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Tristia (Loeb Classical Library) ePub download

by A.L. Wheeler,Ovid

  • Author: A.L. Wheeler,Ovid
  • ISBN: 0434991511
  • ISBN13: 978-0434991518
  • ePub: 1560 kb | FB2: 1340 kb
  • Category: Poetry
  • Publisher: William Heinemann Ltd (December 1924)
  • Pages: 555
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 428
  • Format: docx rtf lrf txt
Tristia (Loeb Classical Library) ePub download

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BCE–17 CE), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and law at Rome. Translated by A. L. Wheeler. Revised by G. P. Goold. Loeb Classical Library 151.

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BCE–17 CE), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and law at Rome. Later he did considerable public service there, and otherwise devoted himself to poetry and to society. Famous at first, he offended the emperor Augustus by his Ars Amatoria, and was banished because of this work and some other reason unknown to us, and dwelt in the cold and primitive town of Tomis on the Black Sea. He continued writing poetry, a kindly man, leading a temperate life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1924.

The Loeb Classical Library (LCL; named after James Loeb /loʊb/) is a series of books, originally published by Heinemann in London, today by Harvard University Press.

Loeb Classical Library n. 51, with an English translation by Arthur Wheeler. Copious pencilled notes, particularly on Ex Ponto Liber primus. Damage & loss at edge of p. 37-240 (text not affected).

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BCE-17 CE), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and law at Rome. Later he did considerable public service there, and otherwise devoted himself to poetry and to society

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BCE-17 CE), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and law at Rome.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage . Loeb Classical Library L130.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. movies All video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library.

Ovid Volume VI Loeb Classical Library 151. Tristia. Famous at first, he offended the emperor Augustus with his Ars Amatoria (Art of Love).

Ovid on Reading: Reading Ovid. Reception in Ovid Tristia II. Journal of Roman Studies, Vol. 89, Issue. Ovid, tristia . –8 revisited. The Classical Quarterly, Vol. 66, Issue. 02, p. 598. CrossRef. Export citation Request permission.

L001 (1912) Apollonius Rhodius: Argonautica (transcription project). L002 (1912) Appian: Roman History, Volume I, Books 1–. (external scan). L003 (1912) Appian: Roman History, Volume II, Books . –12 (external scan). L004 (1913) Appian: Roman History, Volume III, The Civil Wars, Books 1–. 6 (external scan). L005 (1913) Appian: Roman History, Volume IV, The Civil Wars, Books . 7–5 (external scan). L006 (1912) Catullus; Tibullus; Tiberianus (possibly): Pervigilium Veneris.

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Yeah, these poems are weepy and whiny and repetitive, and most readers will perceive as cloying the occasional patches of goal-oriented flattery (though they are balanced by passages expressing what seem to be sincere intimate emotions and, Ovid being Ovid, the occasional snarky sarcasm). But in the context of Ovid's total output, they represent a triumphant return to form and a fitting conclusion to a great career. If the accepted chronology for the surviving works is correct, after "Metamorphoses" Ovid seems to have gotten stuck in a bit of a rut--see my reviews for the Loeb and Oxford editions of "Fasti" for my own (not universally accepted) estimate of that unfinished poem as "going through the motions" rather than expressing the emotions. Ovid's exile was no doubt a disaster on a personal level but it got him on a new track as a poet. The "Fasti" was a pale reflection of the "Metamorphoses" but "Tristia" and "Ex Ponto" are like nothing else that survives from ancient Latin poetry. One might compare them in fact to the "confessional poetry" of W. D. Snodgrass ("Heart's Needle," in which his divorce and separation from his young daughter assume the function that Ovid's exile assumes in the works under discussion). These poems represent the closest we get in ancient literature to a deeply felt autobiography until we get to Augustine's of four centuries later. For these reasons, the works in this volume may speak to modern readers (who generally tend to like their poetry personal) much more directly than anything by Horace or Virgil. The "Metamorphoses" and "Amores" are still Ovid's best, though! As always, the Loeb edition provides a valuable service by making the Latin text available, for not much money, next to a serviceable if hardly artistic English translation. See my review of the Peter Green translation for my recommendation of a more poetic alternative.
Elizabeth
In antique Latin literature, writings composed by great men in exile evolved, over time, into the consolation genre. In utilizing this method, the author usually addressed his far away loved ones with soft elegaic poems or epistles intended to be therapeutic to both the sender and recipient. At times, this genre could even take on a sarcastic and vituperative tone. Enemies, rivals, and unfaithful friends or lovers, were commonly exposed to the exiled author's wrath. Some major figures in this tradition were illustrious men like Cicero, Seneca and Boethius. Within the scope of this epoch, Ovid plays no minor role. For the Tristia and the Pontic Epistles influenced many subsequent Latin authors, while continuing to be widely read and highly regarded throughout the Middle Ages. For certain, in the most unanimously favoured book of the Middle Ages, the Consolation of Philosophy, significant traces of Ovidian influence are quite apparent in the prose and poetry portions of Boethius' work. So the overall value of this collection of letters should not be taken lightly. But the high-standing of the Tristia and Ex Ponto within the tradition of Latin literature is not the works only claim to merit. From this volume, we learn much about Ovid's character, while we are left with a sufficient impression about his place of exile. Also, his short autobiography is invaluable: it furnishes much material about his life and family history that otherwise would have been lost. Other historical content will be of use to the historian. For the poet, there are some pointers on how poetry should be written, and there are some helpful first-hand allusions about great poets like Ennius Statius, Virgil, Tibullus and Propertius. The poems themselves are very good and enjoyable to read; the only draw-back to them is the subject-matter, which becomes redundant and almost pathetic if read in large doses. However, this was not a fault, but rather a matter of Ovid's condition. He adjusts his Muse to fit his situation. In exile, he writes consolatory poems. Ovid himself points this out many times in these epistles. This volume is highly recommended. The Tristia and the Pontic Epistles will help students of the liberal studies cultivate many virtues of character, taste, and literary style, which will later prove to be beneficial to all facets of society.
Umge
Ovid is sincerely sorry, we think, and he wants to get back into the good graces of his emperor. Alas, he does not get recalled from banishment. This is another must for the Loeb library and the must have for those who are looking for Ovid's autobiography.
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