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Stolen Words ePub download

by Thomas Mallon

  • Author: Thomas Mallon
  • ISBN: 0140144404
  • ISBN13: 978-0140144406
  • ePub: 1122 kb | FB2: 1426 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (February 1, 1991)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 251
  • Format: mobi txt doc azw
Stolen Words ePub download

Thomas Mallon is the author of five novels and five works of nonfiction. To sum up then, Stolen Words is somewhat dated at this point, possibly still worth the read, but likely not to make a connection with the younger generation of readers in particular

Thomas Mallon is the author of five novels and five works of nonfiction. To sum up then, Stolen Words is somewhat dated at this point, possibly still worth the read, but likely not to make a connection with the younger generation of readers in particular. Academically stimulating and more useful for historical cases than current happenings with the plagiarism phenomenon. Dr. Herbert Ulysses Quickwit.

No matter what they steal, they fall back on the same excuses, as Thomas Mallon shows in his wonderful plagiarism book Stolen Words. Before the computer age, they blamed their confusing "notebooks," where they allegedly mixed up their own notes with passages recorded elsewhere. These days, plagiarists claim they mistake electronic files of notes with their own writing.

Thomas Mallon’s STOLEN WORDS: FORAYS INTO THE ORIGINS AND RAVAGES OF PLAGIARISM is thus most welcome

Thomas Mallon’s STOLEN WORDS: FORAYS INTO THE ORIGINS AND RAVAGES OF PLAGIARISM is thus most welcome. Mallon begins with a historical overview, briefly tracing the development of the modern notion of literary property, which was firmly established by the end of the eighteenth century. He rightly gives special attention to the massive plagiarisms of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, documented in Norman Fruman’s COLERIDGE: THE DAMAGED ARCHANGEL

Thomas Mallon's writing style is characterized by charm, wit, and a meticulous attention to detail and character development. Soon after its publication, in 1989, Mallon released a second nonfiction book called Stolen Words: Forays Into the Origins and Ravages of Plagiarism

Thomas Mallon's writing style is characterized by charm, wit, and a meticulous attention to detail and character development. His nonfiction often explores "fringe" genres-diaries, letters, plagiarism-just as his fiction frequently tells the stories of characters "on the fringes of big events. Soon after its publication, in 1989, Mallon released a second nonfiction book called Stolen Words: Forays Into the Origins and Ravages of Plagiarism. Henry and Clara, published in 1994, established Mallon as a writer of historical fiction from that point forward.

Thomas Mallon discusses "Finale: A Novel of the Reagan Years" at the . He has also written the nonfiction books "Stolen Words," about plagiarism; "Mrs.

Thomas Mallon discusses "Finale: A Novel of the Reagan Years" at the 2015 Library of Congress National Book Festival in Washington, .  . Speaker Biography: Writer and teacher Thomas Mallon is the author of several novels, including "Henry and Clara," "Bandbox," "Fellow Travelers," "Watergate" and his latest book, "Finale: A Novel of the Reagan Years. Paine's Garage," about the Kennedy assassination; "A Book of One's Own," about diaries; "Yours Ever," about letters; as well as two volumes of essays, "Rockets and Rodeos" and "In Fact.

Thomas Mallon has masterfully appropriated a jubilant legend (and famous headline) of modern American history - Harry Truman's upset victory over Thomas E. Dewey in the 1948 presidential election - and built around it a midwestern Midsummer Night's Dream. Set in Dewey's hometown of Owosso, Michigan, this is the captivating story of a local love triangle that mirrors the national election contest.

Thomas Mallon's ten books of fiction include Henry and Clara, Fellow Travelers, Watergate (a Finalist for .

Thomas Mallon's ten books of fiction include Henry and Clara, Fellow Travelers, Watergate (a Finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award), Finale and the just-published Landfall. He has also written volumes of nonfiction about plagiarism (Stolen Words), diaries (A Book of One's Own), letters (Yours Ever) and the Kennedy assassination (Mrs. Paine's Garage), as well as two books of essays (Rockets and Rodeos and In Fact).

