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Talking into the Ear of a Donkey: Poems ePub download

by Robert Bly

  • Author: Robert Bly
  • ISBN: 0393080226
  • ISBN13: 978-0393080223
  • ePub: 1796 kb | FB2: 1584 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Poetry
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (May 23, 2011)
  • Pages: 107
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 654
  • Format: lit rtf docx mbr
Talking into the Ear of a Donkey: Poems ePub download

American writer Robert Bly is regarded as one of the legends of. .Talking into the Ear of a Donkey, . Norton (New York, NY), 2011.

American writer Robert Bly is regarded as one of the legends of contemporary poetry, according to David Biespel, the prototypical non-modernist the on. The book showed Bly attempting to unite public and private realms in poetry, a project that would continue to influence both his own work and his role as a public poet. In 1966, Bly cofounded American Writers against the Vietnam War, led much of the opposition among writers to that war, and even contributed his National Book Award prize money to the antiwar effort.

poems, while spiritual, celebrate the worldly delights: shining fish, giant moose and bird song. I have loved and admired Robert Bly's work for many years, but I have to admit, I was discouraged by the mediocrity of his "middle period" poetry, perhaps due to his being too focused, at the time, on "Iron John" and the "Men's Movement," even though I was an enthusiastic participant myself.

In the title poem, Bly addresses the "donkey"-possibly poetry itself-that has carried him through a writing life of.

In the title poem, Bly addresses the "donkey"-possibly poetry itself-that has carried him through a writing life of more than six decades. from "Talking into the Ear of a Donkey". What has happened to the spring," I cry, "and With poems ranging from the ghazal form to free verse, Talking into the Ear of a Donkey is Robert Bly's richest and most varied collection. In the title poem, Bly addresses the "donkey"-possibly poetry itself-that has carried him through a writing life of more than six decades.

Don’t be afraid The great lettuce of the world Is all around us. ― Robert Bly, Talking into the Ear of a Donkey: Poems. We have never understood how birds manage to fly, Nor who the genius is who makes up dreams, Now how heaven and earth can appear in a poem. Robert Bly, Talking into the Ear of a Donkey: Poems.

Talking into the Ear of a Donkey (2011). By Tomas Tranströmer. All poems by Tomas Tranströmer have been translated into English by Robert Bly, except where noted, and in most cases appear in The Half-Finished Heaven: The Best Poems of Tomas Tranströmer, selected and translated from the Swedish by Robert Bly, and published in 2001 by Graywolf Press.

By the end of summer, she Has dipped her head into Rainy Lake a thousand times. Robert, you’ve wasted so much of your life Sitting indoors to write poems. Would you Do that again? I would, a thousand times. Robert Bly: A Thousand Years of Joy. 5 December 2019 at 11:15 ·. This December marks Robert's 93rd trip around the Sun.

This book is an ambitious collecting of over 190 poems not included in Robert Bly’s recent selected poems, Stealing .

This book is an ambitious collecting of over 190 poems not included in Robert Bly’s recent selected poems, Stealing Sugar from the Castle. Ranging back to some of his earliest publications in the early 1960s, Like the New Moon gathers work from many of Bly’s smaller, more obscure publications, including a number of poems that have never before appeared in any book. Reflecting Robert Bly's lifelong fascination with poetic form, the poems in Talking into the Ear of a Donkey range from free verse to Bly's invented form, the ramage, to his American version of the Mideastern ghazal.

the most recent in a line of great American transcendentalist writers. -The New York Times With poems ranging from the ghazal form to free verse, Talking into the Ear of a Donkey is Robert Bly's richest and most varied collection

the most recent in a line of great American transcendentalist writers. -The New York Times With poems ranging from the ghazal form to free verse, Talking into the Ear of a Donkey is Robert Bly's richest and most varied collection.

He’s also written three books of his own ghazal-like poems, each one . These passages are all from the more recent book, Talking into the Ear of a Donkey. I’m ignoring line breaks.

He’s also written three books of his own ghazal-like poems, each one worse than the last, but all three of ’em worth having and reading, at least for me. I see these three books as a crazy mix of some of the most genuinely excellent stuff being done in American poetry, and some of the most affected and sickening. Now, insofar as Bly really does have some genuinely nifty cosmic intuitions, he writes lines that are as bold and subversive and memorable as anything you’d find in an English translation of Hafez or Ghalib.

