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I sweep the sun off rooftops: Stories ePub download

by Ḥanān Shaykh

  • Author: Ḥanān Shaykh
  • ISBN: 1863736875
  • ISBN13: 978-1863736879
  • ePub: 1573 kb | FB2: 1819 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Publisher: Allen & Unwin; First Thus edition (1994)
  • Pages: 233
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 160
  • Format: docx mbr lit lrf
I sweep the sun off rooftops: Stories ePub download

Hanan al-Shaykh was born & raised in Lebanon. She is the author of three novels - "Women of Sand & Myrrh", "The Story of Zahra" & "Beirut Blues" - as well as a collection of short stories, "I Sweep the Sun off Rooftops". She currently lives in London with her husband & two children.

Hanan al-Shaykh was born & raised in Lebanon. Библиографические данные.

Place de la Catastrophe. I Don’t Want to Grow Up. I Sweep the Sun off Rooftops. The White Peacock of Holland Park.

Lebanese writer Hanan Al-Shaykh at Helsinki Book Fair 2003. I Sweep the Sun Off Rooftops (Trans. Specific examples include The Story of Zahra which includes abortion, divorce, sanity, illegitimacy and sexual promiscuity, and Women of Sand and Myrrh which contains scenes of a lesbian relationship between two of the main protagonists.

Hanan al-Shaykh, an award-winning journalist, novelist, and playwright, is the author of the short story collection I Sweep the Sun off Rooftops; the novels One Thousand and One Nights, The Story of Zahra, Women of Sand and Myrrh, Beirut Blues, and Only in London; and a memoir about.

Hanan al-Shaykh, an award-winning journalist, novelist, and playwright, is the author of the short story collection I Sweep the Sun off Rooftops; the novels One Thousand and One Nights, The Story of Zahra, Women of Sand and Myrrh, Beirut Blues, and Only in London; and a memoir about her mother, The Locust and the Bird.

At once clever and evocative, I Sweep the Sun Off Rooftops is a collection of great insight, wit and poignancy, placing Hanan al-Shaykh among the . I loved this book, about woman in the Middles East in present day, trying to keep their traditions alive while entering into a new world

At once clever and evocative, I Sweep the Sun Off Rooftops is a collection of great insight, wit and poignancy, placing Hanan al-Shaykh among the foremost cosmopolitan writers of our time. I loved this book, about woman in the Middles East in present day, trying to keep their traditions alive while entering into a new world. Loved the visuals and the writing, learning about their.

Hanan al-Shaykh, an award-winning journalist, novelist, and playwright, is the author of the short-story collections I Sweep the Sun Off Rooftops and One Thousand and One Nights; the novels The Story of Zahra, Women of Sand and Myrrh, Beirut Blues. ore about Hanan al-Shaykh.

I Sweep the Sun Off Rooftops. In these seventeen short stories-eleven of which are appearing in English for the first time-al-Shaykh expands her horizons beyond the boundaries of Lebanon, taking us throughout the Middle East, to Africa, and finally to London

I Sweep the Sun Off Rooftops. In these seventeen short stories-eleven of which are appearing in English for the first time-al-Shaykh expands her horizons beyond the boundaries of Lebanon, taking us throughout the Middle East, to Africa, and finally to London. Stylistically diverse, her stories are often about the shifting and ambiguous power relationships between different cultures-as well as between men and women. Often compared to both Margaret Atwood and Margaret Drabble, Hanan al-Shaykh is "a gifted and courageous writer" (Middle Eastern International).

I had always hated her nose. The day before I had banged the door in her face and emptied the rubbish bin on her from the balcony as she went to get in the car and drive away. I scattered frangipani. blossoms over her and sang to her and put a garland of jasmine around her neck, pulling her toward me and kissing her face and hands and her silk scarf. I took the scarf off her and spread it out on the floor and asked her why we did not hire one of the horse-drawn carriages printed on it.

Start by marking I Sweep The Sun Off Rooftops: Stories as Want to Read . I had high hopes for this book of short stories based in Lebanon and started reading with some of those hopes fulfilled.

