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The Yearling ePub download

by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings

  • Author: Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
  • ISBN: 0606001093
  • ISBN13: 978-0606001090
  • ePub: 1965 kb | FB2: 1364 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Literary
  • Publisher: Demco Media (February 1, 1988)
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 972
  • Format: mobi docx doc rtf
The Yearling ePub download

Rawlings, Marjorie Kinnan, 1896-1953. Summary: A young boy living in the Florida

Rawlings, Marjorie Kinnan, 1896-1953. Summary: A young boy living in the Florida. backwoods is forced to decide the fate of a fawn.

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (August 8, 1896 – December 14, 1953) was an American author who lived in rural Florida and wrote novels with rural themes and settings. Her best known work, The Yearling, about a boy who adopts an orphaned fawn, won a Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1939 and was later made into a movie of the same name. The book was written long before the concept of young adult fiction, but is now commonly included in teen-reading lists.

The Yearling is a novel by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings published in March 1938. It was the main selection of the Book of the Month Club in April 1938. It was the best-selling novel in America in 1938 and the seventh-best in 1939

The Yearling is a novel by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings published in March 1938. It was the best-selling novel in America in 1938 and the seventh-best in 1939. It sold over 250,000 copies in 1938. It won the 1939 Pulitzer Prize for the Novel.

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings has written a book about the people she lived among and loved, the values they held .

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings has written a book about the people she lived among and loved, the values they held dear, and the Florida scrub country that she described so beautifully. The dialect in the book is so real it reads like poetry. I found myself reading parts of it aloud just to hear it spoken. There are many wonderful characters apart from the The Yearling is Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings’ Pulitzer prize winning novel about the coming of age of Jody Baxter, the son of a backwood farming family that is trying to eke a living from a bit of high land in the Florida scrub shortly after the Civil War.

by. Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. author: Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings d. ate. origpath: 794 d. dentifier. copyno: 1 d. scannerno: 20003265 d. escription.

Much wear to the book, previous owner's inscription to front endpaper, page edges spotted, with wear to tips, corners and edges of jacket, chipping at spine, creases, short closed tears, soiled, price-clipped.

Ships from and sold by Jupiter Gravitation. Much wear to the book, previous owner's inscription to front endpaper, page edges spotted, with wear to tips, corners and edges of jacket, chipping at spine, creases, short closed tears, soiled, price-clipped.

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. No novel better epitomizes the love between a child and a pet than The Yearling. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Young Jody adopts an orphaned fawn he calls Flag and makes it a part of his family and his best friend. But life in the Florida backwoods is harsh, and so, as his family fights off wolves, bears, and even alligators, and faces failure in their tenuous subsistence farming, Jody must finally part with his dear animal friend. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, American short-story writer and novelist who founded a regional literature of backwoods .

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, American short-story writer and novelist who founded a regional literature of backwoods Florida. Marjorie Kinnan’s father, who worked for the . Patent Office, died when she was age 17, and she moved with her mother to Madison, Wis. One of her childhood stories had been. The Yearling, the bittersweet story of a backwater boy who adopts a fawn, was made into a motion picture (1946) and over subsequent years gradually assumed the status of a classic. Many of Rawlings’s stories were collected in When the Whippoorwill (1940).

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1953 Born . Rawlings' home at Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park in Cross Creek, Florida.

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1953 Born August 8, 1896(1896 08 08) Washington, . With money she made from The Yearling, Rawlings bought a beach cottage at Crescent Beach, ten miles south of St. Augustine. In 1941 Rawlings married Ocala hotelier Norton Baskin (1901–1997), and he remodeled an old mansion into the Castle Warden Hotel in St. Augustine (currently the Ripley's Believe it or Not Museum).

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings was born in 1896 in Washington, D. However, in 1938 she won international recognition with her book The Yearling.

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings was born in 1896 in Washington, DC. She always loved writing and in her youth won a prize for a story she submitted to the Washington Post. Her father, Arthur Frank Kinnan worked in the . Patent office as an attorney. With money she made from The Yearling, Rawlings bought a beach cottage at Crescent Beach, Florida, ten miles south of St. Augustine, Florida. Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings had no children of her own; her land at Cross Creek is now the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park. Norton Baskin survived her by 44 years, passing away in 1997.

