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The Grass King's Concubine (Daw Books Collectors) ePub download

by Kari Sperring

  • Author: Kari Sperring
  • ISBN: 0756407559
  • ISBN13: 978-0756407551
  • ePub: 1378 kb | FB2: 1808 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Publisher: DAW; paperback / softback edition (August 7, 2012)
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 722
  • Format: azw txt mobi rtf
The Grass King's Concubine (Daw Books Collectors) ePub download

Indian-like atmosphere and exquisitely detailed land create an unusual and . What wasn’t clear in this book was exactly why everyone hated her so much (except, I suppose, for the influence a mistress would have over a king).

Indian-like atmosphere and exquisitely detailed land create an unusual and enthralling world that traps the reader.

Indian-like atmosphere and exquisitely detailed land create an unusual and . Kari Sperring has been writing as long as she can remember and completed her first novel at the age of eight (twelve pages long and about ponies). She started writing fantasy in her teens, inspired by J. R. Tolkien, Alexandre Dumas and Thomas Mallory.

The Grass King’s Concubine meshes old world flavor and modern . DAW Book Collectors No. 1597

The Grass King’s Concubine meshes old world flavor and modern sensibilities, with flavor-bursts of gosh-wow. Sherwood Smith, author of the Inda novels. 1597. DAW Books are distributed by Penguin Group (USA) Inc. All characters and events in this book are fictitious. If you purchase this book without a cover you should be aware that this book may have been stolen property and reported as unsold and destroyed to the publisher. In such case neither the author nor the publisher has received any payment for this stripped book.

A twin perched on the boat rail, dressed and clear-eyed. Jehan wriggled himself into a more comfortable position, rubbing at the ache. The other twin, still ferret-shaped, jumped into his lap. In the stern, Clairet chewed on a mouthful of something. The container that held her feed stood open

The Grass King's concubine. by. Sperring, Kari, 1962-.

The Grass King's concubine. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Kari Sperring's first novel was a finalist for the Crawford Award, a Tiptree Award Honor Book, a LOCUS Recommended First Novel, and the winner of the Sydney J. Bounds Award for Best Newcomer

Kari Sperring's first novel was a finalist for the Crawford Award, a Tiptree Award Honor Book, a LOCUS Recommended First Novel, and the winner of the Sydney J. Bounds Award for Best Newcomer. Now she returns to the same amazing and atmospheric world with an entirely new story set several hundred years after the earth-shaking events of Living With Ghosts

The Grass King's Concubine book.

The Grass King's Concubine book. Kari Sperring's first novel was a finalist for the Crawford Award, a Tiptree Award Honor Book, a LOCUS Recommended First Novel, and the winner of the Sydney J. Now she returns to the same amazing and atmospheric world with an entirely new story set several hundred years after the earth-shaking events of Living With Ghosts.

About The King’s Concubine Manga: Rupia and 499 other noble girls are summoned in the demon world as candidates to be the Maou’s bride. How will Rupia fare in this unfamiliar world?

About The King’s Concubine Manga: Rupia and 499 other noble girls are summoned in the demon world as candidates to be the Maou’s bride. How will Rupia fare in this unfamiliar world? Is there more to their summoning than meets the eye? Summary.

Download books for free. The Grass King's Concubine.

The Grass King's Concubine (Daw Books Collectors) by Sperring, Kari. VERY GOOD" The King's Concubine, O'Brien, Anne, Book. NICE Sega Master System King's Quest Quest For The Crown Game Complete USED.

Kari Sperring's first novel was a finalist for the Crawford Award, a Tiptree Award Honor Book, a LOCUS Recommended First Novel, and the winner of the Sydney J. Bounds Award for Best Newcomer. Now she returns to the same amazing and atmospheric world with an entirely new story set several hundred years after the earth-shaking events of Living With Ghosts.When a wealthy young woman, obsessed with a childhood vision of a magical Shining Palace, sets out with her true love to search for a legendary land, she discovers the devastated WorldBelow - the realm of the Grass King - and the terrifying Cadre, who take her prisoner, and demand she either restore the king's concubine... or replace her.
Stanober
Author O'Brien hits all the right notes in this fictionalized version of the life of the notorious Alice Perrers, mistress of the aging King Edward III. Alice has been portrayed unsympathetically throughout history, probably due to reports from her contemporaries of her greed and avaricious behavior. What's more realistic is she committed the cardinal sin (at the time) of being smart and business-savvy. In order to protect her future and her children, she began investing in land and manors - in other words, real estate, according to this book long before she even met the king. She became wealthier than many of those around her, and of course on the king's death, she had to be brought down. Fortunately she'd married a man who was her soul mate, strong, practical, and a best friend.