Start by marking I Sweep The Sun Off Rooftops: Stories as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Gradually I found a certain sameness creeping in, primarily of writing style and tone, negativity toward most "others" in whichever protagonists' life and constant wistfulness, dreaminess. Perhaps this comes of living in a war zone.

In these seventeen short stories-eleven of which are appearing in English for the first time-al-Shaykh expands her horizons beyond the boundaries of Lebanon, taking us. .Books related to I Sweep the Sun Off Rooftops.

In these seventeen short stories-eleven of which are appearing in English for the first time-al-Shaykh expands her horizons beyond the boundaries of Lebanon, taking us throughout the Middle East, to Africa, and finally to London.

Oreavi
This is a fascinating collection of short stories. Nearly all are very readable without once checking how many pages you have left.
The first few stories depend primarily on the plot, and to an extent the element of surprise or shock. Don't read reviews that take you step by step into every story. You as a reader can never really guess where Hanan Al Sheikh is going with her plot, until all of a sudden, wham here it is, a surprise, and sure enough it does flow. I felt these were very clever but generally not may favorite.
Several stories were not as dependent on the element of surprise and were truly enjoyable portrayal of people, feelings, scenery and situations. Some of these especially those of a Lebanese Woman in London having fled the Civil war and another of a Lebanese woman from London visiting Egypt were very well done. Hanan Al Sheikh still managed to insert a surprising end, but you could enjoy both stories regardless of the ending.
I am unsure if the author insistence on a clever plot for her short stories is part of the Arabic tradition of the plot, or just her own personal style. I personally would have liked it more if she just let her imagination roam, paint a situation without necessarily having to be obsessed with l Arabic Literature tradition of "habekah"
A relatively long story of a Danish missionary worker to Yemen was my least favorite, even though I still enjoyed it. In general I felt the author was a much better and more genuine portraying Arab woman.
Hanan Al Sheikh portrayal of life in Egypt, Lebanon, and Yemen and of immigrant life in UK and Africa came across vivid. She dealt with many difficult and up to the last 15 years or so taboo issues.
The translation was superb, often when reading translated work, it is hard to appreciate intelligent and sensitive prose. Here that was not the case at all, in fact it is very difficult to conceive of some of the stories as translated work at all.
Overall I highly recommend this collection of short stories. If you do like this book, you will definitely enjoy Sana Hassan, Leila Ahmed and Ahdaf Souief, who..., unlike Hanan Al Sheikh, write in English.
Kage
Although the backgrounds of the women in these stories are diverse, from an educated Europeanized Arab woman, modern and not-so-modern women living in Arab countries, and a European refugee into Arab lands, they share similar concerns: alientation, fear of being consumed by marriage and/or men, the conflict between independence (the West) and security (the Mid East/Islamic).
The stories are neither happy nor sad, but thoughtful and deep, with more a sense of melancholy hanging over them. The author's narrative style is mostly straightforward, and frequently told from a female perspective. Men are not the bogeyman, but often seemed caught in their own constructed lives as well.
Hamrl
After having read and taught the book, "Women of Sand and Myrrh," I expected more from this collection of short stories. While there are a couple of really shining gems in this collection -- notably the story "A Season of Madness" -- there are many stories which are patly superfluous, and contain very little in the way of plot or character development. Hanan al-Shaykh has the potential to write heart-rending, unforgettable stories -- but this volume is not the best representation of her abilities.
Andriodtargeted
I Sweep The Sun Off Rooftops offers a superb collection of short shorties which open a door, and cast light upon life in the Middle East. Each tale is beguling in its subtlety, woven with a wonderful understanding of language and the complexities of life while sparing nothing in power or passion. Glynne MacLean, Wellington NZ.
IWantYou
I'm just a third of the way into the book. I find the plot and the point of view of the characters so well done. Would that I spoke Arabic so that I could read in the original. Inshallah
Mavegar
I have read all of her books, and Al-Shaykh never ceases to amaze me with her talent. This book (as well as her others) are eccentric, meaningful, and fascinating. Although Women of Sand and Myrrh is probably my favorite of this author, Rooftops come in at a close second.
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