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John Clare's Religion (The Nineteenth Century) ePub download

by Sarah Houghton-Walker

  • Author: Sarah Houghton-Walker
  • ISBN: 0754665143
  • ISBN13: 978-0754665144
  • ePub: 1814 kb | FB2: 1526 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Poetry
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1st edition (April 28, 2009)
  • Pages: 264
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 443
  • Format: txt lit azw mobi
John Clare's Religion (The Nineteenth Century) ePub download

John Clare's Religion (The Nineteenth Century Series). Sarah Houghton-Walker.

John Clare's Religion (The Nineteenth Century Series). Скачать (pdf, . 8 Mb).

Sarah Houghton-Walker. Addressing a neglected aspect of John Clare's history, Sarah Houghton-Walker explores Clare's poetry within the framework of his faith and the religious context in which he lived. While Clare expressed affection for the Established Church and other denominations on various occasions, Houghton-Walker brings together a vast array of evidence to show that any exploration of Clare's religious faith must go beyond pulpit and chapel

Addressing a neglected aspect of John Clare's history, Sarah Houghton-Walker engages with Clare's poetry within the context of his faith and the religious milieu in which he lived.

Addressing a neglected aspect of John Clare's history, Sarah Houghton-Walker engages with Clare's poetry within the context of his faith and the religious milieu in which he lived. Her book engages not only with the facts of Clare's more traditional religious habits but also with the ways in which he was literally inspired and how that inspiration is connected to his vision of the natural, to his intimations of divinity, and thus to his poetry. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Houghton-Walker Dr Sarah (EN). While Clare expressed affection for the Established Church and other denominations on various occasions, Houghton-Walker brings together a vast array of evidence to show that any exploration of Clare's religious faith must go beyond pulpit and chapel

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John Clare (13 July 1793 – 20 May 1864) was an English poet. The son of a farm labourer, he became known for his celebrations of the English countryside and sorrows at its disruption. His poetry underwent major re-evaluation in the late 20th century: he is now often seen as one of the major 19th-century poets. His biographer Jonathan Bate called Clare "the greatest labouring-class poet that England has ever produced

Addressing a neglected aspect of John Clare's history, Sarah Houghton-Walker explores Clare's poetry within the framework of his faith and the religious context in which he lived. While Clare expressed affection for the Established Church and other denominations on various occasions, Houghton-Walker brings together a vast array of evidence to show that any exploration of Clare's religious faith must go beyond pulpit and chapel. Phenomena that Clare himself defines as elements of faith include ghosts, witches, and literature, as well as concepts such as selfhood, Eden, eternity, childhood, and evil. Together with more traditional religious expressions, these apparently disparate features of Clare's spirituality are revealed to be of fundamental significance to his poetry, and it becomes evident that Clare's experiences can tell us much about the experience of 'religion', 'faith', and 'belief' in the period more generally. A distinguishing characteristic of Houghton-Walker's approach is her conviction that one must take into account all aspects of Clare's faith or else risk misrepresenting it. Her book thus engages not only with the facts of Clare's religious habits but also with the ways in which he was literally inspired, and with how that inspiration is connected to his intimations of divinity, to his vision of nature, and thus to his poetry. Belief, mediated through the idea of vision, is found to be implicated in Clare's experiences and interpretations of the natural world and is thus shown to be critical to the content of his verse.