland.

Claire Keegan's 'Walk The Blue Fields' has changed my mind on short stories. Like a secret threshold I crossed over into an old Irish world. The individual tales in this book reminded me of stories my own heart didn't know until the words came alive with sound on the page written with the Irish dialect that engages one immediately. Ms. Keegan writes with an extraordinary and enchanting beauty and I felt transported and wishing for a return to Ireland and the feelings of attachment to my great grandparents.

Claire Keegan's short story collection Walk the Blue Fields shines a light into the world of rural Ireland, says Anne .

Claire Keegan's short story collection Walk the Blue Fields shines a light into the world of rural Ireland, says Anne Enright. In these seven, perfect short stories Claire Keegan presents a timeless world where the neighbours gossip, the cows stand bawling at the gate, and "the farmer's days are numbered. The hurts she describes are so ancient and keen that we find ourselves scrabbling for a timeline, noting avocado starters, wondering when the petrol strike was, and when the Ford Cortina went out of circulation

It’s hot in New York but it may turn cold in winter. All morning the bantam cocks have crowed. It’s not something you will miss. You must dress and wash, polish your shoes.

It’s hot in New York but it may turn cold in winter. You must dress and wash, polish your shoes ields, white and blank as pages. Soon the sun will burn it off. It’s a fine day for the hay. In her bedroom your mother is moving things around, opening and closing doors. You wonder what it will be like for her when you leave. Part of you doesn’t care. She talks through the door. You’ll have a boiled egg?’. You’ll have something?’.

A second book of stories by the Irish writer Claire Keegan

A second book of stories by the Irish writer Claire Keegan. Initially his observations seem a little humdrum, the detached concern of God’s celibate emissary.

Claire Keegan’s brilliant debut collection, Antarctica, was a Los Angeles Times Book of the Year, and earned her .

Claire Keegan’s brilliant debut collection, Antarctica, was a Los Angeles Times Book of the Year, and earned her resounding accolades on both sides of the Atlantic.

Set in Ireland, these short stories make for grim reading and the author doesn't hold back on any subject matter. Antartica by Claire Keegan. Country of the Grand by Gerald Donovan. Any novel by Jodi Picoult. This is actually a refreshing change - and that events such as child abuse and Catholic priests falling in love, really do happen. Each story is so realistic that they sent shivers down my spine. They're easy to read as the writing style is so matter-of-fact. A cheery anthology this isn't - but convincing it is. Find similar books Profile. A long-haired woman moves into the priest's house and sets fire to his furniture. In her long-awaited second collection, Claire Keegan observes an Ireland wrestling with its past. That Christmas, the electricity goes out. A forester mortgages his land and goes off to a seaside town looking for a wife. He finds a woman eating alone in the hotel. A farmer wakes half-naked and realises the money is almost gone. And in the title story, a priest waits on the altar for a bride and battles, all that wedding day, with his memories of a love affair.

A long-haired woman moves into the priest's house and sets fire to his furniture. That Christmas, the electricity goes out. A forester mortgages his land and goes off to a seaside town looking for a wife. He finds a woman eating alone in the hotel. A farmer wakes half-naked and realises the money is almost gone. And in the title story, a priest waits on the altar for a bride and battles, all that wedding day, with his memories of a love affair. In her long-awaited second collection, Claire Keegan observes an Ireland wrestling with its past.
Yainai
I suppose the first thing that comes to mind when I think of these short stories is that they have a strange relevance to today's uncertain world where the personal quests for economic, romantic and psychological security are ultimately doomed to failure.

The consistent theme weaving through these stories is that of a past that haunts the characters and is their ball and chain into the present and future. The stories revolve around familiar Irish subjects: shamed priests, writers, quirky women condemned as whores, and bored and destitute farmers.

The "Night of the Quicken Trees" combines most of these subjects and is the most compelling story in the book. It takes place on a wind swept plot of land overlooking the Cliffs of Moher, the last bit of Ireland until the Arran Islands. Steeped in mysticism, this tale involves Margaret's humorous and semi-tragic race against time to have a child to replace the baby she lost from crib death. Her decision to leave her home with her child and seek a safe haven from life's threats in the Arran Islands is the most spiritual and redemptive moment in the collection of stories.

