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Kate Vaiden ePub download

by Reynolds Price

  • Author: Reynolds Price
  • ISBN: 0689117876
  • ISBN13: 978-0689117879
  • ePub: 1824 kb | FB2: 1261 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Literary
  • Publisher: Scribner; 1st edition (June 23, 1986)
  • Pages: 306
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 583
  • Format: lit doc azw rtf
Kate Vaiden ePub download

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. 0ne of the most feisty, spellbinding and engaging heroines in modern fiction captures the essence of her own life in this contemporary American odyssey born of red-clay land and small-town people. We meet Kate at a crucial moment in middle age when she begins to yearn to see the son she abandoned when she was seventeen.

Kate Vaiden (1986) by Reynolds Price is Kate’s first-person narrative of her life-a life riddled . Minor female characters in Kate Vaiden, especially her often stoic yet devoted Aunt Caroline and brash but all-knowing close friend, Noony, are equally unique portraits.

Kate Vaiden (1986) by Reynolds Price is Kate’s first-person narrative of her life-a life riddled with incomparable tragedy. Kate Vaiden is representative of Price’s best work and reflects his many strengths as a writer. The novel is Price at his finest, writing a fictional autobiography. Price’s male characters are less colorful yet still distinctive, and all play significant roles in Kate’s life. In one way or another, they all fall short-not only when it comes to meeting Kate’s needs, but their own.

at least with this book. By the time I’d finished it, it had coalesced into a warm and inviting story

at least with this book. By the time I’d finished it, it had coalesced into a warm and inviting story. One could even believe it was a memoir instead of a work of fiction.

Reynolds Price’s most popular book is Kate Vaiden. Books by Reynolds Price. Showing 30 distinct works. Kate Vaiden by. Reynolds Price.

Familial dysfunction defines this Price effort-his first experiment with a first-person narrator in a full-length novel. But if she decides to seek him, will he understand her?

Reynolds Price was born in Macon, North Carolina in 1933 Kate Vaiden was published in 1986 and won the National Book Critics Circle Award. The Good Priest's Son in 2005 was his fourteenth novel.

Reynolds Price was born in Macon, North Carolina in 1933. Educated at Duke University and, as a Rhodes Scholar, at Merton College, Oxford University  . Kate Vaiden was published in 1986 and won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Among his thirty-seven volumes are further collections of fiction, poetry, plays, essays, and translations. Price was a member of both the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy Reynolds Price was born in Macon, North Carolina in 1933.

EdReynolds Price was born in Macon, North Carolina in 1933. Educated at Duke University and, as a Rhodes Scholar, at Mertoucated at Duke University and, as a Rhodes Scholar, at Merton College, Oxford University, he has taught at Duke since 19n College, Oxford University, he has taught at Duke since 1958 and is now James B. Duke Professor of English.

Documents Similar To Kate Vaiden - A Novel by Reynolds Price. A Long and Happy Life, a Novel by Reynolds Price.

New York: Atheneum, 1986. Octavo, original green cloth, original dust jacket. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle prize as the year's best work of fiction, Kate Vaiden is "a wise and wonderful story told by an artist at the peak of his powers" (Chicago Tribune)

Kate Vaiden - A Novel by Reynolds Price. I love Reynolds Price, all of his books are beautiful reads.

Kate Vaiden - A Novel by Reynolds Price. Kate VaidenPaperback. The Paperback of the Kate Vaiden by Reynolds Price at Barnes & Noble.

Now in her mid-fifties, Kate Vaiden recalls her early life growing up, after the violent death of her parents, an orphan in small towns in North Carolina and Virginia in the 1930s and 1940s
Saintrius
Kate Vaiden is “a real middle-sized white woman” who “has kept on going with strong eyes and teeth for fifty-seven years.” She has told her incredible life story to a few individuals, but after “watching them doubt it,” she has “kept quiet for years.” A dramatic turn of events, however, has Kate telling her life story from beginning to end—for him—for someone she has “found”—who she lost or threw away. Kate Vaiden (1986) by Reynolds Price is Kate’s first-person narrative of her life—a life riddled with incomparable tragedy.