"[Robert Bly] is . . . the most recent in a line of great American transcendentalist writers."―The New York Times

With poems ranging from the ghazal form to free verse, Talking into the Ear of a Donkey is Robert Bly's richest and most varied collection. In the title poem, Bly addresses the "donkey"―possibly poetry itself―that has carried him through a writing life of more than six decades. from "Talking into the Ear of a Donkey"       "What has happened to the spring,"       I cry, "and our legs that were so joyful       In the bobblings of April?" "Oh, never mind       About all that," the donkey       Says. "Just take hold of my mane, so you       Can lift your lips closer to my hairy ears."
Tiv
Bly is now in his eighties, hence these might be termed "late poems" as they often have a reflective edge. This book, however, is a good, short, introduction to his oeuvre and concerns, containing poems in many of the styles that have characterized his poems from over the years. There are the spare, almost haiku-like, poems about nature that were typical of his early work in Silence in the Snowy Fields: Poems (Wesleyan poetry program), as well as his more recent forays into poems based the Persian form, the ghazal, that were used in his previous two collections. The one missing form that Bly has explored in the past is the prose poems.

True to his voice, the poems in the book are strong in images - a favourite of mine being "lobster's playing bone guitars." The range of subjects is wide including nature, ageing, family dynamics, and psychology. The title poem is a humorous take on the task of writing. A few more reflect his political concerns. Those familiar Bly over the years will recognize some poems here as rewrites from earlier collections- another typical trait- particularly in the fourth section which are ramages, a form he has invented.

If a criticism is to be raised, it is occasionally an image of phase seems to strive for effect, but generally Bly's imagination has not dimmed with age. There is a joy and sparkle in the language that combines physicality, reflectiveness and his personal mysticism. There is plenty to delight fans, who will not feel let down.
Malodora
I have loved and admired Robert Bly's work for many years, but I have to admit, I was discouraged by the mediocrity of his "middle period" poetry, perhaps due to his being too focused, at the time, on "Iron John" and the "Men's Movement," even though I was an enthusiastic participant myself.

That being said, I am ecstatic in reading this collection and realizing that Bly, now well into his eighties, is producing some of his best poems in years. Much like the aged W.B. Yeats, Bly effortlessly exhibits, in the best of these late poems, the fruits of a lifetime of observing, reading, studying, & contemplating the rich, multifaceted nature of life on this planet--human and non-human, good and bad, esoteric and exoteric. I cannot begin to express how deeply moved and encouraged I have been in reading many of these poems. "My Father at Forty" is a specially strong example of what Wordsworth referred to as "emotion recollected in tranquility." There is so much honest emotion compacted into a few deceptively quiet lines, that I find it almost impossible to read this poem without weeping.

That's just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the poetic riches here. Bly's well-known transcendentalist meditations are well on display, but, again, exhibiting his mature, un-ostentatious knowledge of the world's great wisdom traditions. I especially love the last lines of "The Big-Nostrilled Moose": "Slowly, obstinately, we retrieve the pleasures/The Fathers, angry with the Gnostics, threw away."

So much historical, theological, philosophical, and cultural significance can be unpacked from those two simple but heavily laden verses.

Needless to say, I heartily endorse this volume, and, for novices who are interested in further exploring Robert Bly's poetry, I urge you to obtain a copy of the new and selected poems, "Stealing Sugar from the Castle."
Hunaya
Well, I love donkeys and this is a collection of all kinds of poems, just one about a donkey, which was good. There were many poems about one's birth family that were uncomfortable for those not having a good early experience. I sent it back with no problems.
Perdana
A rich collection permeated with a deep sense of the transience of creation and, at the same time, a celebration of what is here and now. I agree that this is Bly's best collection in many years. So many lines bring delight and wonder with Bly's wise gift of putting images, metaphor and symbol together in unexpected ways.

One of my favorite stanzas:

It's all right if we can't remain cheerful all day.
The task we have accepted is to go down
To renew our friendship with the ruined things.
kewdiepie
I've been a Robert Bly, the poet, fan for more than 20 years. I'm jealous of the donkey and yet feel privileged to be included on the conversation. Speaking bravely for others: those of us who don't subscribe to the various magazines in which these poems first appeared are happy to have them here. Have read them through twice in warm weather. Now that it is snowing the 3rd read will give hints to other inflections in these poems.
Nilador
This is a book that will bring you back to its pages again and again, especially after a long day of beginning to believe that Shakespeare was right, and life is indeed a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, and signifying nothing. Not that there isn't plenty of wonderful sound and some Yankee fury in this book. But the whispers into the donkey's ear? you'd have to read them for yourself. It is obvious that the poet has hoed quite a few long rows. And that way is far too long without the faith of Abraham....
Cerekelv
Great insightful and beautiful poetry from a modern master.
I always love Robert Bly, his terse, sweet language and knowledge of worldwide metaphors. Only four stars, because I didn't get as much out of this one as some of his earlier work.
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