Chef ePub download

by Jaspreet Singh

  • Author: Jaspreet Singh
  • ISBN: 1408805189
  • ISBN13: 978-1408805183
  • ePub: 1365 kb | FB2: 1352 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Literary
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC (March 15, 2010)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 246
  • Format: azw rtf txt lrf
Chef ePub download

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Harshal Dress Emporium. Homemade chocolates for sale. Food and drinks company.

Jaspreet Singh's Chef carries the scents of cardamom, ice, and sweat; is written with such a keen sense of rhythm . Jaspreet Singh has the soul of a poet and the pen of a novelist. Chef is an intricate, subtle, and beautiful book.

Jaspreet Singh's Chef carries the scents of cardamom, ice, and sweat; is written with such a keen sense of rhythm that you can hear the book as you read it; and is placed not only between India and Pakistan but intriguingly between delicate cuisines and crude politics. The novel is transporting-an experience that is not easily laid to rest. Mark Kurlansky, author of Cod and Salt. P. K. Page, author of Cosmologies

Kirpal Singh is travelling on the slow train to Kashmir

Author: Jaspreet Singh. Kirpal Singh is travelling on the slow train to Kashmir. As India passes by the window in a stream of tiny lights, glistening fields and huddled, noisy towns, he reflects on his destination, which is also his past: a military camp to which he has not returned for fourteen years. Kirpal, Kip to his friends, is timorous and barely twenty when he arrives for the first time at General Kumar’s camp, nestled in the shadow of the mighty Siachen Glacier that claimed his father’s life.

There was an awkward silence. Her eyes were red. She needed the book more than she needed my food.

Galgacus, 84 AD The cold is eating into the center of my brain. Thomas Bernhard One 1 For a long time now I have stayed away from certain people. I was late getting to the station and almost missed the Express because of the American President. His motorcade was passing the Red Fort, not far from the railway terminal. The President is visiting India to sign the nucl. There was an awkward silence. There are many varieties of Muslims?’ I asked.

Read Chef, by Jaspreet Singh online on Bookmate – Kip Singh watches .

Read Chef, by Jaspreet Singh online on Bookmate – Kip Singh watches India pass by his window on the slow train to Kashmir. Timorous and barely twenty, Kip arrives for the first time at General Kumar's camp and is placed under the supervision of Chef Kishen, a fiery, anarchic mentor who guides him towards the heady spheres of food and women. Though he is Sikh, Kip feels secure in his rightful allegiance to India, the right side of this interminable conflict. But when he comes across a Pakistani 'terrorist' with long, flowing hair, swept up on the banks of the river, everything changes.

Kip, he said, Minister Sahib and I will inspect the troops and you inspect the kitchens on the glacier. In the helicopter it was cramped. In the helicopter it was cramped ight behind Sahib. The Minister and the General talked about matters connected to the security of our country, using code words like Peak 18 or NJ9842. From one white mountain to the next we flew like an eagle and I felt an intense pressure in my balls. My vertigo was growing more and more intense. Sahib, I almost cried out to him. Sahib, I can’t take it. He didn’t hear.

Kirpal Singh is riding the slow train to Kashmir  . Jaspreet Singh's novel Chef is a moving story centered around needless fighting, suffering, and deprivation. Deprivation of more than comfort; the deprivation of love and open expression that comes with violent conflict, in this case, between India and Pakistan. This is Kirpal Singh's story, which he tells us close to the end of his life, so the narrative jumps around in time to good effect.

Jaspreet Singh is a very learned, gifted, and sensitive writer Basharat Peer An elegy to the beauty of Kashmir . Chef, his first novel, about the damaged landscapes of Kashmir, was a 2010 Observer Book of the Year and won the Canadian Georges Bugnet Award for Fiction.

Jaspreet Singh is a very learned, gifted, and sensitive writer Basharat Peer An elegy to the beauty of Kashmir, written with a sinuous elegance Kate Saunders, The Times. Born in India, Jaspreet Singh moved to Canada in 1990. He has also been a finalist for four awards including the Commonwealth Writers' Prize for Best Book.

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Kirpal Singh is travelling on the slow train to Kashmir. As India passes by the window in a stream of tiny lights, glistening fields and huddled, noisy towns, he reflects on his destination, which is also his past: a military camp to which he has not returned for fourteen years Kirpal, Kip to his friends, is timorous and barely twenty when he arrives for the first time at General Kumar's camp, nestled in the shadow of the mighty Siachen Glacier that claimed his father's life. He is placed under the supervision of Chef Kishen, a fiery, anarchic mentor with long earlobes and a caustic tongue, who guides Kip towards the heady spheres of food and women. 'The smell of a woman is a thousand times better than cooking the most sumptuous dinner, kid,' he muses, over an evening beer. Kip is embarrassed - he has never slept with a woman, though a loose-limbed nurse in the local hospital has caught his eye. In Srinagar, Kashmir, a contradictory place of erratic violence, extremes of temperature and high-altitude privilege, Kip learns to prepare indulgent Kashmiri dishes such as Mughlai mutton and slow-cooked Nahari, as well as delicacies from Florence, Madrid, Athens and Tokyo. Months pass and, though he is Sikh, Kip feels secure in his allegiance to India, the right side of this interminable conflict. Then, one muggy day, a Pakistani 'terrorist' with long, flowing hair is swept up on the banks of the river, and changes everything. Mesmeric, mournful and intensely lyrical, "Chef" is a brave and compassionate debut about hope, love and memory, set against the devastatingly beautiful, war-scarred backdrop of occupied Kashmir.
caster
This is the reason we readers read, for books such as this. There seems to be a trend for inward books recently and this falls into that category. There is plot but mostly to hang thoughts and feelings on. Kip, is a Sikh working in Srinagar as an Army Chef attached to a powerful General's house. The world outside their house is at war. Kip is a quiet, contemplative man and the attention he receives is second hand, mostly associated with the heroic deeds of his soldier father. When people meet Kip they seem to not see him. They talk at him about his dad's exploits. Even his name has been modified by the General from Kirpal to Kip. By the way if you're a foody this is only peripherally about cooking and food though the sights, sounds, smells of Indian cuisine are interwoven throughout the book as you follow Kip around the kitchen but more as metaphor or as a description of place and mood. Sometimes the list of dishes or ingredients almost sound like poetry.

