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Best Man to Die (Her An Inspector Wexford mystery) ePub download

by Ruth Rendell

  • Author: Ruth Rendell
  • ISBN: 0893403172
  • ISBN13: 978-0893403171
  • ePub: 1562 kb | FB2: 1969 kb
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Audiogo; Large type edition edition (May 1981)
  • Pages: 377
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 981
  • Format: doc lrf docx lit
Best Man to Die (Her An Inspector Wexford mystery) ePub download

Ruth Rendell Ruth Rendell.

SUMMARY: Chief Inspector Wexford is in China, visiting ancient tombs and palaces with a group of British tourists. After their return to England, one of his fellow tourists is found murdered. As he questions other members of the group, Wexford finds secrets of greed, treachery, theft, and adultery, leading the distressed inspector to ask not who is innocent, but who is least guilty.

Ruth Rendell is a great mystery writer. Not up to her usual standards I feel

The best mystery writer anywere in the English-speaking world. For readers who have almost given up mysteries. Ruth Rendell is a great mystery writer. On this occasion, I found her writing difficult to follow. Not up to her usual standards I feel.

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Ruth Rendell The Best Man To Die The fourth book in the Chief Inspector Wexford series, 1969Chapter 1 Jack Pertwee was getting married in the morning and the Kingsmarkham and District Darts Club were in the Dragon to give him what George Carter called a send-off. I don’t like the sound of that, George,’ said Jack. I’m getting married, not buried. ‘It comes to the same thing. The fourth book in the Chief Inspector Wexford series, 1969. Chapter 1. Jack Pertwee was getting married in the morning and the Kingsmarkham and District Darts Club were in the Dragon to give him what George Carter called a send-off.

SKU: 63730 Categories: Books, Ruth Rendell, Scotland Yard Detectives Tag: Ruth Rendell. Suspense is spiced with ironic twists as Chief Inspector Wexford and his assistant join forces with the groom to track down a killer. Rendell may be just the woman to get them started again. Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine. First-rate entertainment.

The book is Another Inspector Wexford mystery, this one from 1970. You read this, with characters who are too materialistic, too made-up (the women) who are wholly narcissistic and who are all about what they own, how much of it and who's looking at it, and you might think, okay, this was written today. Jan 10, 2018 Lauren rated it really liked it. Shelves: mystery.

Now Chief Inspector Wexford and his assistant join forces with the groom to track down a killer. About the Author: Ruth Rendell is the author of Road Rage, The Keys to the Street, Bloodlines, Simisola, and The Crocodile Bird. She is the winner of the Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Award.

Rendell's Inspector Wexford mysteries are all superior. An Inspector Wexford Outing: Two Cases Intersect. Published by Thriftbooks. However, I did have trouble with one crucial aspect of the story and that is with what first appears to be a subplot, but proves to be connected to the primary case in question. I want to avoid a spoiler, but my difficulty deals with the original identification and original supposition concerning one of the fatalities in the secondary plot thread. It just does not quite compute. com User, 12 years ago. Ruth Rendell has twenty Detective Chief Inspector Wexford crime novels in her arsenal, and this was number four in the series.

Who could have suspected that the exciting stag party for the groom would be the prelude to the murder of his close friend Charlie Hatton? And Charlie's death was only the first in a string of puzzling murders involving small-time gangsters, cheating husbands, and loose women. Now Chief Inspector Wexford and his assistant join forces with the groom to track down a killer . . .
NiceOne
Ruth Randell is a great writer. She makes everything she writes come alive with her vivid and perceptive descriptions. This book is no exception, but the story is weak. It's a short story filled out with 150 pages of well-written description and observation that have nothing to do with the story. The plot is interesting, with two seemingly unconnected strands and the usual red herrings. But then it suddenly ends with Inspector Wexford solving the mystery with clairvoyant, Sherlock Holmes-like perception. Randell usually does a lot better.
Dori
"It was as though the clouds were not themselves mere vapour but impermeable sagging sacks, purposely constructed and hung to contain water."

For imagery alone it is worth going back to 1969 when Inspector Wexford's life was simpler. He has time to observe the weather, the night sky, and, in one majestic passage, the fields of grain in all their sunlit glory. Beyond that, you may be disappointed if you are used to contemporary Kingsmarkam. Most obvious are the dated references to contraceptives and troublesome wives and daughters, not to mention the absurdly low value of currency at the time. ("She was an heiress and she had a hundred thousand pounds...") In this and presumably her other early novels now available for the Kindle, Rendell shows how clever she is in constructing her crimes, but her characters are more predictable (in a class-conscious Britain), and the scenes seem almost to have been made for the stage. "The lightning flared into his face and, covering his eyes with one hand, he said desperately..." The biggest surprise to me was that the Inspector was grumpier and fustier back then. He continually spouts from literature, as he is still wont to do, and he enjoys curmudgeonly sparring with the local doctor, but he doesn't yet carry the weight of societal change and family disappointments.

I recommend reading THE BEST MAN TO DIE for social history and also to learn how writers evolve their series characters. I learned something by downloading what seemed like a bargain: On Kindle, the copyright will be the date the story was made into an e-book. The first date of publication was nowhere to be seen. Henceforth, I will check with one of several webs sites to get a chronological list of an author's novels before buying a book. In this case, the lower price is a tip-off.

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GWEZJ
Ruth Rendell is a great mystery writer. On this occasion, I found her writing difficult to follow. Her writing shares the blame with my reading habits which are maybe ten pages a night, but not every night. With a good mystery, one doesn't fall asleep after ten pages or one shouldn't use it as a means to fall asleep as you can lose characters and plot. For the reader who likes to sit down over a day or two and finish a book.
Brajind
Well written with an intriguing plot. I gave up on Rendell after reading a couple of her books in which the characters were so despicable that I could hardly finish them. I was not aware of the Wexford series at the time. I am glad I tried one as the inspector is quite delightful.
kolos
Not a sympathetic detective or other characters. One of the weirder detective novels I have read. I couldn't identify with the detective and found the characters of the book distasteful. Perhaps not a book the average American can identify with. May be better for UK readers.
Vut
Great story, typical Ruth Rendell. Her characters are very believable and the storyline keeps you guessing. However there's a typo on virtually every page, which is very distracting.
generation of new
Glad I've stuck with Inspector Wexford. The series is filling out with this installment. Everyone -- cops and criminals -- are more interesting and I'm getting to feel as if I know Wexford better and better. Plots still seem a bit contrived, with elements that come together in the end, but don't do so in any significant or meaningful way. I mean, it's just a bloke solving crimes, no larger insight into society is gained with the solution of the crime... We'll see if Wexford starts asking the big questions...
Not up to her usual standards I feel. Inspector Wexford is, of course, a plodding but intuitive detective who works until he gets his man. But the author does write novels that you don't put down until you reach the end.
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