» » Tutt and Mr. Tutt (Dodo Press)

Tutt and Mr. Tutt (Dodo Press) ePub download

by Arthur Cheney Train

  • Author: Arthur Cheney Train
  • ISBN: 1406570230
  • ISBN13: 978-1406570236
  • ePub: 1365 kb | FB2: 1439 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Short Stories & Anthologies
  • Publisher: Dodo Press (February 22, 2008)
  • Pages: 228
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 977
  • Format: lrf mobi lit lrf
Tutt and Mr. Tutt (Dodo Press) ePub download

Arthur Cheney Train (1875-1945) was an American lawyer and legal thriller writer, particularly known for his novels of courtroom intrigue and the creation of the fictional lawyer Mr. Ephraim Tutt.

Arthur Cheney Train (1875-1945) was an American lawyer and legal thriller writer, particularly known for his novels of courtroom intrigue and the creation of the fictional lawyer Mr. Ephraim Tutt

Arthur Cheney Train (1875-1945) was an American lawyer and legal thriller writer, particularly known for his novels of courtroom intrigue and the creation of the fictional lawyer Mr. In 1919, he created the popular character of Mr. Ephraim Tutt, a wiley old lawyer who supported the common man and always had a trick up his sleeve to right the law's injustices. He also coauthored the science fiction novel The Man Who Rocked the Earth (1915) with eminent physicist Robert W. Wood. After 1922, Train devoted himself to writing

Ephraim Tutt, a tenacious Vermont lawyer, appears in many novels of an American thriller writer Arthur Cheney Train.

Ephraim Tutt, a tenacious Vermont lawyer, appears in many novels of an American thriller writer Arthur Cheney Train. of New York City of the early 1920s. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

Train, Arthur Cheney, 1875-1945. Book from Project Gutenberg: Tutt and Mr. Tutt. gutenberg etext 10440.

True Stories of Crime From the District Attorney's Office. The Complete Mysteries of Mr.

Tutt and Mr. Tutt book. Based on author Arthur Train’s experiences working in the offices of the New York District Attorney, Tutt and Mr. Tutt is a must-read for fans of legal mysteries. This ebook features a new introduction by Otto Penzler and has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Readers’ enjoyment of Tutt and Mr. Tutt will probably depend on their tolerance and appreciation for Train’s style . I found his best stories (the con artist ones) entertaining enough to give the book a marginal recommendation. Tutt will probably depend on their tolerance and appreciation for Train’s style of writing. Those who enjoy courtroom theatrics, thrillers, or old-fashioned whodunits will be disappointed, and those who don’t care for Train’s racial descriptions (which were probably non-exceptional for the era) may well be highly offended I found his best stories (the con artist ones) entertaining enough to give the book a marginal recommendation. However, the case of Tutt and Mr. Tutt is very much a case of your mileage may vary. 17 people found this helpful.

Tutt prepared the cases for Mr. Tutt to try. Both were well versed in the law if they were not profound lawyers, but as the . They took and pressed cases which other lawyers dared not touch lest they should be defiled-and nobody seemed to think any the less of them for so doing. Both were well versed in the law if they were not profound lawyers, but as the origin of the firm was humble, their practise was of a miscellaneous character. They raised points that made the refinements of the ancient schoolmen seem blunt in comparison. No respecters of persons, they harried the rich and taunted the powerful, and would have as soon jailed a bishop or a judge as a pickpocket if he deserved it.

Arthur Cheney Train (September 6, 1875 – December 22, 1945), also called Arthur Chesney Train, was an American lawyer and writer of legal thrillers, particularly known for his novels of courtroom intrigue and the creation of the fictional lawyer M. .

Arthur Cheney Train (September 6, 1875 – December 22, 1945), also called Arthur Chesney Train, was an American lawyer and writer of legal thrillers, particularly known for his novels of courtroom intrigue and the creation of the fictional lawyer Mr. Train was born in Boston, Massachusetts on September 6, 1875. His father was lawyer Charles Russell Train, who served for many years as attorney general of Massachusetts, and his mother was Sara Maria Cheney.

The Project Gutenberg eBook, Tutt and Mr. Tutt, by Arthur Train. The Hepplewhite Tramp. Lallapaloosa Limited. E-text prepared by Steven desJardins and Project Gutenberg Distributed Proofreaders. Mock Hen and Mock Turtle.

