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Lady Molly of Scotland Yard (Literature of Mystery and Detection) ePub download

by Emmuska Orczy Baroness Orczy

  • Author: Emmuska Orczy Baroness Orczy
  • ISBN: 0405078900
  • ISBN13: 978-0405078903
  • ePub: 1504 kb | FB2: 1342 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ayer Co Pub (June 1, 1976)
  • Pages: 305
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 118
  • Format: lit lrf rtf docx
Lady Molly of Scotland Yard (Literature of Mystery and Detection) ePub download

LibriVox recording of Lady Molly of Scotland Yard by Baroness Orczy

LibriVox recording of Lady Molly of Scotland Yard by Baroness Orczy. It was written by Baroness Orczy, who is best known as the creator of The Scarlet Pimpernel, but who also invented two immortal turn-of-the-century detectives in The Old Man in the Corner and Lady Molly of Scotland Yard.

Description: ady Molly of Scotland Yard is a collection of short stories about Molly Robertson-Kirk, an early fictional female detective. First published in 1910, Orczy's female detective was the precursor of the lay sleuth who relies on.

Fiction & Literature. Mystery & Detective. By Orczy, Emmuska Baroness, Orczy, Baroness Emmuska. Baroness, (Emusca/Emmuska/Emma Magdalena Rosalia Marie Josepha Barbara) Orczy, Mrs Barstow (1865-1947) was a British novelist, playwright and artist of Hungarian origin. She was most notable for her series of novels featuring the Scarlet Pimpernel. Some of her paintings were exhibited at the Royal Academy in London.

More books by Baroness Emmuska Orczy. Lady Molly has a woman's viewpoint that the male inspectors did not. Her success rate of mysteries solved, elevated her to a position of respect. We learn in the final two chapters, why she began and ended her career. I. THE NINESCORE MYSTERY o A woman is found dead lying face down in a pond. o The love of a daughter breaks this case. II. THE FREWIN MINIATURES o An old man dies, and shortly after his priceless ivory miniatures are stolen. o The finger of guilt points to a son, but Molly does not think he is guilty.

Lady Molly of Scotland Yard is a collection of short stories about Molly Robertson-Kirk, an early fictional female detective. It was written by Baroness Orczy, who is best known as the creator of The Scarlet Pimpernel, but who also invented two turn-of-the-century detectives in The Old Man in the Corner and Lady Molly of Scotland Yard. First published in 1910, Orczy's female detective was the precursor of the lay sleuth who relies on brains rather than brawn.

I The ninescore mystery.

London: cassell and company, lt. 1912. I The ninescore mystery.

Baroness Emma Magdolna Rozália Mária Jozefa Borbála "Emmuska" Orczy de Orci (/ˈɔːrtsiː/; 23 September 1865 – 12 November 1947) was a Hungarian-born British novelist and playwright.

Baroness Emmuska Orczy (1865-1947) was a British novelist, playwright and artist of Hungarian noble origin. She also wrote popular mystery fiction and many adventure romances. Her Lady Molly of Scotland Yard" was an early example of a female detective as the main character. During the First World War, Baroness Orczy formed the Women of England's Active Service League, an unofficial organization aimed at the recruitment of male volunteers for active service.

Download Baroness Emmuska Orczy's Lady Molly of Scotland Yard for your kindle, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile

Download Baroness Emmuska Orczy's Lady Molly of Scotland Yard for your kindle, tablet, IPAD, PC or mobile. All through her successful career at the Yard she honoured me with her friendship and confidence, but when she took me in partnership, as it were, she made me promise that I would never breathe a word of her private life, and this I swore on my Bible oath-"wish I may die," and all the rest of it. Yes, we always called her "my lady," from the moment that she was put at the head of our section; and the chief called her "Lady Molly" in our presence.

Baroness Emmuska Orczy, Hungarian-born British novelist chiefly . The Literature Network - Biography of Baroness Emmuska Orczy.

Baroness Emmuska Orczy, Hungarian-born British novelist chiefly remembered as author of The Scarlet Pimpernel, one of the greatest popular successes of the 20th century. She also wrote several detective stories, including Lady Molly of Scotland Yard (1910) and Unravelled Knots (1925). This article was most recently revised and updated by Amy Tikkanen, Corrections Manager.

Dodo
Lady Molly is a woman ahead of her time. The first real-life female detectives didn't show up until a decade or so after Baroness Orczy's fictional one. Whether Emmuska Orczy (yes, the author of THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL books) helped pave the way for real policewomen and detectives isn't provable, but I'd like to think her stories did.

Lady Molly is quite the character. She relies on her brains and female intuition and picks up on information and clues that her male counterparts don't notice or don't feel is important. Oh, and let's not forget that she's also young and attractive. Why? Because the narrator of the stories, Molly's assistant, Mary Granard, won't let us. She manages to get in a lot of heroine worship in each story, letting us know how brilliant and beautiful Lady Molly is.

