» » Love in a Cold Climate

Love in a Cold Climate ePub download

by Nancy Mitford

  • Author: Nancy Mitford
  • ISBN: 185089003X
  • ISBN13: 978-1850890034
  • ePub: 1239 kb | FB2: 1420 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Isis Large Print Books; Large Print edition (June 1, 1985)
  • Pages: 348
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 636
  • Format: docx mobi rtf lrf
Love in a Cold Climate ePub download

Nancy Mitford (1904–73) was born in London, the eldest child of the second Baron Redesdale. She followed The Pursuit of Love with Love in a Cold Climate (1949), The Blessing (1951) and Don’t Tell Alfred (1960).

Nancy Mitford (1904–73) was born in London, the eldest child of the second Baron Redesdale. Her childhood in a large, remote country house with her five sisters and one brother is recounted in the early chapters of The Pursuit of Love (1945), which, according to the author, is largely autobiographical. She also wrote four works of biography: Madame de Pompadour, first published to great acclaim in 1954, Voltaire in Love, The Sun King and Frederick the Great.

Love in a Cold Climate book. One of Nancy Mitford’s most beloved novels, Love in a Cold Climate is a sparkling romantic comedy that vividly evokes the lost glamour of aristocratic life in England between the wars. Polly Hampton has long been groomed for the perfect marriage by her mother, the fearsome and ambitious Lady Montdore.

Love in a Cold Climate and The Pursuit of Love are great fun. Nancy Mitford chronicles tales of eccentric English aristocrats in the 30's and 40's with great wit and style

Love in a Cold Climate and The Pursuit of Love are great fun. Nancy Mitford chronicles tales of eccentric English aristocrats in the 30's and 40's with great wit and style. And the best part is that most of it was patterned closely after her own family! Read In the Pursuit of Love first, then Love in a Cold Climate.

Love in a Cold Climate is a novel by Nancy Mitford, first published in 1949. The title is a direct quotation from George Orwell's novel Keep the Aspidistra Flying (1936). Love in a Cold Climate is a companion volume to The Pursuit of Love. The time frame of Love in a Cold Climate is the same as The Pursuit of Love, but the focus is on a different set of characters. Fanny remains the fictional narrator. In The Pursuit of Love, Fanny narrates the story of her cousin Linda Radlett.

SUMMARY: One of Nancy Mitford’s most beloved novels, Love in a Cold Climate is a sparkling romantic comedy that vividly evokes the lost glamour of aristocratic life in England between the wars. But Polly, with her stunning good looks and impeccable connections, is bored by the monotony of her glittering debut season in London

Whereas all the other rooms at Hampton were classical in feeling, the tower rooms were exaggeratedly Gothic, the Gothic of fairy-story illustrations.

Whereas all the other rooms at Hampton were classical in feeling, the tower rooms were exaggeratedly Gothic, the Gothic of fairy-story illustrations. ace had pinnacles; the wallpaper was a design of scrolls and the windows were casements. An extensive work of modernisation had taken place all over the house while the family was in India, and looking round I saw that in one of the cupboards there was now a tiled bathroom.

Love in a Cold Climateis the sequel to Nancy Mitford's bestselling novel The Pursuit of Love. How lovely - green velvet and silver. I call that a dream, so soft and delicious, to. She rubbed a fold of the skirt against her cheek

Love in a Cold Climateis the sequel to Nancy Mitford's bestselling novel The Pursuit of Love. She rubbed a fold of the skirt against her cheek. Mine's silver lame, it smells like a bird cage when it gets hot but I do love it. Aren't you thankful evening skirts are long again?' Ah, the dresses! But oh, the monotony of the Season, with its endless run of glittering balls.

Love in a Cold Climate [hardcover] Mitford, Nancy [Jun 01, 1985]
Umrdana
This is an hilarious satire on the British upper class set in the period between the wars. The attitudes and snobbishness of the upper class taken to the nth degree.

Polly Montdore, daughter of one of England's wealthiest families, shows no inclination to marry despite many attempts to match make by her mother, that is until she announces to friends and family she is going to marry her recently widowed uncle. This is where the trouble starts.

