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The Essential Teachings of Zen Master Hakuin: A Translation of the Sokko-roku Kaien-fusetsu (Shambhala Classics) ePub download

by Hakuin Ekaku,Norman Waddell

  • Author: Hakuin Ekaku,Norman Waddell
  • ISBN: 1590308069
  • ISBN13: 978-1590308066
  • ePub: 1358 kb | FB2: 1565 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Publisher: Shambhala (July 13, 2010)
  • Pages: 176
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 123
  • Format: lit lrf docx mbr
The Essential Teachings of Zen Master Hakuin: A Translation of the Sokko-roku Kaien-fusetsu (Shambhala Classics) ePub download

by Hakuin Ekaku (Author), Norman Waddell (Translator). And this book not only explains Zen, but it does so in a truly traditional Japanese way, in the words of a Japanese master.

by Hakuin Ekaku (Author), Norman Waddell (Translator). I like many books about Buddhism written by modern Western writers and/or for a Western audience, but they sometimes can seem too superficial. That is, they don't really delve down deep into simple but fundamental truth. And too many of them also go to great pains to be so very secular, eschewing any hint that Buddhism has a religious-like aspect, and instead treat Buddhism almost like a self-help regimen.

Here, Hakuin sets forth his vision of authentic Zen teaching and practice, condemning his contemporaries, whom he held responsible for the decline of Zen, and exhorting his students to dedicate themselves to "breaking through the Zen barrier

Here, Hakuin sets forth his vision of authentic Zen teaching and practice, condemning his contemporaries, whom he held responsible for the decline of Zen, and exhorting his students to dedicate themselves to "breaking through the Zen barrier. Included are reproductions of several of Hakuin's finest calligraphies and paintings.

The essential teachings of Zen Master Hakuin: a translation of the Sokkō-roku Kaien-fusetsu. Hakuin (author), Norman Waddell (translator). Download (pdf, 1. 8 Mb) Donate Read.

Hakuin sets forth his vision of authentic Zen teaching and practice, condemning his contemporaries . Wow, what a book! And what a translation - so full of fire, Waddell seemed to bring Hakuin alive and place him in the room with me.

Hakuin sets forth his vision of authentic Zen teaching and practice, condemning his contemporaries, whom he held responsible for the decline of Zen, and exhorting his students to dedicate themselves to breaking through the Zen barrier. Included are reproductions of several of Hakuin’s finest calligraphies and paintings. A chronological biography of Zen Priest Hakuin: Hakuin Oshō Nempu (Part 1). The Eastern Buddhist, 1994 (New Series) 27/1: 96–155. By Norman Waddell, Shambhala, Boston, Mass. 1994, 137 p. 息耕録開筵普説 PDF: The Essential Teachings of Zen Master Hakuin: A Translation of the Sokkō-roku Kaien-fusetsu by Norman Waddell. HTML: Introductory to Lectures on the Records of Old Sokko Translated by Norman Waddell. Part 2). The Eastern Buddhist, 1994 (New Series) 27/2: 81–129.

The Zen Teachings 0/ Master Lin-chi A TRANSLATION OF THE LIN-CHI LV BY BURTON WATSON SHAMBHALA .

The Zen Teachings 0/ Master Lin-chi A TRANSLATION OF THE LIN-CHI LV BY BURTON WATSON SHAMBHALA Boston & London 1993. Empty Cloud, The Teachings Of Zen Master Xu Yun. Empty Cloud: The Teachings of Xu (Hsu) Yun A Remembrance of the Great Chinese Zen Master As compiled from the notes and. The Long Discourses of the Buddha: A Translation of the Digha Nikaya (Teachings of the Buddha) Bodhidharma: The Greatest Zen Master.

SHAMBHALA Boston & London 2010 THE ESSENTIAL TEACHINGS OF ZEN MASTER HAKUIN A translation of the Sokko¯-roku Kaien-fusetsu by norman waddell. Shambhala Publications, Inc. Horticultural HallHorticultural Hall 300300 Massachusetts AvenueMassachusetts Avenue Boston, MassachusettsBoston, Massachusetts 0211502115 www. shambhala. No part of this book may be reproducedAll rights reserved.

Hakuin's teachings are well represented and this is an excellent source for those interested in deepening their .

Hakuin's teachings are well represented and this is an excellent source for those interested in deepening their "intellectual" understanding of Buddhism. Hakuin's Rinzai Manifesto. com User, May 26, 2007. That would be a mistake.

Discover Hakuin Ekaku famous and rare quotes. The Essential Teachings of Zen Master Hakuin: A Translation of the Sokko-roku Kaien-fusetsu, ., Shambhala Publications.

A Translation of the Sokko-roku Kaien-fusetsu. From the tiny country temple in which he spent most of his life, Hakuin Ekaku (. 685-1768) almost single-handedly revitalised Japanese Zen, which had been in decline for centuries before he came on the scene

A Translation of the Sokko-roku Kaien-fusetsu. Price for Eshop: 467 Kč (€ 1. ). 685-1768) almost single-handedly revitalised Japanese Zen, which had been in decline for centuries before he came on the scene. Read this essential text and you'll understand how he did it. Ask question. You can ask us about this book and we'll send an answer to your e-mail.

