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Beowulf (Bloom's Guides (Hardcover)) ePub download

by Sterling Professor of the Humanities Harold Bloom

  • Author: Sterling Professor of the Humanities Harold Bloom
  • ISBN: 0791094324
  • ISBN13: 978-0791094327
  • ePub: 1304 kb | FB2: 1181 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Poetry
  • Publisher: Blooms Literary Criticism; Annotated edition edition (July 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 112
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 538
  • Format: lit txt mbr doc
Beowulf (Bloom's Guides (Hardcover)) ePub download

Harold Bloom is Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University.

Harold Bloom is Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University. His most recent books include Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, a 1998 National Book Award finalist; How to Read and Why; Genius: A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds; Hamlet: Poem Unlimited; Where Shall Wisdom be Found; and Jesus and Yahweh: The Names Divine. In 1999, Professor Bloom received the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Criticism. He has also received the International Prize of Catalonia, the Alfonso Reyes Prize of Mexico, and the Hans Christian Andersen Bicentennial Prize of Denmark.

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Bloom's Guides provides comprehensive reading and study guides for some of the world's most important literary masterpieces. Sampling key critical perspectives on each literary work, this series provides insightful information about the author and the book's characters, serving as an ideal starting point for further study. Series: Bloom's Guides (Hardcover).

Harold Bloom (July 11, 1930 – October 14, 2019) was an American literary critic and the Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University. Following the publication of his first book in 1959, Bloom wrote more than fifty books, including twenty books of literary criticism, several books discussing religion, and a novel.

Harold Bloom, Sterling Professor of the Humanities Harold Bloom. Bloom's theories have changed the way that critics think of literary tradition and has also focused his attentions on history and the Bible. Infobase Publishing, 2009 - 112 sayfa. He is one of the most famous critics in the world and considered an expert in many fields. In 2010 he became a founding patron of Ralston College, a new institution in Savannah, Georgia, that focuses on primary texts.

Though Harold Bloom wished to distance himself from culture war . Harold Bloom on the Ghastly Decline of the Humanities (and on Obama’s Poetry). Josh Jones is a writer and musician based in Durham, NC.

Though Harold Bloom wished to distance himself from culture war polemics, he has unapologetically practiced what Allan Bloom preached, teaching the Canonical "great books" of literature and religion and opposing all manner of critics on the left, whom he lumps together in the phrase the School of Resentment. For all of Bloom’s ornery defensiveness, his list is surprisingly inclusive, as well as-for Fruman-surprisingly idiosyncratic. Follow him at gness.

Bloom's Literary Guide to Paris: Mike Gerrard, Sterling Professor of the Humanities Harold Bloom: Books. Arts & Photography Books Blooms Literary Guide to Paris Arts & Photography Blooms Literary Guide to Paris Books Blooms Literary Guide to Paris Arts & Photography Books Blooms Literary Guide to Paris Arts & Photography Books Arts & Photography Books Blooms Literary Guide to Paris. Пройдите тренинг по личностному росту.

Harold Bloom is Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University

Harold Bloom is Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University. Educated at Cornell and Yale universities, he is the author of 30 books, including Shelley's Mythmaking (1959), The Visionary Company (1961), Blake's Apocalypse (1963), Yeats (1970), A Map of Misreading (1975), Kabbalah and Criticism (1975), Agon: Toward a Theory of Revisionism (1982), The American Religion (1992). The Western Canon (1994), Omens of Millennium: The Gnosis of Angels, Dreams, and Resurrection (1996), and Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (1998), a 1998 National Book Award finalist

Shelves: non-fiction. This slim volume of literary analysis added a lot to the reading of Beowulf. Harold Bloom was an American literary critic and the Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University. Since the publication of his first book in 1959, Bloom has written more than forty books of literary criticism, several books discussing religion, and one novel. Other books in the series. Bloom's Notes (10 books). Books by Harold Bloom

Composed around 1000 CE, this title is among the longest-known poems written in Old English. It tells of the heroic deeds of the great warrior Beowulf, and contains both Christian and pagan symbolism.
Nuliax
In studying the history of Beowulf criticism, it is important to be aware on the one hand of Ker's critique of Beowulf as a poorly structured non-masterpiece, and Tolkien's influential defense of the artistic and structural merit of the poem.