Mostly this book is about political issues that plague India, Pakistan and the pivot is Kashmir. Kashmir is where the best and the worst play out. Another theme is unrequited love both on a personal level and the unrequited love for one's country and countrymen. Both these loves almost break Kip and it does break some of the other characters. I don't want to give the impression this is a philosophy book though that's here. Singh shows the human rights offenses with a deft touch. Bombs don't go off in your face; the prose builds up layer upon layer until there's a slow implosion. I kept thinking, "he doesn't mean that, surely not", and then, with dread, "he does mean that". It makes the horror more real but without having to wipe blood off your face. The relationships have a push pull that read frighteningly close to real life. An example of this is the story of a woman, Irem, who is Muslim and living in Pakistan with her husband. She's so desperately unhappy in her marriage she throws herself into the Ganges and winds up on the Hindu side. She's scooped out of the water and taken prisoner for being an illegal alien and a possible terrorist. She's under the general's care which is how Kip meets her and falls in love. He's never sure if his love is returned or not. This is a sad book. And so well written it could break your heart.
ℓo√ﻉ
I could not sleep and at the middle of the night decided to download Chef to my Kindle. Normally this is the best way to bring sleep to me but Chef did not allow me to sleep or I did not allow myself. Without knowing how much time had passed I read 60 pages. I am a very slow reader because if I find a novel to be really good I read very slow, just like I eat my cheese cake very slow to keep the taste in my mouth for a long time.

At first glance the novel seemed to be celebration of good food in spicy India but when I read more I realised that Jaspreet Singh had cooked the culture and history of modern India. "There is no such things as Indian food, but there are methods." In fact there is no such thing as Indian people as well. There are Marathis, Sikhs, kashmiris, Hayderabadis Bengalis and thousand more. Food connects people and food keeps them apart. Mutiny of 1857 had started because of Muslim soldiers given pork fat.

Jaspreet Singh has written a wonderful book seriously funny and seriously, serious.
EXIBUZYW
"Chef" by Jaspreet Singh is a complex, subtle and moving coming-of-age novel set in the present-day Kashmir. It is an exquisite, lyrical, literary treat--an unflinching, honest, and melancholic ode to the vagaries of fate and the unfathomable pain of the human condition. Unfortunately, it is also a book that will appeal to only a very small audience of readers. I was attracted to the book because of its many literary award achievements. But I almost missed reading it because I was put off by some of the fine reviews I read here written by obviously knowledgeable and talented readers.

So, why did I like this novel while other literary-minded readers did not? I am probably better-read than most reviewers on the culture and history of India and Pakistan. I've recently taken college-level courses on these subjects and I'm an avid reader of literary novels written by major Pakistani and Indian authors. Also, I've listened to a number of lectures about the Kashmiri situation. I have a modest understanding of the Sikh religion and how it can influence the thinking, personality, and motivations of its followers. And finally, I take great pleasure in novels that challenge me to sympathize with and understand main characters who are fundamentally different from anyone I've known before.

Kip, the main character in this novel, is not an easy fellow to comprehend. By Western standards, he is a perplexing oddity. He is a man who keenly and passionately observes life, but for the most part, does not engage with it. He is also a man who has a very poor understanding of his own feelings and motivations. Since the story is told entirely from Kip's point of view, this makes the success of any secondary characterization extremely difficult. This is one of the novel's greatest weaknesses and the main reason why I did not give it a higher rating.

The prose is lush, evocative, original, and brilliant. The story seems so genuine that the reader feels like a voyeur.

Don't read this novel if you are looking for a strong compelling story leading to a definite conclusion. This is not that type of novel. This is a book of reminiscences about an ordinary life in an extraordinary, politically significant, and exotic setting. This is a deep, subtle, unflinchingly honest view of life in all its complexity. It is a book about coming to terms with the reality of human imperfection and cruelty. It's about making peace with the dark core of humanity.

My eyes brimmed with tears during some of the passages in this novel--not with sadness, but with acceptance and truth. I was also left with a feeling of hope...that perhaps there is a solution to the Kashmiri situation, and that it is happening right now on a very small scale that, hopefully, will grow exponentially.
Dalarin
Loved the way it was written. Cooking is my love and the author approached his story thru recipes.
I had the audio version and had the full Indian accent to make the story seem in place. Wish it had more of an ending though. Wanted some resolution to his needs.
Jia
Chef provides an excellent journey to Kashmr and permits the reader the possibility to understand the heartbreaking problems existing for it's people because of the neverending disagreements between India and Pakistan! This book about one of the World's last outposts is accompanied by a rich mixture of dishes prepared by an outstanding Chef! Thank you Jaspreet Singh. I enjoyed your book very much and cannot wait for the sequal
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