A fiery and intensely dynamic Zen teacher and artist, Hakuin (1685–1768) is credited with almost single-handedly revitalizing Japanese Zen after three hundred years of decline. As a teacher, he placed special emphasis on koan practice, inventing many new koans himself, including the famous “What is the sound of one hand clapping?” As an artist, Hakuin used calligraphy and painting to create “visual Dharma”—teachings that powerfully express the nature of enlightenment. The text translated here offers an excellent introduction to the work of this extraordinary teacher. Hakuin sets forth his vision of authentic Zen teaching and practice, condemning his contemporaries, whom he held responsible for the decline of Zen, and exhorting his students to dedicate themselves to “breaking through the Zen barrier.” Included are reproductions of several of Hakuin’s finest calligraphies and paintings.
Adaly
I'm not going to say much but to quote an exchange from the book. It says it all.

Questioner: "... what can I do to become awakened to my own mind?”

Master: What is that which asks such a question? Is it your mind? Is it your original nature? Is it some kind of spirit or demon? Is it inside you? Outside you? Is it somewhere intermediate? Is it blue, yellow, red, or white? This is something you must investigate and clarify for yourself. You must investigate it whether you are standing or sitting, speaking or silent, when you are eating your rice or drinking your tea. You must keep at it with total, single-minded devotion. And never, whatever you do, look in sutras or in commentaries for an answer, or seek it in the words you hear a teacher speak. When all the effort you can muster has been exhausted and you have reached a total impasse, and you are like the cat at the rathole, like the mother hen warming her egg, it will suddenly come and you will break free. The phoenix will get through the golden net. The crane will fly clear of the cage.
Anaginn
Any book on this truly remarkable Zen Master is a boon to our kind. This volume in particular is an invaluable addition to any Zen practitioners library as it offers the most important of Hakuin's ideas. I can't recommend it highly enough.
Adokelv
My problem with Hakuin is that 90% of text is his poisonous attacks against other masters and against lazy Zen students. The other 10% is incomprehensible Zen language. I concede that it might be the case I'm just too spiritually incompetent or stupid to understand him. Be it as it may, reading Hakuin is completely unrewarding to me.
Sennnel
The book looks interesting but as of this date I haven't read it. Hopefully the book will be a great read.
Feri
I must say, I like this book. It has a few flaws, which I will mention near the bottom, but overall I found the volume to be quite useful. To begin, the text itself is completely understandable to a modern Westerner. It is clear, concise, and conveys complicated ideas in a comprehensible manner. This quality may be due in part to the particular translation, but it is also largely due to the clear writing of Hakuin himself. Why do I mention this at the beginning? I've read other older/traditional Asian Buddhist texts, and many of them are highly abstruse, even for an educated Westerner. They often seem as if the reader must have a large well of cultural and experiential background knowledge in order for the texts to even begin to make sense. With this book, however, any intelligent person can pick it up and immediately gain useful knowledge.

I've been studying Buddhism for a couple of years, and have found myself a bit confused by the many different strains of Buddhism. This book is the first I've read that clearly explains the difference between Zen Buddhism and Pure Land Buddhism. (Very roughly, Pure Land Buddhism relies solely on meditation to achieve enlightenment, while Zen views kensho- a sudden, clear insight- as the first true and necessary step to gaining enlightenment. After kensho has been experienced, the hard work of both meditation and study has just begun. Pondering koans is one essential method that leads to kensho.)

And this book not only explains Zen, but it does so in a truly traditional Japanese way, in the words of a Japanese master. I like many books about Buddhism written by modern Western writers and/or for a Western audience, but they sometimes can seem too superficial. That is, they don't really delve down deep into simple but fundamental truth. And too many of them also go to great pains to be so very secular, eschewing any hint that Buddhism has a religious-like aspect, and instead treat Buddhism almost like a self-help regimen. This book is a refreshing and needed change from that type of book.

I wasn't expecting this, but Hakuin has a sense of humor that shines through very clearly. One example: "You could take a conventional explanation like this, knead it up with some good rice, and stick it out under the trees for a thousand days, without getting even a crow to fly by for a second look."

I mentioned above that the book has a few flaws. Flaws might not be the correct word. Perhaps negativities might be better. Hakuin spends a considerable amount of page space excoriating both Pure Land Buddhism and false Zen masters. Some explanation of why he doesn't like them is reasonable, but he goes on at great length. Hakuin was also a main proponent of screaming at students, beating them with sticks, and starving them. This seems extremely un-Buddhist-like to me. In addition, hell is mentioned frequently. And not a theoretical hell, but a fiery, horrible hell. Again, doesn't seen like Buddhism. (But I am a newbie, so what do I know?)

Overall, I would recommend this book highly. The text itself is very useful. And it is preceded by both an excellent Translator's Introduction and a Foreward.
Nuadador
This is a collection of some of Hakuin's writings, some given originally as talks.

As a lay Zen student I find his language electric and inspiring. Of course some of his writing is poetic and difficult to penetrate, as with most Zen masters. But he does give fairly clear directions on what he believes is required to follow this path. I appreciate his uncompromising attitude to Zen practice. Some of his writing is also quite humorous.

It may be better if you can read a few pages before buying, to give you an idea of his style. Some people may not enjoy it, but I love it.
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