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The Little Known ePub download

by Janice Daugharty

  • Author: Janice Daugharty
  • ISBN: 098412585X
  • ISBN13: 978-0984125852
  • ePub: 1427 kb | FB2: 1786 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Literary
  • Publisher: BelleBooks, Inc. (February 1, 2010)
  • Pages: 234
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 524
  • Format: lrf rtf txt azw
The Little Known ePub download

Outside the church it is freezing, raining, but inside Lavonia is doing just fine. Kim and Shelton are desparate to find their missing loved ones

Outside the church it is freezing, raining, but inside Lavonia is doing just fine. She is seated on the first pew in her widow's weeds facing the casket of her x-husband and his common-law wife in the choir. Kim and Shelton are desparate to find their missing loved ones. Then gradually each comes to a secret but mutual understanding of the global mystery of the vanished millions.

About Janice Daugharty: Back on Goodreads and back to writing, and hopefully publishing Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Janice Daugharty's books.

About Janice Daugharty: Back on Goodreads and back to writing, and hopefully publishing. Discover new books on Goodreads.

Set during the turbulent 1960's, The Little Known is a coming-of-age story full of hope and forgiveness.

Remove from Wishlist. Set during the turbulent 1960's, The Little Known is a coming-of-age story full of hope and forgiveness.

All that money-a hundred thousand dollars-could be the ticket to everything he's ever wanted, but he knows he can't spend it, not only because his conscience won't let him, but for fear of being caught. He decides to do what he can for his needy neighbors, both black and white, and begins mailing them hundred dollar bills anonymously, but it irks Knot daily to discover that most of them squander it and don't use the money as he had intended, and that the money doesn't change their lives for the better

The Little Known by Janice Daugharty An excellent and poignant book. Last days of publishers' promo sale. A Righteous Wind, an ebook by Janice Daugharty at SmashwordsFREEBOOK! at most major online book sites. What's going on in the mideast now, according to scripture.

The Little Known by Janice Daugharty An excellent and poignant book. Book Nooks Hair Pictures Kindle Fiction History River Apple Watches Cats. Making History, an ebook by Janice Daugharty at Smashwords. Free Book - Just Doll, by Janice Daugharty, is free in the Kindle store, courtesy of publisher Bell Bridge Books.

Necessary Lies" by Janice Daugharty is another of those books that I. .

Necessary Lies" by Janice Daugharty is another of those books that I read in one sitting. I had to know the outcome of the story regardless of the time and at 160 pages it was doable. Young love has rarely been so scary, or so strangely redemptive, as it is in "Necessary Lies. Everybody must start reading Janice Daugharty right now!

Janice Daugharty, artist in residence at Abraham Baldwin Agriculture College, in Tifton, Georgia, is the author of 7 print novels and two story collections.

Janice Daugharty, artist in residence at Abraham Baldwin Agriculture College, in Tifton, Georgia, is the author of 7 print novels and two story collections. Daugharty is in the process of uploading e-stories to Smashwords for your reading pleasure. For more on this author visit ww. anicedaugharty.

Janice Daugharty is artist in residence at Abraham Baldwin Agriculture College, in Tifton, Georgia. This is Daugharty's tenth published novel.

When twelve-year-old Knot Crews, an African American boy growing up in the segregated south Georgia town of Statenville, discovers a bag of bank-robbed cash in an alley, he is nearly overcome with happiness and terror. All that money-a hundred thousand dollars-could be the ticket to everything he's ever wanted, but he knows he can't spend it, not only because his conscience won't let him, but for fear of being caught. He decides to do what he can for his needy neighbors, both black and white, and begins mailing them hundred dollar bills anonymously, but it irks Knot daily to discover that most of them squander it and don't use the money as he had intended, and that the money doesn't change their lives for the better. It turns out that the weight of Knot's world can't be lifted by cold hard cash alone. Set during the turbulent 1960's, The Little Known is a coming-of-age story full of hope and forgiveness.
Ericaz
A young black boy in a segregated southern town in the 1960s finds a fortune in stolen money. But what can he do with it? A hundred dollar note isn't exactly legal tender for a boy of the wrong color, and a few pence would be much more useful. Still, Knot Crews is resourceful and kind; he comes up with lots of interesting schemes, none of which work out how he's planned, but all of which sound achingly plausible and real. During the course of a year, Knot learns about himself and his family and neighbors and grows up.

Are heroes the people who are seen saving lives, or those who run away after saving lives? Are good people those who are seen going to church, or those who know their sins and keep away? Are family those who you see very day, or those who choose to live with and stand by you? And who cares for whom?