The story is told through the eyes of Polly's distant cousin, Fanny,who comes from a titled family but without the immense wealth. Our narrator fills us in on the daily lives of the upper classes in great detail and keeps it amusing throughout.

Polly's mother is a wonderful snob and a highlight of the book.

Back in the Long Gallery some of the women went upstairs to 'powder their' noses. Lady Montdore was scornful. ' I go in the morning,' she said,' and that is that. I don't have to be let out like a dog at intervals, thank goodness- there;s nothing so common, to my mind".

or this gem:

And if I might offer you a little advice Fanny, it would be to read fewer books,dear, and make your house slightly more comfortable. that is what a man appreciates in the long run.'

I laughed all the way through this and it got even better when the delightfully camp Cedric appears. This is a delight, even the introduction by Alan Cumming is great.

I also recommend Mitford's collection of letters between her and Evelyn Waugh, laugh out loud funny and very pointed.
Groll
Beautifully witty and succinct. truly a masterpiece of social commentary. Flawlessly engaging, fluid and warm in her very English inherent coolness, Mitford makes one feel very much an insider through her observations growing up part of a eccentric, yet conservative, noteworthy family during the war. At times riotously hilarious, and others tragically sad, the vivid wit and unique charm of Mitford's observational style are simply unparalleled. Probably the best book ever written. by the greatest author of all time. Arguably the best of, but still well supported by other gems in her catalogue, such as Pursuit of Love, Don't Tell Alfred and the Blessing. Inherently, irreverently, grand, eloquent and most elegant books, one can't help but feeling some of the sheen rubs off upon reading. Massively enjoyable and entirely recommended.
Usishele
Reading the favorite books of the previous century can be very illuminating. Who would expect to find most of the plot elements of the TV series Downton Abbey--minus the servants' dramas--in Nancy Mitford's novel? It's all here, the magnificent house and estate that is beloved by family members and their friends and hangers-on, the male line inheritance dilemma, the unsuitable love affairs, scandal, links to royalty. The difference is the tone and language. Mitford is more satirical and bitter. The pace is slower, minor characters are stereotypes. It's a very revealing book about British society, especially if read with a companion biography of Nancy Mitford.
LoboThommy
Love in a Cold Climate and The Pursuit of Love are great fun. Nancy Mitford chronicles tales of eccentric English aristocrats in the 30's and 40's with great wit and style. And the best part is that most of it was patterned closely after her own family! Read In the Pursuit of Love first, then Love in a Cold Climate. You won't be sorry!
Jelar
Funny, witty, snarky. A great read while traveling, and this is after having done the same twenty years ago. The novel still seemed fresh, and a real page turner. The romantic ties are some what contrived, but-- same with Jane Austen.
Super P
Oh yeah! British upper-class family is satirized in this amusing novel. It is a great read. Don't know how I missed reading Nancy Mitford earlier in life, but I am glad to have found her now - I feel her work just doesn't go out of style, even though it represents a particular caste and historical circumstance. I also read a biography of the Mitford sisters and 2 other Nancy Mitford novels - all worthwhile and with a deeper message than appears on the surface.
Qudanilyr
Nancy is my favourite of the six Mitford sisters, a brilliant, mordant novelist in the style of Evelyn Waugh. Like Waugh, she is often imitated, but unlike her imitators, she lived in the world she describes so wittily, and lived through the great events that form her backdrops, and she is unquestionably The Real Thing.

This semi-autobiographical novel has been successfully adapted for TV and screen a number of times, but nothing quite touches the experience of reading it for yourself. Read and enjoy!
Not as good as The Pursuit of Love, but a lot less sad. Obviously it all reads as very dated now, but the dissection of the English upper class is sharp and snarky and completely enjoyable. In the future I'd probably sandwich both books together- neither are big books so putting them back to back would result in a very indulgent read. If you liked I Capture the Castle and Cold Comfort Farm you'll like these two.
E-Books Related to Love in a Cold Climate: