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The Truth About William Shakespeare: Fact, Fiction and Modern Biographies ePub download

by David Ellis

  • Author: David Ellis
  • ISBN: 0748646671
  • ISBN13: 978-0748646678
  • ePub: 1291 kb | FB2: 1720 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Edinburgh University Press; Reprint edition (October 30, 2013)
  • Pages: 192
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 654
  • Format: mbr lrf azw lrf
The Truth About William Shakespeare: Fact, Fiction and Modern Biographies ePub download

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The Truth About William . Ellis also explicitly exposes the tricks & techniques which Shakespeare biographers employ to expand a single sentence of FACT into the 50, 100 or even 1,000 words of historical-FICTION and pure conjecture which populate almost every page of every chapter of the modern Shakespeare biography. The fact that he does so with gentle mocking and oh-so-witty observations is a splendid bonus.

Start by marking The Truth about William Shakespeare: Fact . David Ellis was born in Lancashire, educated at Downing College Cambridge, and is emeritus professor of English Literature at the University of Kent in Canterbury.

Start by marking The Truth about William Shakespeare: Fact, Fiction and Modern Biographies as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. During his teaching career he has spent considerable periods in France, Italy, Australia and the United States.

How is it that biographies of Shakespeare can continue to appear when so little is known about him, and what is known has been in.Key Features: From this book, the reader can learn all that is directly known about Shakespeare.

How is it that biographies of Shakespeare can continue to appear when so little is known about him, and what is known has been in the public domain for so long? Why is it that a majority of the biographies published in the last decade have been written by distinguished Shakespeareans who ought to know better? . An exposé of the Shakespeare biography industry showing that books which are marketed as biographies of Shakespeare are nothing of the kind.

At the same time, by exploring efforts to write a life of Shakespeare along traditional lines, it asks what kind of animal "biography" really is and how it should be written. Edinburgh University Press.

A polemical attack on the ways recent Shakespeare biographers have disguised their lack of information. How can biographies of Shakespeare continue to appear when so little is known about him? And when what is known has been in the public domain for so long?

A polemical attack on the ways recent Shakespeare biographers have disguised their lack of information.

The truth about William Shakespeare : fact, fiction and modern biographies. Swot Tots Publishing. Shakespeare and Books.

How can biographies of Shakespeare continue to appear when so little is known about him? And when what is known has been in the public domain for so long?

Fact, Fiction and Modern Biographies.

Fact, Fiction and Modern Biographies. Robert Bearman, former Head of Archives, Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Not only, in my view, definitive in its treatment of its subject, but a pleasure to read. Every scholarly library should own it, and all readers interested in Shakespeare or biography.

The Truth about William Shakespeare: Fact, Fiction and Modern Biographies. Shakespeare as a Challenge for Literary Biography: A History of Biographies of Shakespeare since 1898. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2012. Shakespeare and the Catholic Religion. Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh University Press, 2000. Honigmann, E. A. J. Shakespeare: The Lost Years. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1985. Lampeter: Lampeter University Press, 2009. Phillips, Graham, and Martin Keatman.

Little Known, Unknown & Interesting Facts about William Shakespeare

Little Known, Unknown & Interesting Facts about William Shakespeare.

How can biographies of Shakespeare continue to appear when so little is known about him? And when what is known has been in the public domain for so long? In the past decade, the majority of these biographies have been published by distinguished Shakespeareans - shouldn't they know better? To solve this puzzle, David Ellis looks at the methods that Shakespeare's biographers have used to hide their lack of knowledge. At the same time, by exploring efforts to write a life of Shakespeare along traditional lines, it asks what kind of animal "biography" really is and how it should be written.
Modar
This is an excellent primer for the Shakespeare authorship question. Without going into that question - indeed somewhat bizarrely in my view Ellis dismisses the question in one line - Ellis's book shows just how pathetically empty is the field of orthodox Stratfordian biography.
FEISKO
For any fan of Shakespeare biography, this book is an absolute treasure...not only for the way it exposes the astonishingly dubious techniques of modern Shakespeare biographers, but also for the unfailing humor with which it does so.

David Ellis goes through the (often minimal) documented FACTS for every phase of Shakespeare's life and describes exactly how a range of modern biographers mold (and force-fit, if needs be) those facts into their overall narrative "vision" of the man. In the case of virtually every single biography discussed in the book, Ellis demonstrates that, while the facts themselves are minimal, the wide-ranging and often utterly contradictory theories / fantasies of his biographers are not.

Ellis also explicitly exposes the tricks & techniques which Shakespeare biographers employ to expand a single sentence of FACT into the 50, 100 or even 1,000 words of historical-FICTION and pure conjecture which populate almost every page of every chapter of the modern Shakespeare biography. The fact that he does so with gentle mocking and oh-so-witty observations is a splendid bonus.

Think of this book as an unauthorized "biography of the biographers"...a book which entertainingly explores the fact that the current empty-suit vision of Shakespeare is JUST what academics turned would-be pop-writers love best: A blank slate on which their own pet theories can be writ large...a blank page delightfully devoid of anything which might inconveniently contradict their own rhapsodizing notions.

Upon reading Ellis, it is clear that every Shakespeare biographer "finds" EXACTLY the author for whom they were searching.
Jake
The author wittily and convincingly attacks the "it might have been" comes to mean "it was" style of biography. It is a pleasure to read.
Olma
Dr. Ellis' very honest book exposes the chinks in the armor of his Shakespeare colleagues, and for that he privately acknowledges that he likely won't be popular with those colleagues. His book has a wealth of information, whether or not one agrees with his main thesis. Which is that the facts about William of Stratford simply don't give sufficient information to support fanciful biographies concocted over several centuries of "Bardology." If that feeds the flames of iconoclasts (such as Oxfordians), so be it -- because it is honest truth. As to academic scholars, they should be facing the fact that the only relevent biography we have of our Bard is what he inserted into his plays, the notoriously difficult to interpret allusions to topical events and matters that can be reasonably said to be about his private affairs. Among the latter, the allusions to Italian venues such as Milan, Florence, and Venice seem the most accurate and forceful. Carping about minor errors, such as the coast of Bohemia (which actually existed in 1575 under Rudolph II, who as King of Bohemia ruled Trieste), normally shows the deficiencies of the carpers. So, rather than ignoring Ellis' thesis because it poses inconvenient truths to received opinion, why not consider altering the opinion? Ron Hess (BeornsHallATearthlink.net)
Уou ll never walk alone
This is one pricey piece of work.

In short, Ellis posits that no one can effectively write a biography of the fellow traditionally identified as Shakespeare...because nothing is really known about the guy. Ellis is compelling, and he shrewdly exposes the absolute conjecture required of any biographer who attempts to piece together a life story of the Avon resident, no matter how abbreviated the biography may be.

Frankly, the Oxfordian faction should be drooling over this text for it unwittingly (or perhaps brilliantly), reinforces the logical and compelling conclusion that while "Shaksper" of Avon may have been an infrequent participant in London stage life, he could not have been the author of the masterpieces we enjoy today.
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