There are 12 mysteries in total for Lady Molly to solve. They are all included here. You can try to solve them along with or before Lady Molly but there's always a wee bit of information not quite divulged to us and that is usually some female intuition of Lady Molly's that I, although female, am not able to intuit. But no matter if you can or cannot solve the mysteries before Lady Molly, they are all still fun period pieces and are as valuable to read for period language, behavior and history as they are for the mysteries themselves.

As the stories progress, you will discover something about Lady Molly and her reason for working at Scotland Yard. I won't spoil it for you but if you are a feminist or empowered-woman fan you may find the way everything ends slightly disappointing. Or not. Molly is still a woman ahead of her time.
Cordanius
I really could have loved this story, if there more about lady Molly in each story. The last two stories explained a lot. It was fine for the last two to be at the end, but I felt the other ten could have has more of Lady Molly. The stories are told from Mary,the companion, point of view, which is fine. I realize they are meant to be like Sherlock Homes where the stories are told by Dr. Watson, but in those you see a lot of Homes. I really find the main characters very interesting and wish there were more about them. It could have been so much better if that would have been done.
Oveley
If you love Sherlock Holmes, you MUST read Lady Molly of Scotland Yard. Like Sherlock, it is written in 1st person from the point of view of the assistant. It's classic literature, so nice to have it on Kindle for those archaic words. These are short novellas, or long short stories....but you can read one in a sitting, then put it away while you read others. I was introduced to the author, Baroness Orczy, in a Dover book of women mystery writers. Fell in love with her writing and this one has all her stories about Lady Molly. Enjoy! :0)
Silver Globol
Bottom Line First: A sequence of short, mysteries each solved by a Sherlock Holmes like lady investigator - Lady Molly of Scotland Yard
Easy to read and entertaining if not particularly engrossing. Pleasant reading for a lunch break or other short time away from the day

The author: Baroness Emmuska Orczy, was born titled and lived an aristocratic life in Hungary until a pheasant revolt sent her family to Paris and ultimately London. She would be educated in Brussels and Paris. She became an artist and illustrator, and socialized with the likes of Franz List and Richard Wagner.

Along the way she would become a much published writer, most famously of the several Scarlett Pimpernel books. She would see a few of her plays go into production and with her husband illustrate and publish books of Hungarian folktales.

This collection of short mysteries is most often compared to her contemporary mystery writer Sir Author Conan Doyle. For example, Sherlock Holmes is narrated by Dr. Watson who can be somewhat oblivious and doglike in his devotion. Lady Molly has a devoted narrator Mary who can be equally oblivious and somewhat cloying.

Doyle's' Sherlock Holmes, has outlived The Baroness' Lady Molly, or at least lived on several larger stages. There are other important differences.
For one the Lady Molly stories are very short, rarely more than a dozen pages. The various mysteries tend to be comparatively simple, usually involving a single question or piece of evidence to be explained. The convention to these stories is that Lady Molly brings to late 19th century London a woman's sensitivities.

Sherlock Holmes advertised his skills as those of the first consulting detective to apply rigorous deductive logic. In deductive logic a person moves from one known fact to another fact. For example Holmes sees someone with a wet hat, shoulders and a dry, rolled umbrella Holmes concludes: someone dropped water on this person. Deductive reasoning can be trivial unless one is very observant in collecting facts not readily appreciated by others and backs it with a huge variety of potentially related facts. For example exact knowledge of tobacco and tobacco blends.

Lady Molly tends to use inductive logic. That is she will use the same kinds of specific observations that Holmes uses, but she is more like to combine these observations into general ideas and build theories. She would look at the wet hat and shoulders, dry umbrella and conclude that if the act was deliberate and if the wet person was not happy about being wet (that is it was not taken as a prank), they must have had an argument, stormed out of their upper story flat and the person left behind tossed down the water in order to get the `Last Word'. Both Holmes and Lady At some point either detective will need to use both kinds of logic. Both might claim that they never guess.

Generally Baroness Orczy's Lady Molly stories will give the reader a fair chance to solve the mystery before the reader. Once you grasp the Baroness' style you may solve some cases immediately. Still it is worth the few minutes to finish a story to see how her Ladyship reaches her solution. Then there will be a new challenge. The Kindle edition is, as of today, a number of fun challenges at under a buck. Take the challenge and enjoy.
Opilar
I enjoyed, first, the shortness of the stories. It’s peasant to be able to find the conclusion without reading hundreds of pages or learning of every crack in the sidewalk. Second, Lady Molly is a very good detective! Third, it was nice to go back to a time when people spoke politely and people knew each other. I’ll read more.
IWantYou
These short narrations hold antique charm along with literary interest as the first stories with a female detective. They work well for bedtime reading or waiting in a doctor's office. Some of them "hold water" better than others, but they kept my interest well enough that I made it to the end of the book. I thought Lady Molly resembled Mary Poppins more than Sherlock Holmes--she's "practically perfect in every way" and works a bit of magic on the side. I grew a little weary of the denigration of the men of Scotland Yard and the fawning mush that the narrator always used in referring to "my dear lady." Clues amounted to superfluous information in some of these renderings which denies the reader the enjoyment of solving the mystery; Lady Molly just somehow knew who was guilty as soon as she heard about the crime. Overall it's a pretty decent collection of magazine stories.
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