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The Economy of Character: Novels, Market Culture, and the Business of Inner Meaning ePub download

by Deidre Shauna Lynch

  • Author: Deidre Shauna Lynch
  • ISBN: 0226498204
  • ISBN13: 978-0226498201
  • ePub: 1711 kb | FB2: 1137 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (May 13, 1998)
  • Pages: 332
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 221
  • Format: lrf doc lrf lrf
The Economy of Character: Novels, Market Culture, and the Business of Inner Meaning ePub download

The Economy of Character book. Although the story of this shift is usually told in terms of the "rise of the individual," Deidre Shauna Lynch proposes an ingenious alternative interpretation

The Economy of Character book. Although the story of this shift is usually told in terms of the "rise of the individual," Deidre Shauna Lynch proposes an ingenious alternative interpretation.

Lynch shows how character and interiority work (250) as both product and process of culture and literature

Lynch shows how character and interiority work (250) as both product and process of culture and literature. etical Approach Published in 1998, Lynch’s Economy of Character debuted in the post-structuralist (new historicist) heyday and departs from the structuralist theory of the 1950s.

1: The Economies of Characteristic Writing 1: Fleshing Out Characters 2: Fictions of Social Circulation, 1742-1782 Pt.

In a culture of mass consumption, argues Lynch, possessing a belief in the inexpressible interior life of a character rendered one’s property truly private. 1: The Economies of Characteristic Writing 1: Fleshing Out Characters 2: Fictions of Social Circulation, 1742-1782 Pt.

About the author (1998). Deidre Shauna Lynch is assistant professor of English at the State University of New York, Buffalo. Bibliographic information.

In a culture of mass consumption, argues Lynch, possessing a belief in the inexpressible interior life of a character rendered one's property truly private. About the author (1998).

The people inside novels are central to our sense of what novels are and do, and yet characters have been regarded as a problem for fiction. To address the mixed feelings character engenders, this chapter considers its ontological hybridity and through that consideration aims to model an alternative to critical approaches that either reduce characters to textual effects or read characters mimetically as persons

by Deidre Shauna Lynch. At the start of the eighteenth century, talk of literary "characters" referred as much to letters and typefaces as it did to persons in books.

by Deidre Shauna Lynch. Yet by the nineteenth century, characters had become the equals of their readers, friends with whom readers might spend time and empathize. University of Chicago Press.

In The Economy of Character Deidre Lynch does for the evolution of the novel what Michael Denning did more than a. .

In The Economy of Character Deidre Lynch does for the evolution of the novel what Michael Denning did more than a decade ago for nineteenth-century 'cheap fiction': she shows how the interpretive grids readers constructed around fictional characters helped them negotiate the subtleties of a shifting economy and the changing expectations and demographics of readership.

At the start of the 18th century, literary "characters" referred as much to letters and typefaces as it did to persons in books. However, this text shows how, by the 19th century, characters in books became identified with the reader, as friends with whom they empathized. The story of this shift in meaning is usually told in terms of the "rise of the individual", but this text proposes an alternative solution.

Published: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1998. Subjects: English fiction 18th century History and criticism. English fiction 19th century History and criticism. Psychological fiction, English History and criticism. Characters and characteristics in literature. Authors and readers Great Britain History.

At the start of the eighteenth century, talk of literary "characters" referred as much to letters and typefaces as it did to persons in books. Yet by the nineteenth century, characters had become the equals of their readers, friends with whom readers might spend time and empathize.Although the story of this shift is usually told in terms of the "rise of the individual," Deidre Shauna Lynch proposes an ingenious alternative interpretation. Elaborating a "pragmatics of character," Lynch shows how readers used transactions with characters to accommodate themselves to newly commercialized social relations. Searching for the inner meanings of characters allowed readers both to plumb their own inwardness and to distinguish themselves from others. In a culture of mass consumption, argues Lynch, possessing a belief in the inexpressible interior life of a character rendered one's property truly private.Ranging from Defoe and Smollett to Burney and Austen, Lynch's account will interest students of the novel, literary historians, and anyone concerned with the inner workings of consumer culture and the history of emotions.