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Crime and Punishment (My Penguin) ePub download

by Fyodor Dostoevsky

  • Author: Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • ISBN: 0140455426
  • ISBN13: 978-0140455427
  • ePub: 1579 kb | FB2: 1459 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Barnes & Noble Classics; New Ed edition (2007)
  • Pages: 720
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 989
  • Format: lrf rtf lit doc
Crime and Punishment (My Penguin) ePub download

Crime and punishment.

Crime and punishment. FYODOR MIKHAILOVICH DOSTOYEVSKY was born in Moscow in 1821 at the Mariinsky Hospital for the Poor, where his father worked as a doctor. His mother died in 1837 and his father two years later, rumoured to have been murdered by his serfs. The sentence was commuted by Tsar Nicholas I (1796-1855) at the last possible moment and in the most theatrical manner.

Penguin Classics Crime and Punishment. The two popular translations of ‘Crime and Punishment’ before the 1993 translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, were by Constance Garnett and David McDuff

Penguin Classics Crime and Punishment. Crime and Punishment: A New Translation. The two popular translations of ‘Crime and Punishment’ before the 1993 translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, were by Constance Garnett and David McDuff. The Pevear/Volokhonsky translation became my favourite – until Oliver Ready’s translation came along. Not knowing a word of Russian, I declare my favourite only by the enjoyment I derived from reading the book in English. Many things may indeed be lost in translation, and many others get misrepresented but we may not know.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky was born in Moscow in 1821

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky was born in Moscow in 1821. His debut, the epistolary novella Poor Folk (1846), made his name. In 1849 he was arrested for involvement with the politically subversive 'Petrashevsky circle' and until 1854 he lived in a convict prison in Omsk, Siberia.

Crime and Punishment book. There was a time in my life when I couldn’t get enough of reading Dostoevsky. Maybe because his books made me think so deeply about being human and how we choose to live our lives. I began with Crime and Punishment, probably the work he is best known for. What I remember is being fascinated by Dostoevsky’s brilliant understanding of human nature. I remember thinking what a deep study this book was; an incredible examination of a man who commits murder and how he is punished for it.

Do you know, my dear Anna Vasilievna, that even now such eccentric and extraordinary things utterl. Читать онлайн Crime and Punishment.

FYODOR DOSTOEVSKY CRIME AND PUNISHMENT Foreword I want to do an unprecedented and eccentric thing, to write thirty printed sheets within the space of four months, forming two separate novels, of which I will write one in the morning and the other in the evening, and to finish them by a fixed deadline. Do you know, my dear Anna Vasilievna, that even now such eccentric and extraordinary things utterl. Crime and punishment.

By Fyodor Dostoevsky Translated by Constance Garnett. About Crime and Punishment. Discover Book Picks from the CEO of Penguin Random House US. Close. By Fyodor Dostoevsky Translated by Constance Garnett. Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read. A desperate young man plans the perfect crime-the murder of a despicable pawnbroker, an old women no one loves and no one will mourn.

Читать бесплатно Crime and Punishment Fyodor Dostoevsky. Текст этой книги доступен онлайн: ound himself in during the summer of 1866

Читать бесплатно Crime and Punishment Fyodor Dostoevsky. Текст этой книги доступен онлайн: ound himself in during the summer of 1866.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky-"Don’t let us forget that the causes of human actions . Coke Navarro on Behance.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky-"Don’t let us forget that the causes of human actions are usually immeasurably more complex and varied than our subsequent explanations of them. The Idiot The dark Russian novelist's tale of the impossibility of being innocent in a corrupt society is a challenging but worthwhile read.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821–1881) was a Russian novelist, journalist, and short-story writer whose novels Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov rank among the greatest of the nineteenth century.

Querlaca
The two popular translations of ‘Crime and Punishment’ before the 1993 translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, were by Constance Garnett and David McDuff. The Pevear/Volokhonsky translation became my favourite – until Oliver Ready’s translation came along. Not knowing a word of Russian, I declare my favourite only by the enjoyment I derived from reading the book in English.

