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Eat Thy Neighbour: A History of Cannibalism ePub download

by Daniel Diehl

  • Author: Daniel Diehl
  • ISBN: 0750943726
  • ISBN13: 978-0750943727
  • ePub: 1981 kb | FB2: 1354 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Mythology & Folk Tales
  • Publisher: The History Press; 1st edition (August 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 212
  • Format: txt mbr lrf doc
Eat Thy Neighbour: A History of Cannibalism ePub download

Diehl and Donnelly's book, "Eat Thy Neighbour", starts out with a brief history on cannibalism other people and why some people were simply forced by their own inclination to survive, the authors offer a wide variety o. .

Diehl and Donnelly's book, "Eat Thy Neighbour", starts out with a brief history on cannibalism other people and why some people were simply forced by their own inclination to survive, the authors offer a wide variety of reasons why men and women historically (and currently) cross one of the last human taboos. Historical aspects of tribal anthropophagy are mentioned and the book starts out as a kind of anthropological adventure into the past.

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Eat Thy Neighbour - Daniel Diehl. No less an author than William Shakespeare also used cannibalism to intrigue his audiences in Titus Andronicus, and in Daniel Defoe’s eighteenth-century classic Robinson Crusoe, the eponymous hero’s friend, Friday, is introduced when he escapes from a band of fierce cannibals. In the 1960s, sci-fi author Rod Serling gave the subject a modern twist in his short story ‘To Serve Man’, wherein the true purpose behind a seemingly benign alien invasion is revealed when an alien book, whose title also served as the title of the story, proved to be a cookbook.

A history of. Cannibalism. Mark p. donnelly and daniel diehl. Daniel Diehl and Mark P. Donnelly have asserted the moral right to be identified as the authors of this work. First published in 2006 by Sutton Publishing Limited.

This study puts cannibalism into its social and historical perspective.

In Eat Thy Neighbour the authors put the subject of cannibalism into its social . Daniel Diehl,Mark P Donnelly. Management Secrets from History.

In Eat Thy Neighbour the authors put the subject of cannibalism into its social and historical perspective. Biographies Thriller & Crime True Crime. Tales from the Tower of London. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Daniel Diehl, Mark P. Donnelly. All tastes are catered for in this hugely compelling book that is always vivacious but never salacious. Even in an age when almost nothing is sacred, numerous prohibitions surround the subject, and yet a dark fascination with the subject remains. Characters include Sweeny Todd, Jeffrey.

helped their neighbours when they could and sympathised with them when they could not. All that changed for one Wisconsin town and, by extension, for the nation in 1957, when the Ed Gein case broke into the national news. In a very real sense, America, and the way we look at it, has never been the same since.

Cannibalism is unquestionably one of the oldest and deepest-seated taboos. Even in an age when almost nothing is sacred, religious, moral and social prohibitions surround the topic. But even as our minds recoil at the mention of actual acts of cannibalism there is some dark fascination with the subject. Appalling crimes of humans eating other humans are blown into major news stories and gory movies: both Hitchcock's "Psycho" and "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" were based on the crimes of Ed Gein, who is profiled, along with others, in this book. In "Eat Thy Neighbour", the authors put the subject of cannibalism into its social and historical perspective. They present a lively and informative account of cannibalism, and cannibals, from the earliest known incidents to the present day. They include cases of ritual cannibalism in early and primitive societies such the inhabitants of Papua New Guinea; cases where famine, poverty, disease or war has left no alternative; cases in mythology, legend, literature, and fairytales like "Hansel and Gretel"; and cases of individuals from the Middle Ages to the present - Mrs Lovett and Sweeny Todd, Jeffrey Dahmer, and Armin Meiwes, the recent German cannibal who found his victim via the internet.
PanshyR
I like 50% of the book, the parts detailing cannibalism from ancient Rome to Papua New Guinea were fascinating, not to mention the different types of cannibalism, such as circumstantial (you're in Ukraine and Stalin has stolen your grain), to inherit the qualities of a fallen enemy, or because you're a sick criminal.

The stories of Ed Gein and Dahmer were fascinating, and I did learn some new information I didn't know before, such as Dahmer's fear of being alone and his desire to create human zombies that would always love him by drilling into their brains and dropping some kind of acid. Of course, for Dahmer it wasn't just about eating people, he also liked having sex with them. Talk about playing with your food, LOL.

Now some reviewers have complained about the attitude of the writer, but come on people, if you're reading this it's obvious you have a sense of humor. Who else would read a book like this? I'm reading it because sometimes truth is scarrier than faction, and as a fan of splatterpunk horror fiction writers, I needed a break from their fantasies.
Flamekiller
I would have given the book 5 stars if the second half of the book had been more like the first half. I was interested more in the anthropology aspect of cannibalism, and the second half was all about true crime events from the last century (most of which I have already heard about previously and this made it less interesting). Still, it was an interesting but gross read.
JoJosho
Anthopophagy is shocking only if humans are seen as somehow semi-divine. Otherwise, we are just flesh and blood and muscle and sinew, the same as any other animal, and eating each other would seem like a good solution to overpopulation (see Jonathan Swift's satirical piece on the Irish question).

This book has been criticised for being loose with the history: quoting doubtful sources or reporting events that may never have happened. History, particularly of matters that are generally considered criminal (except in the early chapters on tribal rituals) is always subjective - the evidence gathered is often from the victims, in this case long since digested, or the perpetrators, who will often deny the truth or else embellish it for self-aggrandisement. This book therefore sets out to follow the mythology - the number of humans that Ottis Toole and Henry Lee Curtis actually barbecued is not as important as the fact that they did so, and that they claimed their victims tasted like suckling piglets, except for teenage boys who tasted gamier. This is the "meat" of the text - why are these observations more shocking than the myriad cookbooks that tell us how to barbecue suckling piglets? Unless you believe that man is formed in the image of god (whatever that means) then it is only mythology that makes one act despicable and criminal and another the subject of TV reality shows. This book explores the entrails of that mythology with a pleasing lack of squeamishness, and leaves open the question of why we love some animals and eat others.
Iaiastta
Diehl and Donnelly's book, "Eat Thy Neighbour", starts out with a brief history on cannibalism. Tying in the probabilities as to why some people chose to eat...other people and why some people were simply forced by their own inclination to survive, the authors offer a wide variety of reasons why men and women historically (and currently) cross one of the last human taboos.

Historical aspects of tribal anthropophagy are mentioned and the book starts out as a kind of anthropological adventure into the past. The reader is then brought up to the past 200 years and individual chapters on various cannibals are revealed in lurid detail. This is not faint-hearted reading. Unless you can detatch yourself from the victims and have a solid stomach, you may not appreciate some of the reports (some of which are pieced together from personal confessions).

I have read other material on cannibalism in the past, and while I felt this to be more a book that focused on individuals, rather than the general topic of cannibalism, it would still be a good starting point if you are interested in this kind of history and/or subject. I gave it five stars for keeping me turning the pages. If I could, I'd mark it 3 or 4 for the content.
Bludworm
Really gets into the meat of the topic, with examples from pre-history through to the modern day, tracing one of our oldest taboos through many motivations and incarnations.
Zulkishicage
Very interesting and insightful as to how cannibals think. In-depth case studies that give all necessary details and more. Would recommend to a friend.
Uaha
A bit risquè, but a truly interesting read. It has many intriguing facts about cannibalism and thankfully no recipes on how to cook people.
Definitely interesting read, especially if you love true crime and reading about history.
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