"Irish Gothic" is how I would best describe the short stories. If Flannery O'Connor were still alive and visited modern Ireland, I think her reflections would be similar.
Ballardana
This is the second book of short stories by this author that I have read. Each story is unique and has some very sad parts and some laugh out loud parts. If you enjoy short stories then you should read the ones written by this author.
Whitecaster
Loved all of the stories, though the first ("The Parting Gift") was a favorite: a simple story of a girl leaving home, it is an unsentimental yet wrenching read. A familiarity with Irish folk-tales would be helpful, but not necessary for some of the other stories.
Stan
I was captivated by each story in Blue Fields. Claire Keegan has a rare and spare voice that manages to convey the sadness of the soul, the treacherous waters called love, the messy interconnectivity of human life as played out in rural Ireland. She recognizes also that resolution and redemption often escape our desperate attempts to find peace. I loved the book and recommend it highly, but be advised that these are not your Irish barstool yarns.
Lanionge
Claire Keegan is truly one of the most gifted and talented writers in the world. Having read Antarctica, I bought this book (and after writing this review, am immediately going to order everything else she's ever written!). Each story is a gem. She draws you into each character, nothing contrived or unnatural. Her descriptive narrative is so effective and brilliant, I found myself taking my time in savoring each word, re-reading passages, as I have a habit of speed reading. This book is like a fine, 7 course meal, where you want to savor each bite and chew slowly. I could honestly say I've never read another book quite like it. It was the epitome of brilliant, beautiful writing and originality. A treasured book, which will now reside on my Do Not Lend shelf, as I will read it again. My only complaint is, I wish it were 600 pages.
dermeco
Claire Keegan's 'Walk The Blue Fields' has changed my mind on short stories. Like a secret threshold I crossed over into an old Irish world. The individual tales in this book reminded me of stories my own heart didn't know until the words came alive with sound on the page written with the Irish dialect that engages one immediately.

Ms. Keegan writes with an extraordinary and enchanting beauty and I felt transported and wishing for a return to Ireland and the feelings of attachment to my great grandparents. I also felt more connected to my own inner world and am grateful to this author for that, also. There was also a dramatic ending to the stories, a halt that has stayed with me and returns to me.

Lines as "But however she changed her behaviour, she could do nothing about her nature" from my favorite story "Night of the Quicken Trees" made me smile at the universality of such a truth; I see it in my counseling profession.

The stories in Walk The Blue Fields are not all light and that is what I liked about them, too. Real life is oftentimes a harsh mixture of light and dark. I also know my many writer friends will enjoy the richness of these short stories and I will give them a copy.

I'm so grateful that my son introduced me to Ms. Keegan and gave me her lovely book this very Christmas teaching me once more that this mother can learn from her grown child.
Beahelm
Claire Keegan, an Irish author, doesn't just write stories.
She is a magical storyteller who takes you down to the deepest and darkest places of her characters' hearts. Her stories will stay with you. Not only because they are of incredible beauty, but because her words will make you feel the pain and the joy of those she chooses to show you. There is, for instance, the priest, who picks up a bride's pearls after the string breaks. She once was his secret lover and he tells himself that "if she blinked, he would take her hand and take her away from this place. It's what she once wanted but two people hardly ever want the same thing at any given point in life." There is also "the girl, whose father has never given her so much as a tender word, [she] embraces the retriever and with it the possibility that Deegan loves her, after all."
Keegan's stories are about the longing for love we all carry around with us all of our lives. It's an old topic, but a topic told to us in new and heart-wrenching ways.
I bought this for my boyfriend for Christmas... And he read it. In silence. Never said a thing, other than to tell me the first story was very disturbing (I won't spoil it for you... but it was.) I can't tell if he liked it at all, but he did seem engrossed while reading.
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