Many things may indeed be lost in translation, and many others get misrepresented but we may not know. The result of reading only the English versions is that one’s choice is largely subjective. Compared to the Garnett version, the Pevear/Volokhonsky translation seems very modern – until Ready’s came along. Little things like changing ‘had not’ to ‘hadn’t’ renders Ready’s version not only a little more modern but also more informal. That is not to say that the atmosphere of old Russia is lost. Ready uses ‘fibs’ for ‘lies’ (Pevear/Volokhonsky) in one passage.

Ultimately, the reader has to decide for himself which style he enjoys more. Here is a comparison from one of my favourite passages (there are many) from the book. I set out first the Pevear/Volokhonsky version then the Ready version:
“What do you think?” Razmumikhin shouted, raising his voice even more. “You think it’s because they’re lying? Nonsense! I like it when people lie! Lying is man’s only privilege over all other organisms. If you lie- you get to the truth! Lying is what makes me a man. Not one truth has ever been reached without lying fourteen times or so, maybe a hundred and fourteen, and that’s honourable in its way; well, but we can’t even lie with our minds! Lie to me, but in your own way, and I’ll kiss you for it. Lying in one’s own way is almost better than telling the truth in someone else’s way; in the first case you’re a man, and in the second – no better than a bird. The truth won’t go away, but life can be nailed shut; there are examples. (Pevear/Volokhonsky)

‘Now what are you thinking?’ cried Razumikhin, raising even more. ‘That it’s their lies I can’t stand? Nonsense! I like it when people lie. Telling lies is humanity’s sole privilege over other organism. Keep fibbing and you’ll end up with the truth! I’m only human because I lie. No truth’s ever been discovered without fourteen fibs along the way, if not one hundred and fourteen, and there’s honour in that. But our lies aren’t even our own! Lie to me by all means, but make sure it’s your own, and then I’ll kiss you. After all, lies of your own are almost better than someone else’s truth: in the first case you’re human; in the second you’re just a bird! The truth won’t run away, but life just might – wouldn’t be the first time.

Ready’s version has a table of chronological events and a fresh, inspiring introduction that will help the first-time reader understand and appreciate the context of ‘Crime and Punishment’
Coidor
This is Dostoyevski at his best - at least as far as this reader is concerned. This is a ‘complex’ story (in many respects) certainly with respect to the storyline: and, in the ‘typical’ Russian style, full of boiling emotion, honor, degradation and mystery. Rodion Romanovitch Raskolnikov, a young college drop-out, given to dark mood and brooding temperament sulks in his cramped, stuffy, oppressive little boarding house room and plans a murder. He has earlier published a pseudo-intellectual essay in which he postulates the ‘right’ of an ‘extraordinary’ person to even commit crime in the pursuit of a greater good. This ‘philosophy’ shared with the reader seems always in one way or another at the base of Rodion Romanovitch’s brooding conclusion:

“Yes, that’s what it was! I wanted to become a Napoleon, that is why I killed her. . . . Do you understand now?”

“I saw clear as daylight how strange it is that not a single person living in this mad world has had the daring to go straight for it all and send it flying to the devil! I . . . I wanted to have the daring . . . and I killed her. I only wanted to have the daring, Sonia! That was the whole cause of it!”

The storyline twists and turns and interleaves a series of characters that include the pathetic, the deceitful, the honorable, and the utterly hopeless. Dostoyevski makes the depth of the read much greater than the storyline itself, however. Raskolnikov is positively tortured within his own mind by the plan for murder, by the murder itself and by his pursuit by the predatory Investigating lawyer - Porfiry Petrovich. The writing amazes with its precision in describing the ebb and flood of emotion, scheming and shame that torment Raskolnikov. And, as usual in his novels, Dostoyevski explores the philosophical implications of good and bad, afterlife or darkness, and human consequence related to an interconnected universe. An old-fashioned Epilog ends the read giving the reader some 'closure' on Rodion and some moral 'conclusion' for Dostoyevski. Over 150 years old and still this book sets the high end for 5-stars.

Dover Thrift edition 2001, Translated By Constance Garnett
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