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Her America: “A Jury of Her Peers” and Other Stories ePub download

by Patricia L. Bryan,Martha C. Carpentier,Susan Glaspell

  • Author: Patricia L. Bryan,Martha C. Carpentier,Susan Glaspell
  • ISBN: 1587298643
  • ISBN13: 978-1587298646
  • ePub: 1140 kb | FB2: 1177 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Publisher: University Of Iowa Press; 1 edition (July 1, 2010)
  • Pages: 216
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 200
  • Format: azw mbr lit lrf
Her America: “A Jury of Her Peers” and Other Stories ePub download

This new collection reprints A Jury of Her Peers -restoring its original ending-and brings to light eleven other outstanding stories, offering modern readers the chance to appreciate the full range of Glaspell’s literary skills. The superb introduction by two Glaspell scholars, Patricia L. Bryan and Martha Carpentier, places Glaspell within the traditions of American Literature and makes a convincing case that she deserves to be read and studied by contemporary students and lovers of fiction.

A Jury of Her Peers", written in 1917, is a short story by Susan Glaspell, loosely based on the 1900 murder of John Hossack (not the famed abolitionist).

A Jury of Her Peers", written in 1917, is a short story by Susan Glaspell, loosely based on the 1900 murder of John Hossack (not the famed abolitionist), which Glaspell covered while working as a journalist for the Des Moines Daily News. It is seen as an example of early feminist literature because two female characters are able to solve a mystery that the male characters cannot. They are aided by their knowledge of women's psychology.

Although she was a best-selling author in her own time, Glaspell's stories fell out of print after her death. She was noted primarily for discovering playwright Eugene O'Neill. Critical reassessment of women's contributions since the late 20th century has led to renewed interest in her career. In the early 21st century she is today recognized as a pioneering feminist writer and America's first important modern female playwright. Her one-act play Trifles (1916) is frequently cited as one of the greatest works of American theatre.

Her short story version of Trifles, A Jury of Her Peers, reached an unprecedented one million readers in 1917

Her short story version of Trifles, A Jury of Her Peers, reached an unprecedented one million readers in 1917. The play and the story have since been taught in classrooms across America and Trifles is regularly revived on stages around the world. This collection of fresh essays celebrates the centennial of Trifles and A Jury of Her Peers, with departures from established Glaspell scholarship. Interviews with theater people are included along with two original works inspired by Glaspell’s iconic writings. Martha C. Carpentier, Emeline Jouve.

Susan Glaspell’s short story, A Jury of Her Peers, was written long before the modern women’s movement began, yet her story reveals, through Glaspell’s use of symbolism, the role that women are expected to play in society. Glaspell illustrates how this highly stereotypical role can create oppression for women and also bring harm to men as well. Character names are very important in A Jury of her Peers. The two characters, John and Minnie Wright, are the focus of the story. The name Minnie has significant symbolism.

The Road to the Temple (1926), a biography of George Cram Cook

The Road to the Temple (1926), a biography of George Cram Cook. Individual short works. The Busy Duck" in Harper's Magazine, Vol 137, 1918.

A Jury of Her Peers (1917) is adapted from Glaspell's one-act play Trifles (1916). When Martha Hale opened the storm-door and got a cut of the north wind, she ran back for her big woolen scarf

A Jury of Her Peers (1917) is adapted from Glaspell's one-act play Trifles (1916). It is based on a murder case she covered as a reporter for the Des Moines Daily News. We feature it in Mystery Stories. When Martha Hale opened the storm-door and got a cut of the north wind, she ran back for her big woolen scarf. As she hurriedly wound that round her head her eye made a scandalized sweep of her kitchen. It was no ordinary thing that called her away-it was probably further from ordinary than anything that had ever happened in Dickson County.

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A Jury of her Peers a story now considered a feminist classic, was apparently re-discovered in the 1970’s, written in. .been abandoned by her husband.

It is a story which highlights the oppression of women, and the inequalities with how women are perceived. Susan Glaspell’s writing certainly deserves to be wider read and appreciated; I suspect she is probably more widely read in the US than over here.

A Jury Of Her Peers is a short story by American Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, actress, director, novelist, biographer and poet, Susan Glaspell. It was adapted from her one-act play, Trifles written in 1916. When Sheriff Henry Peters and Young George Henderson, the county attorney come to collect Mr Hale for their examination of the murder scene at their neighbours, the Wrights’ house, they have Mrs Peters with them, so Mr Hale insists that his wife, Martha comes along to keep Mrs Peters company.

One of the preeminent authors of the early twentieth century, Susan Glaspell (1876–1948) produced fourteen ground-breaking plays, nine novels, and more than fifty short stories. Her work was popular and critically acclaimed during her lifetime, with her novels appearing on best-seller lists and her stories published in major magazines and in The Best American Short Stories. Many of her short works display her remarkable abilities as a humorist, satirizing cultural conventions and the narrowness of small-town life. And yet they also evoke serious questions—relevant as much today as during Glaspell’s lifetime—about society’s values and priorities and about the individual search for self-fulfillment. While the classic “A Jury of Her Peers” has been widely anthologized in the last several decades, the other stories Glaspell wrote between 1915 and 1925 have not been available since their original appearance. This new collection reprints “A Jury of Her Peers”—restoring its original ending—and brings to light eleven other outstanding stories, offering modern readers the chance to appreciate the full range of Glaspell’s literary skills.       Glaspell was part of a generation of midwestern writers and artists, including Sherwood Anderson, Sinclair Lewis, Willa Cather, and F. Scott Fitzgerald, who migrated first to Chicago and then east to New York. Like these other writers, she retained a deep love for and a deep ambivalence about her native region. She parodied its provincialism and narrow-mindedness, but she also celebrated its pioneering and agricultural traditions and its unpretentious values. Witty, gently humorous, satiric, provocative, and moving, the stories in this timely collection run the gamut from acerbic to laugh-out-loud funny to thought-provoking. In addition, at least five of them provide background to and thematic comparisons with Glaspell’s innovative plays that will be useful to dramatic teachers, students, and producers.       With its thoughtful introduction by two widely published Glaspell scholars, Her America marks an important contribution to the ongoing critical and scholarly efforts to return Glaspell to her former preeminence as a major writer. The universality and relevance of her work to political and social issues that continue to preoccupy American discourse—free speech, ethics, civic justice, immigration, adoption, and gender—establish her as a direct descendant of the American tradition of short fiction derived from Hawthorne, Poe, and Twain.