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Das Nibelungenlied: Song of the Nibelungs ePub download

by Professor Burton Raffel

  • Author: Professor Burton Raffel
  • ISBN: 030011320X
  • ISBN13: 978-0300113204
  • ePub: 1978 kb | FB2: 1420 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Poetry
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; 1 edition (November 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 384
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 255
  • Format: mobi lrf lit lrf
Das Nibelungenlied: Song of the Nibelungs ePub download

Das Nibelungenlied: Song. has been added to your Cart. Das Nibelungenlied is one of the underappreciated classics of western literature.

Das Nibelungenlied: Song. Burton Raffel is Distinguished Professor of Arts and Humanities Emeritus and professor of English emeritus, University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He lives in Lafayette. An inspiration and source for everything from Wagner to Tolkien, the epic was first written in the 12th century, copied extensively throughout the High Middle Ages, and then virtually disappeared until the 1700s.

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Das Nibelungenlied: Song of the Nibelungs (Paperback)

Das Nibelungenlied: Song of the Nibelungs (Paperback). Professor Burton Raffel (translator), Michael Dirda (foreword), Edward R. Haymes (author of introduction). In his foreword to the book, Michael Dirda observes that the story "could be easily updated to describe the downfall of a Mafia crime family, something like The Godfather, with swords. Raffel stays true to the style and form of the "Nibelungenlied," a wonderful text that deserves a much wider audience in the English-speaking world. -Bettina Bildhauer, University of St. Andrews - Bettina Bildhauer "Burton Raffel's "Nibelungenlied "deserves many enthralled readers. -Michael Dirda, from the Foreword.

Burton Raffel, trans. Das Nibelungenlied: Song of the Nibelungs. Burton Raffel brings to life for the first time the great German epic poem that inspired Richard Wagner's opera tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen and J. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2008.

Burton Raffel is Distinguished Professor of Arts and Humanities Emeritus and professor of English emeritus, University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He lives in Lafayette

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. His many works of translation include Voltaire's Candide, the narrative poems of Chrétien de Troyes, and Poems and Prose from the Old English, all published by Yale University Press.

Nibelungenlied, Das book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Nibelungenlied, Das: Song of the Nibelungs as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Das Nibelungenlied Song of the Nibelungs Burton Raffel. Written around the year 1200, The Nibelungenlied is one of the glories of European literature. The epic is based on tales. His many works of translation include Voltaire’s Candide, the narrative poems of Chrétien de Troyes, and Poems and Prose from the Old English, all published by Yale University Press. to the fifth-century destruction of the Burgundian kingdom by the Huns.

If you want to enjoy the Song of the Nibelungs, you must try to do one thing: forget Wagner. Books In this article. Professor Burton Raffel.

Peter von Cornelius, Hagen versenkt den Nibelungenhort, 1859. If you want to enjoy the Song of the Nibelungs, you must try to do one thing: forget Wagner.

The Nibelungenlied (Middle High German: Der Nibelunge liet or Der Nibelunge nôt), translated as The Song of the Nibelungs, is an epic poem written around 1200 in Middle High German. Its anonymous poet was likely from the region of Passau. The Nibelungenlied is based on an oral tradition that has some of its origin in historic events and individuals of the 5th and 6th centuries and that spread throughout almost all of Germanic-speaking Europe.

Das Nibelungenlied : Song of the Nibelungs. By (author) Professor Burton Raffel.

No poem in German literature is so well known and studied in Germany and Europe as the 800-year-old Das Nibelungenlied. In the English-speaking world, however, the poem has remained little known, languishing without an adequate translation. This wonderful new translation by eminent translator Burton Raffel brings the epic poem to life in English for the first time, rendering it in verse that does full justice to the original High Middle German. His translation underscores the formal aspects of the poem and preserves its haunting beauty. Often called the German lliad, Das Nibelungenlied is a heroic epic both national in character and sweeping in scope. The poem moves inexorably from romance through tragedy to holocaust. It portrays the existential struggles and downfall of an entire people, the Burgundians, in a military conflict with the Huns and their king. In his foreword to the book, Michael Dirda observes that the story “could be easily updated to describe the downfall of a Mafia crime family, something like The Godfather, with swords.” The tremendous appeal of Das Nibelungenlied throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries is reflected in such works as Richard Wagner’s opera tetralogy Der Ring des Nibelungen, Fritz Lang’s two-part film Die Nibelungen, and, more recently, J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings.  
Bumand
Burton Raffel's new translation of Das Nibelungenlied, the foremost epic of German literature, stands head and shoulders above every other translation available today. Fast-paced and clear, this English Nibelungenlied gives new life to the old Siegfried legend. One thing that immediately sets Raffel's translation apart from others is that he has chosen to translate the epic into poetry. As a result, his translation perfectly captures the flavor of the original.