The definitive book on the subject of plagiarism (The New York Times) is updated with a new afterword about the Internet.

The definitive book on the subject" of plagiarism (The New York Times) is updated with a new afterword about the Internet. What is plagiarism, and why is it such a big deal? Since when is originality considered an indispensable attribute of authorship? Stolen Words is a deft and well-informed history of the sin every writer fears from every angle.

Stolen Words Forays Into the Origins and Ravages of Plagiarism By Thomas Mallon 300 pages. Ticknor & Fields.

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Mustard Forgotten
Tom Mallon is always a pleasure to read and one always learns a lot. The advent of the Internet means this book is somewhat dated, despite its brief chapter on cyberplafiarism, but the discussions are helpful (and entertaining and often chilling) nonetheless.
Pad
read this book and you'll see how A Jacobsen ripped off
Secret Agemda1
Beazekelv
A good book!
Rolorel
Seeing that this book had not yet garnered any reviews, I thought I would put in a word for Mallon's engrossing and fast-paced study of what is (to my mind anyway) a fascinating topic. In light of recent revelations about the work of Kearns Goodwin and Ambrose, it makes for a timely and lively read. In his opening thumbnail sketch of the history of plagiarism, Mallon shows how major literary figures such as Laurence Sterne, Coleridge and de Quincey infused their works with ample unattributed borrowings. (Sterne, for instance, stole heavily from Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy -- even going so far as to plagiarize a passage about plagiarism -- and plagiarized his own love letters to his wife in letters he sent to his mistress years later.) The real gems here, though, are Mallon's discussion of modern scandals. Mallon writes about the novel "Wild Oats" by Jacob Epstein, a late '70s lit wonder boy with all the connections, who fell from grace when his plagiarisms of Martin Amis's "Rachel Papers" were revealed. (Reading Epstein's novel, the passages stolen from Amis seem to Mallon like "plateaus on otherwise flat land," roughly.) And in the cleverly titled chapter "Quiet Goes the Don," about former Texas Tech history professor Jamie Sokolow, Mallon shows how reluctant the academic establishment, down to the AAUP and American Historical Association, was to take action against an obvious and known plagiarist. (Sokolow, after he was coaxed out of Texas Tech, ended up evaluating historical research for the NEH in Washington.)
This book fascinatingly plumbs the psychology of the plagiarist, for example his seeming desire to get caught. (Epstein's novel features students who buy essays from term-paper companies, and a child who is punished for plagiarizing Winnie the Pooh.) An afterword on the internet is interesting but too brief, and the postmodernist challenge to authorship is dealt with too lightly and dismissively for my tastes; however, I would heartily recommend this book to anyone interested in the subject. For further reading, I would suggest a memoir by Neal Bowers, a victim of plagiarism, called "Words for the Taking." Also Anne Fadiman's essay in Ex Libris (from which I have "stolen" my title, heh heh). Of course, she had her own sources.
Fenius
Billed as "The Classic Book On Plagiarism" in the subtitle of this work, Thomas Mallon's Stolen Words is somewhat outdated by now in the first decade of the new Millennium.

That's not to say the discussion of some older cases of plagiarism isn't interesting. Mallon's skill with words is quite evident in his discussion of these older cases such as the Epstein affair, the Falcon Crest hubbub, and other instances of plagiarism from the 1980s. To be fair there is a new "Afterword" on plagiarism in the most recent reprints.

But what about some of the most recent cases of plagiarism to break such as the Jayson Blair farce at the New York Times? The Jack Kelley flap at the USA Today? The Internet plagiarism and cheatsite/term-paper mill industry which has burgeoned since the early 1990s and on into the 2000s? These are missing from what is otherwise an excellent treatise on plagiarism, including a psychological analysis of the phenomenon.

To sum up then, Stolen Words is somewhat dated at this point, possibly still worth the read, but likely not to make a connection with the younger generation of readers in particular. Academically stimulating and more useful for historical cases than current happenings with the plagiarism phenomenon.

Dr. Herbert Ulysses Quickwit
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