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'A Life Lived Quickly': Tennyson's Friend Arthur Hallam and His Legend ePub download

by Martin Blocksidge

  • Author: Martin Blocksidge
  • ISBN: 1845194187
  • ISBN13: 978-1845194185
  • ePub: 1834 kb | FB2: 1611 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Sussex Academic Press (January 1, 2011)
  • Pages: 323
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 706
  • Format: mbr lit docx rtf
'A Life Lived Quickly': Tennyson's Friend Arthur Hallam and His Legend ePub download

A Life Lived Quickly' book. Arthur Hallam's early death was the subject of Tennyson's celebrated poem In Memoriam.

A Life Lived Quickly' book. As a result of its popularity, Hallam became a legendary figure, very much accepted on Tennyson's terms as being almost divinely gifted and of immense promise. While this representation of Hallam has remained generally accepted, 'A Life Lived Quickly' seeks both to supplement and challen Arthur Hallam's early death was the subject of Tennyson's celebrated poem In Memoriam.

A life lived quickly'. Tennyson's friend Arthur Hallam and his legend. by Martin Blocksidge. Naturally disputatious : father and son 1811-1822. An unreformed education : Eton college 1822-1827

A life lived quickly'. An unreformed education : Eton college 1822-1827. A farewell to the south : Italy 1827-1828. Cambridge I hate intensely : Trinity college, 1828-1829. Living awfully fast : the apostles and Somersby 1829-1831. A young man of letters 1831-1833. I) The last of Cambridge. II) Mainly in London. A creature of great promise : death and transfiguration. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Arthur Henry Hallam (1 February 1811 – 15 September 1833) was an English poet, best known as the subject of a major work, "In Memoriam", by his close friend and fellow poet Alfred Tennyson. Hallam has been described as the jeune homme fatal (French for "fatal young man") of his generation. Hallam was born in London, son of the historian Henry Hallam. He attended school at Eton, where he met the future prime minister, William Ewart Gladstone.

Arthur Hallam's early death was the subject of Tennyson's celebrated poem In Memoriam.

A Life Lived Quickly' : Tennyson's Friend Arthur Hallam and His Legend. Offering a more detailed and objective portrait of Arthur Hallam, this biography presents Arthur Hallam as a complex and interesting character in his own right, supplementing and challenging his representation in Tennyson s celebrated poem In Memoriam. Hallam s early death was the subject of the poem, portraying him as almost divinely gifted and of immense promise, and after its publication he became a legendary figure.

Tennyson and Hallam grew closer throughout the year and Hallam even .

Tennyson and Hallam grew closer throughout the year and Hallam even joined the Tennysons for family holidays. He spent three Christmases with the Tennysons at their Somersby home. Upon his first visit, Hallam fell in love with Tennyson’s younger sister, 18-year-old Emily. Aside from being dear friends, Tennyson and Hallam worked on a book of poetry together. The first book had to be published in secret because Tennyson’s father didn’t approve. Nor did he approve of Hallam’s relationship with Emily. Hallam was forbidden from visiting Tennyson’s home until he was 21. However, in February 1831, Tennyson’s father died.

No full-length book was devoted to Tennyson, but Martin Blocksidge's biography of Arthur Henry Hallam, 'A Life Lived Quickly': Tennyson's Friend Arthur Hallam and His Legend (Sussex Academic Press), will interest Tennyson scholars.

Arthur Henry Hallam (1 February 1811 - 15 September 1833) was an English poet. He is best known as the subject of a major long poem, In Memoriam . by his best friend, fellow poet Alfred Tennyson. Hallam has been described as the jeune homme fatal ("fatal young man") of his generation. He attended school at Eton, where he met future Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone

Blocksidge, Martin, ''A life lived quickly: Tennyson’s friend Arthur Hallam and his legend '', Sussex Academic Press, 2010. Kolb, J. The Letters of Arthur Henry Hallam 1981 Ohio State University Press 0814203000.

Blocksidge, Martin, ''A life lived quickly: Tennyson’s friend Arthur Hallam and his legend '', Sussex Academic Press, 2010. Martin, R. B. Tennyson; The Unquiet Heart 1983 Clarendon Press Oxford 0571118429. Ricks, C. Tennyson, Macmillan, London, 486552.

A Life Lived Quickly’: Tennyson's Friend Arthur Hallam and his Legend, by Martin Blocksidge (pp. 156-158). Tales of Bluebeard and his Wives from Late Antiquity to Postmodern Times, by Shuli Barzilai (pp. 160-162).

Arthur Hallam's early death was the subject of Tennyson's celebrated poem In Memoriam. As a result of its popularity, Hallam became a legendary figure, very much accepted on Tennyson's terms as being almost divinely gifted and of immense promise. While this representation of Hallam has remained generally accepted, 'A Life Lived Quickly' seeks both to supplement and challenge it, offering a more detailed and objective portrait of the man. Important but largely unknown aspects of Hallam's life include: having a difficult relationship with his father (himself a famous literary figure), suffering a mental breakdown during his first year at Cambridge, and pursuing an extremely fraught love affair with Tennyson's sister in the face of opposition from both families. Additionally, the book repudiates the often-made suggestion that Hallam and Tennyson may have had a homosexual relationship. As well as examining Hallam's published writings, the book makes liberal use of his letters - of which a collected edition has been in existence since 1981 - and includes treatments of hitherto unpublished poems and more recently discovered letters. Apart from presenting Arthur Hallam as a complex and interesting character in his own right, the book offers insight into the literary culture of early 19th-century England. In devoting attention to Hallam's time at Eton and Cambridge, the book also deals in detail with the experience of being educated in those unreformed institutions. *** "...a thoroughly researched and rewarding biography and a valuable contribution to Tennyson studies." - Victorian Studies, Vol. 35, No. 1, Autumn 2012