Kate Vaiden is representative of Price’s best work and reflects his many strengths as a writer. The novel is Price at his finest, writing a fictional autobiography. The narrative flows seamlessly as Kate tells her life story. At times containing a stream of consciousness, the story is always very realistic and believable. One feels as though they are in the same room as Kate, listening to her story, in her often remarked upon distinctive voice.

Equally or even more powerful is Price’s ability to bring convincing characters to life, especially female ones. Kate’s narrative voice comes across as that of a simple, down to earth person, but Price brilliantly shows off the complexity of this woman. Raised by an aunt and uncle after the horrifying demise of her parents, Kate’s story moves from one tragic episode to another. Price does not paint her as a hapless victim, however. There is an earthiness to the girl who, at the age of twelve, has her first sexual experience and is often responsible for events which befall her—which she readily acknowledges. At times she is spontaneous, almost acting without any forethought. At other times she is deeply contemplative, weighing her options. She is a keen observer of the character of others while at times often allowing herself to fall prey to disingenuous people, almost always men, and paying significant consequences. At times Kate falters, but she always bounces back and is resolute. Intelligent and courageous, regardless of the fate she is handed (or creates for herself), Kate is a woman of tremendous strength and stamina and individuality. Price’s love for his creation shines through page after page of Kate Vaiden which is not surprising since in a 1986 interview with Jefferson Humphries Price stated that he “wanted to write an emotional autobiography” of his mother. “The actual story that Kate tells in over three hundred pages is by no means the story of the actual events of my mother’s life, but it still seems emotionally true to the interior voice of my mother, as I remember it anyway.”

Minor female characters in Kate Vaiden, especially her often stoic yet devoted Aunt Caroline and brash but all-knowing close friend, Noony, are equally unique portraits.

Price’s male characters are less colorful yet still distinctive, and all play significant roles in Kate’s life. In one way or another, they all fall short—not only when it comes to meeting Kate’s needs, but their own. Only one of the male characters in Kate Vaiden truly comes close to being given the focus and detail given to Kate, Walter Porter, a cousin. Walter goes out of his way to try to help Kate and although Price never specifically states the fact, it is obvious Walter is gay and both he and another man later in the story fall in love with a straight man who manipulates them to get what he wants and also takes advantage of Kate with devastating and life-altering aftereffects.

In spite of the parade of catastrophic events that frequently occupy the space of Kate Vaiden’s life, Price’s story never is maudlin and his portrait of his protagonist remains unsentimental and objective. The book is riddled with literary references, exact details from everyday life, exceptional dialogue, frank although non-explicit sexuality, and the pre-and-post World War II era picture of North Carolina and Virginia that hangs over the characters’ lives like a black cloud is subtle and adeptly utilized. Kate Vaiden is a remarkable artistic achievement. Kate, like Rosacoke Mustian who makes her first appearance in an early short story, “A Chain of Love” (1958) and Price’s first novel, A Long and Happy Life (1962) as well as two other novels [A Generous Man (1966) and Good Hearts (1988)], joins the pantheon of memorable and vivid female characters of fiction; the book itself an amazing read.
Quynaus
According to the cover of my edition of KATE VAIDEN, it won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction in 1986. "The New York Times" obituary for Reynolds Price (he died last January) said the same thing. The website for the National Book Critics Circle, however, lists KATE VAIDEN as a finalist for 1986 and "A Summons to Memphis" by Peter Taylor as the winner. What's the explanation? Second-guessing at the National Book Critics Circle? Sloppiness?

