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Edward Stratemeyer and the Stratemeyer Syndicate (Twayne's United States Authors Series) ePub download

by Deidre Johnson

  • Author: Deidre Johnson
  • ISBN: 0805740066
  • ISBN13: 978-0805740066
  • ePub: 1997 kb | FB2: 1123 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Twayne Pub; 1st Edition edition (August 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 195
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 181
  • Format: docx mbr mobi doc
Edward Stratemeyer and the Stratemeyer Syndicate (Twayne's United States Authors Series) ePub download

Series: Twayne's United States Authors Series (Book 627). Diedre Johnson's biography of Edward Stratemeyer leaves little, if anything, to be desired

Series: Twayne's United States Authors Series (Book 627). Hardcover: 195 pages. Diedre Johnson's biography of Edward Stratemeyer leaves little, if anything, to be desired. His entire history is covered here with, of course, special emphasis on his incredible "Syndicate" - a Syndicate which produced the most influential juvenile fiction of the 20th century (Tom Swift, Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew to mention but a few) and whose influence is still felt to this day. A must read for any fan of juvenile literature.

The Stratemeyer Syndicate was the producer of a number of mystery series for children, including Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys, the various Tom Swift series, the Bobbsey Twins, the Rover Boys, and others

The Stratemeyer Syndicate was the producer of a number of mystery series for children, including Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys, the various Tom Swift series, the Bobbsey Twins, the Rover Boys, and others. Created by Edward Stratemeyer, the Stratemeyer Syndicate was the first book packager to have its books aimed at children, rather than adults.

Diedre Johnson's biography of Edward Stratemeyer leaves little, if anything, to be desired.

Stratemeyer Syndicate - a type of production factory for series books. Edward Stratemeyer and the Stratemeyer Syndicate (Twayne's United States Authors Series). 0805740066 (ISBN13: 9780805740066).

After some publishing successes himself in the 1890s, he developed the Stratemeyer Syndicate - a type of production factory for series books. Stratemeyer would conceive ideas for series, draft an outline for each book, and hire writers to turn the outlines into full-length manuscripts, all published under pennames. Deidre Johnson has examined both the life and work of this astute businessman-writer, getting to the bottom of his phenomenal achievement.

Stratemeyer, Edward, 1862-1930 - Criticism and interpretation, Stratemeyer Syndicate - History, Literature publishing - United States .

Stratemeyer, Edward, 1862-1930 - Criticism and interpretation, Stratemeyer Syndicate - History, Literature publishing - United States - History - 20th century, Children's stories, American - History and criticism, Children's literature - Publishing - United States. New York : Twayne Publishers ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International. inlibrary; printdisabled; ibrary; phillipsacademy; americana.

Semantic Scholar extracted view of "Edward Stratemeyer and the Stratemeyer Syndicate" by. .oceedings{Johnson1993EdwardSA, title {Edward Stratemeyer and the Stratemeyer Syndicate}, author {Deidre A. Johnson}, year {1993} }. Deidre A. Johnson

Semantic Scholar extracted view of "Edward Stratemeyer and the Stratemeyer Syndicate" by Deidre A. Johnson.

Edward L. Stratemeyer (October 4, 1862 – May 10, 1930) was an American publisher and writer of children's fiction. He was one of the most prolific writers in the world, producing in excess of 1,300 books himself, selling in excess of 500 million copies. He also created many well-known fictional book series for juveniles, including The Rover Boys, The Bobbsey Twins, Tom Swift, The Hardy Boys, and Nancy Drew series, many of which sold millions of copies and are still in publication today.

Personal Name: Stratemeyer, Edward, 1862-1930 Criticism and interpretation. Corporate Name: Stratemeyer Syndicate History. 00F Author: Lèubbe, Hermann. 2. The Rising of the agricultural labourers; nine pamphlets and six broadsides, 1830-1831. by The Rising of the agricultural labourers; nine pamphlets and six broadsides, 1830-1831. ISBN: 0405044348 Publication & Distribution: New York

Edward Stratemeyer Learn about upcoming books and other projects about series book history.

Creator of dozens of series that influenced generations. Created by Edward Stratemeyer: Learn about the Ghostwriters for Carolyn Keene. Info from the forthcoming biography Yours Truly, Edward Stratemeyer: The Story of the Man Who Created Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys, and Other Books You Loved as a Child. Info from the forthcoming Series Book Encyclopedia. Series Books and Reprints for Sale. Syndicate Series Information. Learn about upcoming books and other projects about series book history.

In founding the Stratemeyer Syndicate, Edward Stratemeyer aimed to.

In founding the Stratemeyer Syndicate, Edward Stratemeyer aimed to produce books in an efficient, assembly-line fashion and to write them in such a way as to maximize their popularity. The first series that Stratemeyer created was the Rover Boys, published under the pseudonym Arthur M. Winfield. In 1930, Stratemeyer died, and the Syndicate was inherited by his two daughters, Harriet Stratemeyer and Edna Stratemeyer Squier All books would be part of a series.

Carolyn Keene, Laura Lee Hope, Franklin W. Dixon...these names are synonymous with some of the best-loved books of any American child: the Nancy Drew, Bobbsey Twins, and Hardy Boys series. Yet these names are as much fiction as are the books on which their names appear, because those books - and hundreds more - are actually the brain child of one Edward Stratemeyer.Born in 1862, this man was one of the most prolific children's writers in the United States, and he exploited the market to its fullest potential. After some publishing successes himself in the 1890s, he developed the Stratemeyer Syndicate - a type of production factory for series books. Stratemeyer would conceive ideas for series, draft an outline for each book, and hire writers to turn the outlines into full-length manuscripts, all published under pennames. The syndicate kept between 19 and 31 series in progress until Stratemeyer's death in 1930, when his daughters assumed control, publishing over 480 books. Not all the books were popular, but by experimenting with different types of series, using timely material, and reflecting prevailing social values, Edward Stratemeyer and the Syndicate offered readers vicarious wish fulfillment.Deidre Johnson has examined both the life and work of this astute businessman-writer, getting to the bottom of his phenomenal achievement. In addition to defining the practices of the syndicate, identifying some of its authors, and examining the evolution of many of the series, Johnson provides a comprehensiveness and succinctness in analyzing the viability and respectability of the Stratemeyers' considerable accomplishments.