Alice is pictured as a woman ahead of her time - feisty, independent, unsinkable. This book was a delight after I had tried to read an earlier novel of her life by the usually excellent Vanora Bennett, which I found abysmally uninteresting. Ms. O'Brien's book is a pleasure to read....
Moronydit
It's always interesting to see what an author will do with a notorious figure. Alice Perrers has not been treated well by historians; she has been pretty much cast as a grasping, avaricious she-wolf who took advantage of a failing Edward III, taking control of the government in his name. Or something like that. I always wondered how a king’s mistress could wield so much power in the middle ages. I don’t know much of her story, and it was fun to see how Anne O’Brien would make her into a credible character.

Apparently Alice came from an inauspicious beginning, socked away in a nunnery like an abandoned waif. But she was a spunky thing and got herself noticed by no less than the Queen of England, who came to the nunnery for her health. Surprisingly, Queen Philippa later remembered her and summoned Alice to court, to become one of her maids. Of course, Philippa had something else in mind, and Alice found herself to be the King’s plaything as well, placed under the King’s nose by his doting spouse who was no longer well enough to perform her wifely duties. It seemed Philippa preferred that her husband take up with someone of her choosing—someone she could control—rather than risk losing him altogether. It was sort of Philippa and Alice’s secret, though everyone else was scandalized. And Alice was branded for the rest of her life.

Not that her life was bad; Edward liked his mistress very well and showered her with gifts and land. She knew how to take care of herself and proceeded to sock away valuables and manors against the day the King would leave her. How was she to know that after Philippa’s death the King would start to fail, himself? Formidable at the height of his powers, poor Edward fell prey to dementia in his old age, throwing the country into chaos. For his heir, Edward the Black Prince, was dying at the same time and Richard, the next in line was only a child. Alice found herself in the role of nursemaid, trying to protect the king against intrusions that would invariably make his condition worse. While all this was going on, she allied herself with the somewhat disreputable William de Windsor, diplomat and soldier who never took offense at her rebuffs. Although she did not trust him at the beginning, he proved himself her best friend and protector. She would come to need him beyond her wildest fears.

What wasn’t clear in this book was exactly why everyone hated her so much (except, I suppose, for the influence a mistress would have over a king). What did she do to incur such vicious reprisals? There was some suggestion that she might have acquired a manor or two under questionable circumstances, but I didn’t see a whole lot of arbitrary wielding of power. She seemed to spend all of her time in the background. It’s certainly possible that her “crimes” were not well recorded and the author didn’t have much to work with. That wouldn’t surprise me. It’s apparent that Alice was an opportunist, yet at the end she was an unchampioned woman in a man’s world. She found herself abandoned by the men of power who threw her away when they no longer needed her. Her inevitable downfall was more pathetic than explosive, and I felt nothing of the satisfaction I might have expected from a deserving villain. I have a feeling that Alice would have recognized any modern woman in power, whose talents go unappreciated because she is just too much of a threat to the establishment.
Nothing personal
I first read of Alice Perrers, mistress to Edward III, in Thomas Costain's history "The Three Edwards." Predictably, Costain treats Perrers with opprobrium and disdain, ending his book with a description of Alice creeping in to steal the rings off the dead royal hand. This is fairly emblematic of the treatment Perrers has received, both from her contemporaries and by later historians. I thereafter read Emma Campion's "The King's Mistress" hoping to find a more balanced depiction of Perrers' character. That work was a disappointment as it essentially paints Perrers as a victim of circumstance and unwilling pawn in the dangerous courtly games. I found this downgrading of her abilities and talents to be equally unflattering, if not as misogynistic. Perrers rose from obscurity to being the unrivaled and expressly recognized consort of Edward III. She would remain at the king's side and be at the center of the courtly world for nearly 10 years. During that time she amassed a fortune which would have qualified her for an earldom, had she been a man. Surely no Miss Mousie could have accomplished the same or reached and maintained such a degree of power and influence. As I have mentioned in reviews of other works featuring strong medieval women, any female who succeeded in life independent of male support and protection in those times was largely viewed with suspicion rather than admiration and, more often than not, is termed a shrew and a slut if not outright accused of fraud and treason. That being the case, O'Brien does a much better job here giving the devil her due, so to speak, as she clearly understands the grit, courage and determination Perrers possessed in order to survive, as she did.

O'Brien's writing style is graceful and literate. No grammatical missteps or flowery flights of purple prose. The story moves along briskly and events are overall historically accurate. Alice holds her own very well under duress from royal ladies and hostile Parliaments and O'Brien does not shrink from the obvious fact of Perrers' own self-interest being front and center in the choices she makes. I appreciated that the author doesn't apologize for Alice who finds no need to apologize for herself. Overall this is very good historical fiction.
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