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The Odes of Horace (Johns Hopkins New Translations from Antiquity) ePub download

by Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus),Jeffrey H. Kaimowitz,Ronnie Ancona

  • Author: Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus),Jeffrey H. Kaimowitz,Ronnie Ancona
  • ISBN: 0801889952
  • ISBN13: 978-0801889950
  • ePub: 1997 kb | FB2: 1884 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (October 20, 2008)
  • Pages: 208
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 329
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The Odes of Horace (Johns Hopkins New Translations from Antiquity) ePub download

by Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus) (Author), Jeffrey H. Kaimowitz (Translator), Ronnie Ancona (Introduction) & 0 more. These new translations of the Odes capture the freshness and ingenuity of the originals.

by Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus) (Author), Jeffrey H. For readers of Latin, they offer a companionable appreciation that recreates the thrill of direct encounter with the originals.

Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus) Horace and The Odes are introduced in lively fashion by noted classicist Ronnie Ancona.

Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus). This groundbreaking new translation of Horace's most widely read collection of poetry is rendered in modern, metrical English verse rather than the more common free verse found in many other translations. Jeffrey H. Kaimowitz adapts the Roman poet's rich and metrically varied poetry to English formal verse, reproducing the works in a way that maintains fidelity to the tone, timbre, and style of the originals while conforming to the rules of English prosody. Horace and The Odes are introduced in lively fashion by noted classicist Ronnie Ancona.

Horace, Jeffrey H. Kaimowitz, Ronnie Ancona.

This groundbreaking new translation of Horace’s most widely read collection of poetry is rendered in modern, metrical English verse rather than the more common free verse found in many other translations.

translated by Jeffrey H. n by Ronnie Ancona.

The Odes of Horace (Johns Hopkins New Translations from Antiquity). The Third Book of Horace's Odes (Paperback). Published May 15th 1969 by Oxford University Press, USA. Paperback, 174 pages. Published September 16th 2008 by Johns Hopkins University Press.

The Odes of Horace Jeffrey H. Kaimowitz has a P. in classics with a specialty in Roman poetry and is the head librarian of the Watkinson Library at Trinity College, Connecticut.

By Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus) Introduction by Ronnie Ancona, Translated by Jeffrey H. Kaimowitz. Johns Hopkins University Press. This groundbreaking new translation of Horace’s most widely read collection of poetry is rendered in modern, metrical English verse rather than the more common free verse found in many other translations. He has published a number of translations as well as articles relating to classics and publishing in the Renaissance.

Quintus Horatius Flaccus (8 December 65 BC – 27 November 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace (/ˈhɒrɪs/), was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian)

Quintus Horatius Flaccus (8 December 65 BC – 27 November 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace (/ˈhɒrɪs/), was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus (also known as Octavian). The rhetorician Quintilian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: "He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words.

This groundbreaking new translation of Horace’s most widely read collection of poetry is rendered in modern, metrical English verse rather than the more common free verse found in many other translations. Jeffrey H. Kaimowitz adapts the Roman poet's rich and metrically varied poetry to English formal verse, reproducing the works in a way that maintains fidelity to the tone, timbre, and style of the originals while conforming to the rules of English prosody. Each poem is true to the sense and aesthetic pleasure of the Latin and carries with it the dignity, concision, and movement characteristic of Horace’s writing.

Kaimowitz presents each translation with annotations, providing the context necessary for understanding and enjoying Horace's work. He also comments on textual instability and explains how he constructed his verse renditions to mirror Horatian Latin.

Horace and The Odes are introduced in lively fashion by noted classicist Ronnie Ancona.

Burilar
Amazon has clearly mixed up the reviews for two different translations of Horace! I have read the Kaimowitz translation and have heard a reading of the tranlation; it is lovely. The author attempts to make the English translation have the same feeling and tone as the original Latin and succeeds admirably, according to my friends who know the poems in the original Latin. What I admire is the intimacy between the reader and Horace that the author has managed to create. I feel as if the span of centuries has been bridged and I have entered Horace's world, evesdropping on his conversation. Amazon does an injustice to this edition by muddling the ratings and reviews with a less-liked translation by another author.
Humin
These new translations of the Odes capture the freshness and ingenuity of the originals. For readers of Latin, they offer a companionable appreciation that recreates the thrill of direct encounter with the originals. For any reader, the translations convey the excitement of penetrating the puzzles of the Latin to discover the edginess of Rome's predominant lyric innovator.

Horace invented the short meditative form that dominates twenty-first century poetry. He was also one of the first important figures in the Western literary tradition to speak as a whole person and not merely as a representative of his social group or as a disembodied conduit of human feeling. Kaimowitz's versions fully convey the specificity of Horace's human voice, getting over into English the surprising twists of his thought, and the strength of his view of life.

The translations manage to do this by following the inner course of each poem on several levels. No English counterpart can faithfully recreate the sentence structure of the originals. The highly inflected nature of the Latin language renders the position of a word in a sentence unnecessary in determining its grammatical role. Horace uses the consequent flexibility of his language to multiply the nuances of a sentence, for example, by allowing an adjective to precede by several lines the noun it modifies, or again by withholding the verb of a sentence for a long delayed appearance, leaving the much earlier encountered subject and object of the sentence in suspense.

Kaimowitz takes aim at the resulting subtlety and relentlessly follows Horace's underlying message, by imitating the order in which elements of his thought are displayed in the original, and by devising equivalents that stretch the grammatical and structural possibilities of English but nevertheless achieve a rare grace of their own.

The inward sense of the originals is also partly conveyed by the fidelity of these translations to the metrical shape of the Latin poems. Horace was himself borrowing meters from the already centuries-old Greek lyric tradition. It is fitting that these translations strive to accomplish a metrical revival like Horace's own. In the process, they take on a compact, burnished look like that of the poems they stand for.
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