Das Nibelungenlied is one of the underappreciated classics of western literature. An inspiration and source for everything from Wagner to Tolkien, the epic was first written in the 12th century, copied extensively throughout the High Middle Ages, and then virtually disappeared until the 1700s. Its popularity bloomed again during the romantic era, when poets keen on the medieval romance and scholars seeking a Germanic national literature found a common inspiration in the rediscovered epic.

None of this, of course, is apparent while reading the poem. But a foreword, introduction, and translator's notes--all wonderfully concise--give the reader all the information necessary to appreciating the poem's history with none of the pain found in dry, scholarly studies. Far from boring, the introduction and notes actually enhance the reader's enjoyment of the poem.

Raffel's translation is a thing of beauty. Comparison with the original Middle High German shows that he took great pains to balance a literal, accurate translation with poetic English verse. Raffel's endnotes to the translation give the reader some sense of his goals in translating the book--not only to match the simple, unadorned wording of the original, but also to render its quick-moving poetic style in English. His hard work paid off.

Whatever your interest in Das Nibelungenlied and whether or not you read the scholarly extras found in this book, Raffel's translation is exciting, brisk, and a joy to read.

Highly recommended.
Usic
I had to buy this book for a class I took last year and had no idea of what to expect...I started reading this, and could not put it down! Frankly, I don't think that's something to scoff at, considering it is a 300 page 13th century poem! Usually, when reading something that old, one finds that the translator has insisted on maintaining the rhyme or form of the original, which is honestly quite exasperating for the modern reader. This one, while mainting the visual appearance of the poem with the mid-line and end-line breaks, reads exactly as prose and is so much more comfortable to work with!

I ended up reading through three books of translation theory written by Burton Raffel in an effort to analze and critique this book for a second class I was taking (one on translation), and really wish I could type up some of the points I came across in my research. Suffice it to say, I truly believe this is one of the best English translations of the Nibelungenlied there is (and I have read through a fair number of them), particularly when considering the modern reader.

There may be complaints by those who feel that the poem should be maintained with its "original" rhyme and form, and if that's truly what you are looking for, there are plenty of other translations out there that deliver this. Raffel's deviates only in that aspect, and is otherwise quite perfect at retaining the mood and content of the original written poem, and does so in a way that the modern reader can appreciate and comprehend.

This is a piece of literature taken from an era of history that we can never really grasp, since it is so different from ours, and yet I think the heart of the story remains extraordinarily clear and accessible for anyone today. I really cannot recommend this book enough.
komandante
This is an excellent book. The prose verse translated in English was a delight to read in particular since I study both languages.
Xwnaydan
This may well be a wonderful translation. I love Raffel's Beowulf and am currently reading his version of Canterbury Tales. But I won't be reading this book on my Kindle. Instead, I just went to a local bookstore and bought a paper copy.

Why?

Simple! All the introductory portions of the book are fine--standard Kindle formatting, etc. But the poem appears to be in some unreadable fixed format font. Most every set of four lines is in a different font size, varying from about the smallest standard Kindle font to something much smaller. Yes, much smaller than the smallest Kindle font. It is bad enough jolting the eye/brain combination with a font size change every four lines. But the largest of the changing fonts needs a magnifying glass.

Change the font size, you say. Well, I tried. But it changed the font size of the introduction, the foreword, etc. It didn't affect the poem in the least.

So I will read this in paper form. And won't be able to have it for reference on my Kindle. Oh well. Sometimes technology ain't all it's cracked up to be.

Additional information: I bought the paper version. I am well over half way through. The paper version lives up to my expectations. This is a very good translation. Very readable. Easy to understand. Raffel creates poetry that sounds good to read to yourself. I have an electronic version (a different translator) which includes rhymes for all the lines and results in a much more stilted presentation. This is definitely better. So, I recommend the book, just not on the Kindle.
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