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The Secret Vice: Masturbation in Victorian Fiction and Medical Culture ePub download

by Diane Mason

  • Author: Diane Mason
  • ISBN: 0719077141
  • ISBN13: 978-0719077142
  • ePub: 1333 kb | FB2: 1705 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press (October 15, 2008)
  • Pages: 192
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 641
  • Format: mbr txt mbr mobi
The Secret Vice: Masturbation in Victorian Fiction and Medical Culture ePub download

The Secret Vice book.

The Secret Vice book. The book examines the discourse on masturbation in medical works by English, Continental and American practitioners and demonstrates the influence and impact of these writings, not only on Victorian pornography but The secret vice: Masturbation in Victorian fiction and medical culture provides a unique consideration of writings on self-abuse in the long nineteenth century.

oceedings{Mason2008TheSV, title {The Secret Vice: Masturbation in Victorian Fiction and Medical Culture}, author {Diane E. Mason}, year {2008} }. Diane E. Mason. This dissertation considers the representation of masturbation in medical and fictional texts between the mid-Nineteenth Century and the first decade of the Twentieth. Discussion of masturbation in this period has been dominated by the writings of medical historians such as Paula Bennett and Vernon A. Rosario II, and Jean Stengers and Anne van Neck, who make but passing reference to the wider cultural manifestations of the practice.

Published by: Manchester University Press. The book examines the discourse on masturbation in medical works by English, Continental and American practitioners and demonstrates the influence and impact of these writings, not only on Victorian pornography but also in the creation of fictional characters by canonical authors such as Bram Stoker, J. S. Le Fanu, Charles Dickens and Oscar Wilde.

In medical treatises and pedagogical manuals for parents, masturbation became a ‘total illness’: a. .Diary writing functioned as a medium to register and control this secret vice

In medical treatises and pedagogical manuals for parents, masturbation became a ‘total illness’: a life-threatening activity that would lead to near-certain (and gruesome) death. Diary writing functioned as a medium to register and control this secret vice. But the diaries also show ways to change or resist this dominant discourse. The symbols for masturbation reflect some crucial aspects of diary writing: the diary as a memory device, between private experience and public discourses.

Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it. ― Rumi. Being Mortal: Illness, Medicine and What Matters in the End. 333 Pages·2012·1. 17 MB·45,254 Downloads. Atul Gawande Being Mortal Illness, Medicine and(zlibraryexau2g3p onion).

The secret vice: Masturbation in Victorian fiction and medical culture provides a unique consideration of writings on self-abuse in the long nineteenth century

The secret vice: Masturbation in Victorian fiction and medical culture provides a unique consideration of writings on self-abuse in the long nineteenth century.

The book examines the discourse on masturbation in medical works by English, Continental and American practitioners and demonstrates the influence and impact of these writings, not only on Victorian pornography but also in the creation of fictional characters by canonical authors such as Bram Stoker, J. The book also features the first detailed and balanced study of the largely overlooked literature on masturbation as it pertains to women in clinical and popular medical works aimed at the female reader.

This book examines the discourse on masturbation in medical works by influential English, Continental and American practitioners such as J H Kellogg, E B Foote, Havelock Ellis, Krafft-Ebing and R V Pierce.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. The Secret Vice: Masturbation in Victorian Fiction and Medical Culture. This book examines the discourse on masturbation in medical works by influential English, Continental and American practitioners such as J H Kellogg, E B Foote, Havelock Ellis, Krafft-Ebing and R V Pierce.

The secret vice: Masturbation in Victorian fiction and medical culture. An unmanly vice: Self-pollution, anxiety, and the body in the eighteenth century. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Paasonen, . Nikunen, . & Saarenmaa, L. (Ed. Pornification: Sex and sexuality in media culture. Rosario, V. I. (1995). Phantastical pollutions: The public threat of private vice in France. Social History of Medicine, 13(1), 1–21. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

The Secret Vice: Masturbation in Victorian Fiction and Medical Culture provides a unique consideration of writings on self-abuse in the long nineteenth century.The book examines the discourse on masturbation in medical works by English, Continental and American practitioners and demonstrates the influence and impact of these writings, not only on Victorian pornography but also in the creation of fictional characters by canonical authors such as Bram Stoker, J. S. Le Fanu, Charles Dickens and Oscar Wilde.

The book also features the first detailed and balanced study of the largely overlooked literature on masturbation as it pertains to women in clinical and popular medical works aimed at the female reader. Mason concludes with a consideration of the way the distinctly Victorian discourse on masturbation has persisted into the late-twentieth and twenty-first centuries with particular reference to Willy Russell’s tragic-comic novel, The Wrong Boy (2000) and to the construction of ‘Victorian Dad,’ a character featured in the adult comic, Viz.

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