Knot has to learn who he is, who his mother is, and who his family and friends might yet become. There's a preacher visiting the church in town who promises dreams. There's a white girl falling apart. There are black kids who find it easier to stay invisible if they're alone. And there's hope--bought, not with stolen cash, but with brave deeds born of grave need.

I really enjoyed this book, for its human touch, for a very real-seeming boy, for a dark place where the sun keeps shining, and for the atmosphere and scenes that grow with the child till scary forest is just a bunch of trees.

Disclosure: I heard about this book from BelleBooks and got it free in a deal.
Welen
The Little Known by Janice Daugharty is centered around a Georgia town in the 1960's. It basically starts out with a bank robbery gone wrong. The bank robber leaves his loot behind, and it is discovered by a young boy out riding his bike. Without realizing what is in the brown paper bag, Knot heads for home with the unknown treasure.

He is terrified that he might be in trouble, so he keeps the loot a secret from everyone. He decides to anonymously share the money with anyone he thinks could benefit from some extra cash to make their life better. He soon realizes that even those closest to him simply squander the money, instead of making positive changes.

Knot's story is one of extreme poverty and racial tension. He has the physical means to make a difference, but he finds that the burden of the money is more than he can bear. Several times he tried different ways to dispose of the money, but with no success.

A quick and easy read, The Little Known is a real treasure. It demonstrates loud and clear that money does not ultimately buy happiness.
Blueshaper
This was one of the first books I downloaded for free... and oh my what a deal ! This book was so well written it was hard to let it go and get the rest of my daily stuff done, so I could get back to it later. Loved the suspense,the characters and the plot... all those things that make a good rich read. Wish I could write like that ! I will read it again. Come to think of it, I may start to read it again today!
JoldGold
After my reading of this book on my Kindle, I chose it as my book to review next year for my Book Club. It has themes that I believe will be interesting to discuss and was an author that I felt was worth introducing to my group. I purchased a hard cover too- since I find it easier to use when preparing to give a talk on a book. I have also ordered several other of her books on my Kindle in order to describe other topics that she has written.
Phain
That poor little boy,what a way to live.This is the best book I have read in a long time.so well written.
Swiang
"The Little Known," a coming of age novel set in the period just after the assassination of President John Kennedy, was written for the young adult market but there is something here for readers of all ages. On the one hand, the novel's deeply personal portrayal of the harsh nature of race relations of the time is sure to move younger readers who may have only heard about those days in more general terms. On the other, older readers will be reminded that a great deal of progress has been achieved in the last 50 years.

Things are changing very slowly for the black citizens of little Statenville, Georgia. "Knot" Crews does go to school with white kids now, but he seldom, if ever, dares to speak to one of them, and he lives with his hard-drinking mother in the same segregated part of town in which every Statenville black lives. Blacks and whites do not, by choice of both sides, mix in Statenville.

Near the end of the summer, Knot happens upon a bag of cash tossed aside by a bank robber who is trying to escape the policemen closing in on him. When Knot sees the stacks of $100-dollar bills in the sack ($100,000 worth), he carries the money home knowing full well that his conscious will never allow him to spend it - that he will almost certainly be caught if he ever tries to pass one of the hundreds. Little does Knot know, however, that this money will change his life in ways he could never imagine.

Knot is a soft hearted kid despite the fact that his mother spends more money on booze for herself than she spends on food for him. He is often hungry, and he dresses in the castoff clothing of older relatives, but so does pretty much every other kid in his neighborhood so Knot fits right in. He looks forward to Sunday church services because the old church ladies provide him with a community meal there that beats anything else he will eat during the rest of the week. Some of Knot's neighbors, though, are unluckier than others, and he decides to use some of his found money to make their lives a little easier. That is when he begins to anonymously mail single hundred dollar bills to those he believes are hurting most.

Thus begin Knot's valuable, but terribly disappointing, lessons about human nature. Seldom is his money spent for the purpose he gives it. Most of the money he gives away is spent on new television sets, bicycles, toys and liquor rather than on the clothing, food, diapers and home improvements his neighbors so desperately need. Knot is, however, happy to learn that a few hundred dollars can be enough money to give some abused women, white and black alike, the courage to leave their husbands behind for fresh starts with their children someplace else.

"The Little Known" follows Knot and his neighbors for most of a school year during which the little changes he initiates begin to have a big, cumulative impact on the neighborhood. He learns that money is not the most important thing in the world, that it cannot buy happiness or morality, and that the exact opposite is more often the case than not. Knot might never spend a dime of the bank's money on himself but the money still manages to teach him most of life's most important lessons.

Some of the sexual innuendos and implied language in the book are, I think, a little too much for middle school readers, making the book more suitable for high school age readers.
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