From my perspective, KATE VAIDEN is a strong novel, well worth reading, but I don't quite see it as an award-winner. What most stands out is Kate Vaiden, who is a strong woman. (Midway through it, her worldly wise older cousin remarks, "Few people on earth are as strong as Kate Vaiden.") Kate is the voice of the novel, as it is written in the first person, telling the story of her rocky road from the time her parents were killed when she was eleven (in 1938) to the present (1984), as she battles cancer at age fifty-seven. Kate's voice is a very distinctive voice. But is it an authentic voice? That is one of the lightning-rod questions about the novel. Several female Amazon reviewers proclaim that Price's effort to write the novel from the perspective of a woman and with a woman's voice was a fraud and a failure. Yet many critics (mostly men) praised the novel for its woman's voice and perspective. As for me (a male), I believe that Kate's female PERSPECTIVE is true enough - though one thing she does in the novel (mentioned two paragraphs down) goes against the maternal instincts of most - but I don't quite find her VOICE authentic, albeit for reasons having nothing to do with male versus female. Rather, to me, the novel's voice is a little too contrived and folksy, especially the frequent down-home but off-the-wall similes ("I was wild as a bear in a chickenwire cage at a crossroads junkyard, smelling the woods").

The second striking thing about KATE VAIDEN is that it is a novel about orphans. Kate was suddenly orphaned at age eleven. On a number of occasions after that, she abruptly picks up and leaves homes and relationships. The psychological construct seems to be: I am going to leave them before they can leave me. Kate is much like Moll Flanders, the original eponymous orphaned female first-person narrator. Indeed, the woman who ran the bookmobile proffered the sixteen-year-old Kate a book - "Moll Flanders". Kate took it, but left it unread by her bed when she bolted from the home that had been hers after her parents' deaths. "Not till twenty years later did I find another copy, and by then it was too late to ask Miss Mabel if she'd offered me consolation or a warning."

At age seventeen Kate has a baby, who was fathered by another orphan, Douglas Lee. In the year or so of their tumultuous relationship, Kate and Douglas seem to vie with one another over who can commit the most sudden and dramatic disappearing act on the other. And then Kate does the unthinkable, the act that is so contrary to maternal instincts that many women would naturally want to disavow Kate as an authentic female: she abandons her baby boy. Yet, as a recent lurid episode in Florida reminded us, physical and/or psychological abandonment of a child sadly is not beyond reality. Kate Vaiden has immeasurably more substance than Casey Anthony, and thus the question harries us like an ingrown toenail: How could she?

KATE VAIDEN reads quite easily. It is, foremost, a story, and that story is told with good pace. The novel is set in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, near the Virginia border. Much of it occurs in and around Macon, North Carolina (Price's hometown). The region is wonderfully and lovingly portrayed. "[Macon] was tiny--not two hundred people, more than half of them black. No entertainment but summer revivals at the two white churches, Methodist and Baptist; and once or twice a year, a fishfry or Brunswick stew. Otherwise, you talked to the people you lived with and let them talk. Food and family were the only two legal subjects for the women. Men could talk about cotton, tobacco, Negroes, sex, Roosevelt, and money."

Both Kate Vaidens - novel and protagonist - will inhabit your memory, just as "A Long and Happy Life" (the other Reynolds Price novel I have read) and Rosacoke Mustian (its distinctive female protagonist) have with me.
Tygrafym
One of the best books I've read in years. Inspired character study of a tormented woman that made me cry.
WOGY
Loved the book, could not wait to read what Kate would do next
Gholbimand
AN ABSOLUTELY EXCELLENT NOVEL DELIVERED IN PERFECT CONDITION!

THE STORY LINE IS FRESH AND EXCITING; THE PLOT, HUMAN AND I COULD DEFINITELY RELATE...
Vit
Every thing was fine
Morlunn
One of the best late 20th century American novels I've read. It stayed with me for weeks.
This is normally a book I would not have been interested in in the past, preferring historical fiction usually well before the two great wars. But the story line was intriguing and that it had won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Award winners can usually be depended on to be good.

The main character, the girl in the title, is a complicated one, and by the end of the book I found it even harder still to understand her. But that was the mystery of Kate Vaiden. As the years pass, and one bad event after another transpires, Kate's choices lead you further off the path than what you were expecting, making each scene, each town, household or new year, an intriguing situation. You feel for Kate, but also shake your head, wishing she would be a better person, niece, friend and mother. In the end, do you feel bad for her? For me it's hard to say. But her character will be hard to get out of my mind.
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