This anthology of Beowulf criticism is exceedingly thin, and while it provides Ker and Tolkien a few paragraphs each to make their case, important portions of Ker and Tolkien's analyses are omitted.

Although Bloom calls Tolkien's essay a "landmark" he doesn't say in what way it was a landmark. Tolkien drove home the point that Beowulf was a masterpiece, and that has been the general consensus ever since.

That being said, the anthology features the big names in Beowulf criticism, including Kemp Malone and E. Talbot Donaldson. This thin volume is definitely worth the time spent reading it.

When I first started reading this book I was a complete Beowulf neophyte, and I didn't understand what they were discussing. I put the book down and returned to it several years of Beowulf study later.

I recommend that people read and reread Beowulf several times before reading this anthology of criticism. Or at least that they return to this anthology again after becoming familiar with the sections and structure of Beowulf.
Dainris
The concept of the Modern Critical Interpretation series is an excellent one. The editor, Harold Bloom, a renowned scholar in his own right, has assembled the best literary criticism of a large number of important works.
If you want to get a deeper insight into Beowulf as a work of literature, this book is an excellent way to do it. Some of the essays are a bit challenging--the book is for the fairly serious Beowulf fan. Seamus Heaney's translation really got me into a work which I've been meaning to get to for a long time. This collection of essays took me the rest of the way--it told me all I wanted to know about Beowulf as work of literature. Think of it as a senior-level college text book.
The essays give the reader some valuable insights into the language, but you don't have to know Old English to appreciate it. But a willingness to learn about a few of the words will help.
"Difficult" classics usually pay back many-fold the effort one puts into studying them. Beowulf and these essays are definitely worth that time and effort.
Ferne
Altrough its a book covered in the 12 grade it is book not only for seniors. Its a wonderful epic that takes us back to beliefs and myths of Anglo-Saxons (the same folks that are ancestors of the king arthur). If you like epic stories, if you like the dark ages, if you are interested how the life could be back then, then its a book for you. Good reading...
Samulkree
When I had to switch my college study to English, I was a bit frightened of all the reading before me. This book told me that I was in for a REAL exciting journey towards my B.A. "Beowulf" is no less than an exquisite masterpiece. It is just the right length, the images are well drawn, the language is well used, and the plot is more complex than we may have thought. The setting prior to Beowulf's entrance is well constructed. Beowulf's character is well prepared upon his entrance. Unferth is well placed. He reveals to us that despite Beowulf's piety and courage, he is not a flawless hero. He suffers from excessive pride. Beowulf's fight with Grendel offers suspense and captivation, and we are even allowed a small amount of sympathy for Grendel when he escapes only to die later. We are then told the story of Siegmund, and his fall over excessive pride foreshadows Beowulf's fall. (History repeats itself.) Grendel's mother than comes to avenge her son. (This goes way beyond a simple chapter.) She is a threat that must be dealt with, but it is difficult not to feel sorry for her. (She is after all a mother in sorrow over her son's death.) Although Unferth rebuked Beowulf earlier, he joins with Beowulf for a common cause, and later, Beowulf ADMITS that the battle was very close. (He is not invincible.) King Hrothgar then warns Beowulf of excessive pride. Later the dragon attacks, and Beowulf displays excessive pride (the very thing King Hrothgar warned him against). In this battle Beowulf does fight with courage, and Wiglaf displays touching loyalty to Beowulf in this battle where Beowulf dies. Beowulf's funeral is a fitting end for this masterpiece. So we have a hero with strength, virtues, and flaws, suspense, well organization, well drawn supporting characters, complex villains, and even an element of mystery! Who was this author?
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