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Kindred Brutes: Animals in Romantic-Period Writing (The Nineteenth Century Series) ePub download

by Christine Kenyon-Jones

  • Author: Christine Kenyon-Jones
  • ISBN: 0754603326
  • ISBN13: 978-0754603320
  • ePub: 1919 kb | FB2: 1679 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (May 3, 2018)
  • Pages: 240
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 124
  • Format: mobi doc lit rtf
Kindred Brutes: Animals in Romantic-Period Writing (The Nineteenth Century Series) ePub download

Charles E. Robinson, Professor of English, University of Delaware; Executive Director, The Byron Society of America 'Christine Kenyon-Jones has found a genuinely new area of interest within the much-studied field of early nineteenth-century English poetry.

Kindred Brutes book

Exploring the significance of animals in Romantic-period writing, this new. Start by marking Kindred Brutes: Animals in Romantic-Period Writing as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Exploring the significance of animals in Romantic-period writing, this new study shows how in this period they were seen as both newly . Christine Kenyon-Jones is Lecturer in English and Writer, Kings College London, UK. Библиографические данные.

Exploring the significance of animals in Romantic-period writing, this new study shows how in this period they were seen as both newly different from humankind (subjects in their own right, rather than simply humanity's tools or adjuncts) and also as newly similar, with the ability to feel and perhaps to think like human beings. Kindred Brutes: Animals in Romantic-period Writing Birmingham Byzantine and Ottoman Monographs Nineteenth century.

CHRISTINE KENYON-JONES, Kindred Brutes: Animals in Romantic-Period Writing. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2001. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Kenyon-Jones, Christine, Kindred Brutes: Animals in Romantic-Period Writing; UK: Ashgate Publishing. Morton, Timothy, Cultures of Taste/Theories of Appetite: Eating Romanticism; New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Morton, Timothy, "Joseph Ritson, Percy Shelley and the Making of Romantic Vegetarianism," Romanticism. Vol. 12, Issue 1. pp. 52–61.

series The Nineteenth Century Series. Books related to Kindred Brutes: Animals in Romantic-Period Writing. Exploring the significance of animals in Romantic-period writing, this new study shows how in this period they were seen as both newly different from humankind (subjects in their own right, rather than simply humanity's tools or adjuncts) and also as newly similar, with the ability to feel and perhaps to think like human beings.

Christine Kenyon-Jones blames the romantic poets for our modern-day uncertainty about animals in Kindred Brutes. Dr Kenyon-Jones's real interest, though, is in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries

Christine Kenyon-Jones blames the romantic poets for our modern-day uncertainty about animals in Kindred Brutes. Dr Kenyon-Jones's real interest, though, is in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries. Her burden is that the poets of that era, in particular, are the begetters of our current attitudes. Modern vegetarianism in the West is often motivated by simple abhorrence of rearing and killing animals to eat,' she writes, 'but a fear of the adverse physiological and psychological effects of meat-eating, similar to that current in the romantic period, has in our own time gained force from the BSE and other crises in meat-production.

others published Kindred Brutes: Animals in Romantic-Period Writing. Pullman's books foreground nonhumans and develop their characters.

Firstly, these technologies challenge the romantic idea of the innocent child (Coveney, 1982; Day, 1996). Secondly, and also in relation to romantic ideas, they challenge the romantic ideals of the child in nature, of children being outdoors, in 'the fresh air' and in contact with plants (Moore, 1989Moore,, 1997), animals (Kenyon-Jones, 2001) and wildness (Nabhan and Trimble, 1992). His three novels, however, belong to their human protagonists.

Reading Christine Kenyon-Jones’s Kindred Brutes: Animals in. .Christine Kenyon-Jones’s and David Perkins’s studies have comparable strengths.

Reading Christine Kenyon-Jones’s Kindred Brutes: Animals in Romantic-Period Writing and David Perkins’s Romanticism and Animal Rights together is a lesson in how rich a field of enquiry the animal in Romantic literature i. Both books make clear that the latter half of the eighteenth century witnessed an extraordinary increase in the amount of writing about animals. An obvious starting question might be why? though this detains neither scholar very much.

Similar books and articles. Christine KenyonJones. Modern Economic and Social History Series, 11. Kindred Brutes: Animals in RomanticPeriod Writing.

Exploring the significance of animals in Romantic-period writing, this new study shows how in this period they were seen as both newly different from humankind (subjects in their own right, rather than simply humanity's tools or adjuncts) and also as newly similar, with the ability to feel and perhaps to think like human beings. Approaches to animals are reviewed in a wide range of the period's literary work (in particular, that of Byron, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Southey, Clare and Blake). Poetry and other literary work are discussed in relation to discourses about animals in various contemporary cultural contexts, including children's books, parliamentary debates, vegetarian theses, encyclopaedias and early theories about evolution. The study introduces animals to the discussions about ecocriticism and environmentalism in Romantic-period writing by complicating the concept of 'Nature', and it also contributes to the debates about politics and the body in this period. It demonstrates the rich variety of thinking about animals in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, and it challenges the exclusion of literary writing from some recent multi-disciplinary debates about animals, by exploring the literary roots of many metaphors about and attitudes to animals in our current thinking. Kindred Brutes constitutes a genuinely original and substantial contribution both to Romantic-period writing and to general debates about animals and the body.
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