A young boy living in the Florida backwoods is forced to decide the fate of a fawn he has lovingly raised as a pet
Meri
As a young boy growing up in Florida, I was quite aware of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings classic novel, lovingly written while she was residing at a tiny community in east central Florida, now just a few miles from where I write this, called "Cross Creek" which was the title of a second book she authored, and then her book of annotated "old Florida" recipes called, "Cross Creek Cookery." The epic film made of "The Yearling" premiered at the Florida Theater in Sarasota, near Myakka Park where many of the scenes were filmed, with actors including Gregory Peck starring in the role of young Jody's stern, pioneer father. It has remained one of my favorite books, and I purchased this copy to include the original illustrations. I purchased the book as a gift to the young daughter of an acquaintance, who embodies the spirit of Jody, who originated in the author's mind as a young girl, the gender changed at the suggestion of the publishers who saw more acceptance by the reading public if it were so. The book remains an American classic, and should be on any serious student's reading list. Cross Creek is still there, not much changed from the river side community deep in the pine and oak woods, but now only minutes from Florida Route 301, an area I chose for my retirement, not much changed from the very early years of pioneer Florida, the background for the book. The author lovingly describes every detail of the lush surroundings, the bird and animal life, the magnificent trees and flowers, the pioneer life. The house where the author stayed for a year while writing it, is still there, and is now part of a State Park, dedicated to her memory, at Cross Creek.
Nuadora
If I were rating this book for the quality of the writing, it would be a hands-down five-star rating, but as a word-by-word measure of the pleasure I got out of reading the book, I have to give it four stars. There are so many compelling elements in this book that make it absolutely worth reading. The author's in-depth knowledge of life as it was in this neck of the woods at the time the story took place is phenomenal, along with her ability to convey it in great detail. It is the attention to detail when it comes to the descriptions of the natural environment that--while impressive and way beyond what I'd be able to do with environments with which I'm most familiar--almost led me to dismiss the book early on, led me to occasionally skim passages (which I would never do in a five-star book), and ultimately led to me to remove one star from my rating.

That being said, what kept me enthusiastic about reading the book was above all her ability to convey a sense of wonder in a growing boy, to keep the plot moving enough to make me curious about what would happen next, to tell an amazing story while bringing fascinating characters to life, and to vividly convey a very entertaining dialect. I'd love to be able to hang out for an evening and down some moonshine with these folks just to hear them talk. What continued to blow my mind was the fact that this book focused so deeply on a male perspective while being written by a woman--so much so that if this were written by a man it would now probably be censured for being misogynistic. Most of the women in this book come off as nagging, disreputable, or troublesome, and they are always secondary to the men; however, they are all brilliantly portrayed and believable.

I am personally glad that I encountered this book in my late-thirties. It seems like it used to be a staple for younger readers, but there's no way they'd appreciate so much of what is contained in these pages.
Fast Lovebird
Just about everybody knows the story, has seen the movie. I bought the book on a whim (I'm 67 yrs old), and what a great surprise! I'm a pretty voracious reader, but I guess I do tend toward the older stuff than discovering new talent...I can't stand bad grammar, spoken or written, and it is ubiquitous, much so more these days than the "olden" days.
The book was written in 1938, by someone who loved where she lived, and about a subject she was well versed in, and her writing dislpays this love and knowledge throughout. The writing itslef shows how well she kmew her craft.
I think anyone would enjoy this book; a good story well told. Def recommend !
invasion
My favorite read from childhood. I am once again re-reading it before going to sleep. Puts me in a very peaceful state. Terrific story, full of richly rendered characters and descriptive writing that evokes strong visualizations and emotionally evocative enough so those mental images stay forever. The illustrations are the same as the originals, and on glossy paper. This is a book to buy for any early teen age boy in particular. Buy extra copies and give them to the school library.
YSOP
We saw the movie version with Gregory Peck a couple of weeks ago, and I decided to Kindle a copy of the novel. I'm glad I did, especially this version, which featured N.C. Wyeth's lovely illustrations. The volume I had as a child also had these pictures; I loved them then, and enjoyed them now. Nineteen years ago, we moved to Florida, and the description of the Everglades at the end of the 19th century, with its abundant flora and fauna, meant more to me now than it did then. While this may have been intended to be a children's book when Rawlings wrote it, I enjoyed it just as much this time because the characterizations were so vivid, especially that of Penny, the father. I wouldn't have appreciated him as much at the age of 8 as I do now, and I wouldn't have responded to Ory, the mother either. Their son, Jody, grows up before your eyes, and takes on the responsibilities of a frontier teen. This is a wonderful book, and worthy of a second look.
Uafrmaine
I love the book, even thought this edition is boring (no illustrations for the kids, paper quality so-so). Storywise- it's bittersweet and very emotional, if your kids read it you should too so you can discuss concepts of poverty and loss with them.
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