» » Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume XI: 1848-1851 (Journals Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson)

Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume XI: 1848-1851 (Journals Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson) ePub download

by A. W. Plumstead,William H. Gilman,Ruth H. Bennett,Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • Author: A. W. Plumstead,William H. Gilman,Ruth H. Bennett,Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • ISBN: 0674484746
  • ISBN13: 978-0674484740
  • ePub: 1419 kb | FB2: 1726 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Belknap Press (January 1, 1975)
  • Pages: 624
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 770
  • Format: doc azw txt azw
Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Volume XI: 1848-1851 (Journals  Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson) ePub download

Journals and Miscellan. by Ralph Waldo Emerson. The journals and notebooks included in this volume and covering in depth the years 1848 to 1851 reflect Emerson's preoccupations with the events of these often turbulent years in America

Journals and Miscellan. The journals and notebooks included in this volume and covering in depth the years 1848 to 1851 reflect Emerson's preoccupations with the events of these often turbulent years in America. On his return to Concord from his successful lecture t Like Goethe, Emerson wanted to be the cultural historian and interpreter of his age-its business, politics, discoveries.

Emerson's journals of 1847-1848 deal primarily with his second visit to Europe, occasioned by a British lecture . Series: Journals & Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson (Book 10). Hardcover: 652 pages

Emerson's journals of 1847-1848 deal primarily with his second visit to Europe, occasioned by a British lecture tour that began at Manchester and Liverpool in November of 1847, took him to Scotland in the following February, and concluded in London during June after he had spend a month as a sightseer in Paris. Hardcover: 652 pages. Publisher: Belknap Press (January 1, 1973).

There's no description for this book yet.

The journals and notebooks included in this volume and covering in depth the years 1848 to 1851 reflect Emerson's preoccupations with the events of these often turbulent years in America

The journals and notebooks included in this volume and covering in depth the years 1848 to 1851 reflect Emerson's preoccupations with the events of these often turbulent years in America.

These notebooks contain materials Emerson collected for the composition of his lectures, articles, and essays during those years. Journals & Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 2 x . 0.

Related items to consider. Ralph Waldo Emerson, William Henry Gilman, J. E Parsons. Create This Book 2: Volume 2 by Moriah Elizabeth (Paperback, 2018). 9). £1. 3 New. -- Used. The Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson: Volume III 1826. Journals and Miscellaneous Notebooks of Ralph Waldo Emerson,. Mrs Hinch: The Activity Journal (2019, Hardback).

Volume VI, 1824-38}, author {Carl Bode and Ralph Waldo Emerson and Ralph H. Orth}, year {1968} }. Carl Bode, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ralph H. Orth.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century

Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States.

Like Goethe, Emerson wanted to be the cultural historian and interpreter of his age--its business, politics, discoveries. The journals and notebooks included in this volume and covering in depth the years 1848 to 1851 reflect Emerson's preoccupations with the events of these often turbulent years in America.

On his return to Concord from his successful lecture trip to England and visit to Paris in 1847-1848, Emerson resumed his familiar life of writer, thinker, and lecturer. Impressions of his recent European travels appear in passages in this volume which are used later in English Traits (1856). He writes of technological and scientific discoveries in America and abroad--one of which, the discovery of ether, was to involve his brother-in-law in legal embroilment. He ponders the meaning, for "the age" or "the times," of reports on the Dew textile mills in Lawrence, Massachusetts, of faster steamers daily breaking records, of new geological and paleontological findings, of theories of race, and many other matters that were coming increasingly to the fore in the mid-nineteenth century. Many passages on these topics, used first in lectures, later appear in his essays "Fate," "Wealth," and "Power" in Conduct of Life (1860). He was also adding to his critical biographies for Representative Men (1850), with special attention to Swedenborg, always a source of particular interest for Emerson.

Between 1850 and 1853, Emerson traveled farther west to lecture than he had hitherto ventured--to Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, St. Louis, and many other cities in the midwest. One notebook in the present volume records his customary percipient observations of places and people encountered during these western trips.

The tragic drowning of Margaret Fuller Ossoli and her family on her return from Italy in 1850 prompted Emerson to consider a collaboration on her life and writings, and another notebook printed here contains her memorabilia, including original entries by Emerson. Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli by Emerson, William Henry Charming, and James Freeman Clarke was published in 1852.

Passage of the Fugitive Slave Law in 1850 brought to a boil something in Emerson that had long been simmering. Concerned with slavery, freedom, and the future of the black population in America more than his public record had shown, he now delivered himself of an outburst--pained, vitriolic, ironic--a more sustained response to a single issue than appears elsewhere in all his journals. In this latest move in a compounding national tragedy he could see only chicanery and deterioration, the crumbling of America's moral fiber. He saw the Fugitive Slave Law in a larger context of a sick age; like Tennyson and Arnold in England, he lamented in moods of spite and chagrin the loss of faith and of an old world where political men of honor stood firm for the moral law. Most of his journal outburst went into his addresses "The Fugitive Slave Law," 1851 and 1854.