Arthur Cheney Train (1875-1945) was an American lawyer and legal thriller writer, particularly known for his novels of courtroom intrigue and the creation of the fictional lawyer Mr. Ephraim Tutt. In January 1901, Train became assistant in the office of the New York District Attorney and in 1904 he started his literary career with the publication of the short story The Maximilian Diamond in Leslie's Monthly. He spent the next decade running the two careers in parallel. From 1915 to 1922, Train was in private practice as a lawyer with Charles Albert Perkins while continuing to write, not just novels but advertising copy, vaudeville sketch comedy, poetry and journalism. In 1919, he created the popular character of Mr. Ephraim Tutt, a wiley old lawyer who supported the common man and always had a trick up his sleeve to right the law's injustices. He also coauthored the science fiction novel The Man Who Rocked the Earth (1915) with eminent physicist Robert W. Wood. After 1922, Train devoted himself to writing. His works include: The "Goldfish"(1914), Tutt and Mr. Tutt (1919) and By Advice of Counsel (1921).
Bremar
Some authors and their writing age well and some don't. I highly suspect that, 100 years from now, people will still think the same of Shakespeare, Dickens, and Poe as they do now. On the other hand, 22nd century readers may well wonder just what the readers of today saw in some currently popular writers. The works of Arthur Train, including his short story collection “Tutt and Mr. Tutt,” fall into the latter category.

Train was a former New York City assistant district attorney turned defense attorney turned writer. In that regard, he was a precursor to writers like Erle Stanley Gardner and John Grisham, and his most popular works probably were his legal stories. But those expecting either Perry Mason-style whodunits or Grishamesque thrillers will be disappointed. Unlike his literary progeny, Train was an old=fashioned tale spinner who enjoyed expounding at length on his observations of the law and his fellow man. For readers of today, their enjoyment of the stories in “Tutt and Mr. Tutt” will depend on their taste for that type of writing and their willingness to tolerate some material that often relies on rather crude racial stereotypes.

The Mr. Tutt in these stories is a somewhat elderly and crotchety but highly gifted criminal trial attorney named Ephraim Tutt, who bears a considerable resemblance to Clarence Darrow insofar as his choice of cases is concerned. He takes on clients pretty much on a whim based on whether their case strikes his fancy. On the other hand, the Tutt in the stories is a younger attorney of the same last name who serves as Mr. Tutt’s Archie Goodwin (although the stories are written in the third person). Not surprisingly, they are the only two practicing Tutts in New York, and Tutt the younger actively sought out Mr. Tutt because he felt that his last name would give him an edge in landing the job.

The seven stories in this 100-page collection were originally published in various general interest magazines shortly after World War I and are now in the public domain. They tend to be somewhat longwinded, and author Train often takes a long time to get to his point. The stories often revolve around the art of selecting the right jury (Mr. Tutt inevitably proves more adept at this than do his exasperated District Attorney opponents). But, while selecting the right jury is a major factor in the outcome of criminal trials, either 100 years ago or today, Train’s discussion of this point often goes on way too long in these stories, reducing the impact of his endings, in which readers learn just what motivated the jury, to a footnote. Indeed, I only found a couple of the stories to have really good endings.

Surprisingly, three out of these seven stories involve con artistry of one sort or another, as the law firm’s clients turn out to be either con artists themselves or the victims of such. Train proves himself a bit of an old-style David Mamet in telling these tales, in which much of the enjoyment involves seeing just how the con plays out. The best story in the book, “Samuel and Delilah,” finds the younger Tutt rallying to the defense of a young woman who has been treated rather harshly by a would-be suitor who proved much less upright than he first led her to believe. Another good story is “The Dog Andrew,” a tale that revolves around the law of the time regarding dog bites and the liability of the dog owner for the canine’s use of its canines on another person.

While Train, at his best, can be clever and charming, his writing also reflects the racial (and to certain extent class) profiling of his era. Many of the characters are pretty much defined by their ethnicity, and their personalities are stereotypes of the popular perceptions of the era. They talk with exaggerated accents, usually for humorous effect, and Train often uses derogatory slang expressions in a casual manner, intended merely to convey the character’s ethnicity, much as if I described Mr. Tutt as a white lawyer. While I’m sure that audiences of Train’s day found nothing exceptional about this, modern readers should be forewarned.

The worst story in this regard is “Mock Hen and Mock Turtle,” in which members of a Chinese tong execute a rival in an honor killing, and the tong elders hire Mr. Tutt to defend the killer. The story eventually boils down to just what type of white jurors are willing (or unable to avoid) to decide a squabble between two groups of Chinese gangsters and whose story they are more likely to believe. All the while, the various Chinese characters act and talk like they came off the set of a Charlie Chan movie of the 1930’s.

Readers’ enjoyment of “Tutt and Mr. Tutt” will probably depend on their tolerance and appreciation for Train’s style of writing. Those who enjoy courtroom theatrics, thrillers, or old-fashioned whodunits will be disappointed, and those who don’t care for Train’s racial descriptions (which were probably non-exceptional for the era) may well be highly offended . On the other hand, those who like Train’s folksy style and ruminations on the state of the law in that era will find them quaint but enjoyable. I found his best stories (the con artist ones) entertaining enough to give the book a marginal recommendation. However, the case of “Tutt and Mr. Tutt” is very much a case of “your mileage may vary.”
Acebiolane
I gave 4 out of 5 because of flaws, tho I really enjoyed it. It's like being in a smoke-filled room with real lawyers, telling their war stories--only that room exists in the ffirst decades of the 20th century. Fine points of law, funny stories as well as sad ones. A character in one story is a WWI Gold Star Mother. Flaws include racial stereotypes that wd not fly today.
black coffe
These short stories take place in the ethnic, racial, social melting pot of early Twentieth-Century New York. Train seems to enjoy the dynamic interplay of diverse customs, attitudes, and dialects--and prejudices too (not the author's but his characters'). The result is generally sympathetic and sometimes comedic--as in the case of the Chinese witness who will only swear to the truth on the head of a white rooster. Mr. Tutt seems to be at home in this hectic environment: at the end of one story, he finds himself happily dozing off, while clothed in silk garments brocaded with dragons, at a Chinese banquet given in his honor.

Mr. Tutt's genial tolerance for the denizens of New York sharply contrasts with the hostility he bears towards the real villains of these stories: the judges and prosecutors who would abrogate justice for the sake of their political ambitions.
Flarik
Written by, I assume, a fine upstanding member of the bar, the level of respect afforded to the profession is vividly explained.

I believe there is a difference between legal and illegal which may not align exactly with the difference between right and wrong.
I must thank Mr. Train for for his validation of my belief, and for an enjoyable read.
Ynap
An interesting collection of short stories staring the NYC legal firm of Tutt and Tutt. They are not related, but both have the last name of Tutt. The senior partner is called Mr. Tutt, and generally does most of the court room work. Tutt is the junior partner who does most of the legal preparation and paperwork.

The stories address different point s of law from the early 1900s, but are probably still true, unless he law has changed in an area. Entertaining stories which work well a century later, about how the partners use the legal system to do true justice, as it should be done. In some instances, some of the other players are out the use the legal system to do good for themselves or their clients and not do true justice. Well written, and they seem to be legally sound.
Fearlesshunter
Published in 1920, this is a surprisingly entertaining and intelligent book, so funny I actually laughed out loud, which is quite unusual for a book about lawyers. Tutt and Mr. Tutt, " Natural Born and perennial champions of the outraged minority" are products of the author's experience in the field of law. Clever, engaging, refreshing, no wonder it was such a big hit in the 20's. It holds up well with time!
unmasked
Mr.Tutt was a character created by the author who was, himself a lawyer. Mr.Tutt appeared in stories in "The Saturday Evening Post", 20th Century America's most popular magazine. Mr.Tutt is a New York lawyer who champions the underdog and finds ways to exticate him from unfair legal entanglements by either applying or finding his way around some arcane legal point.

Train's portrayal of the legal system is as accurate today as it was 90 tears ago.

It's always a treat to read a story where the bad guy gets his comeupance, as usually occurs in these tales.

Tutt is the lawyer everyone wishes to retain.

I believe that this is the first of the Mr. Tutt books.
Mr. Train's background creates authenticity and a richness of detail. Deals in various ways with the idea that something may be legal without being ethical. Studded throughout with gems of wry humor and quotable statements that are a nice plus, in particular what it says about progressives before they became liberals then morphed back into progressives
E-Books Related to Tutt and Mr. Tutt (Dodo Press):