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How the Heather Looks: A Joyous Journey to the British Sources of Children's Books ePub download

by Joan Bodger

  • Author: Joan Bodger
  • ISBN: 0771011296
  • ISBN13: 978-0771011290
  • ePub: 1649 kb | FB2: 1240 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Emblem Editions; Reprint edition (February 16, 2010)
  • Pages: 264
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 183
  • Format: docx mbr mobi azw
How the Heather Looks: A Joyous Journey to the British Sources of Children's Books ePub download

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Although lovers of children's books may be mesmerized briefly, Bodger's re-published joyous journey reveals that post-modern . Citation: Lorinda B. Cohoon.

Although lovers of children's books may be mesmerized briefly, Bodger's re-published joyous journey reveals that post-modern readers cannot be easily transported by either the cultural values or the exclusively white and middle-class childhood reading promoted in this celebration.

Over forty years ago, Joan Bodger, her husband, and two children went to Britain on a very special family quest. They were seeking the world that they knew and loved through children’s books. In Winnie-the-Pooh Country. They were seeking the world that they knew and loved through children's books. In Winnie-the-Pooh Country, Mrs. Milne showed them the way to "that enchanted place on the top of the Forest where] a little boy and his Bear will always be playing.

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Milne showed them the way to that enchanted place on the top of the Forest a little boy and his Bear will always be playing. In Edinburgh they stood outside Robert Louis Stevenson’s childhood home, tilting their heads to talk to a lamplighter who was doing his job.

How the Heather Looks by Joan Bodger has been described as the book that most librarians would steal. It deserves to be better known and if you love British children's books you'll want to go on this journey which Bodger took with her own family to the places in England where those stories took place. Over forty years ago, Joan Bodger, her husband, and two children went to Britain on a very special family quest. Old Books Children's Books Book Authors Books To Read Paperback Books Vintage Book Covers Vintage Books Antique Books Book Cover Art.

How the Heather Looks. A Joyous Journey to the British Sources of Children’s Books.

Bodger's first book was How the Heather Looks: A Joyous Journey to the British Sources of Children's Books (1960), which told of a summer visit to England where she and her family sought the locations of classic children's stories, such as written by Rudyard Kipling, A. A. Milne, Arthur. Milne, Arthur Ransome and others. Soon after, her "daughter, Lucy, died at the age of seven, her first husband became schizophrenic, and their son disappeared in the streets of San Francisco.

Over forty years ago, Joan Bodger, her husband, and two children went to Britain on a very special family quest. They were seeking the world that they knew and loved through children’s books.In Winnie-the-Pooh Country, Mrs. Milne showed them the way to “that enchanted place on the top of the Forest [where] a little boy and his Bear will always be playing.” In Edinburgh they stood outside Robert Louis Stevenson’s childhood home, tilting their heads to talk to a lamplighter who was doing his job. In the Lake District they visited Jemima Puddle-Duck’s farm, and Joan sought out crusty Arthur Ransome to talk to him about Swallows and Amazons. They spent several days “messing about in boats” on the River Thames, looking for Toad Hall and other places described by Kenneth Grahame in The Wind in the Willows. Mud and flood kept them from attaining the slopes of Pook’s Hill (on Rudyard Kipling’s farm), but they scaled the heights of Tintagel. As in all good fairy tales, there were unanswered questions. Did they really find Camelot? Robin Hood, as always, remains elusive.One thing is certain. Joan Bodger brings alive again the magic of the stories we love to remember. She persuades us that, like Emily Dickinson, even if we “have never seen a moor,” we can imagine “how the heather looks.”First published in 1965 by Viking in New York, How the Heather Looks has become a prized favorite among knowledgeable lovers of children’s literature. Precious, well-thumbed copies have been lent out with caution and reluctance, while new admirers have gone searching in vain for copies to buy second-hand. This handsome reprint, with a new Afterword by Joan Bodger, makes a unique and delightful classic available once more.From the Hardcover edition.
Stan
This is undoubtedly one of the best books I have ever read. As a former teacher, I had still not read all of the children's books mentioned in How the Heather Looks, but it did not matter. Joan Bodger wove her magic tale and explained references in detail. Her style is beautiful--I felt like I was on the trip with her and her family. An excellent read that I used as a text per our homeschooling curriculum--but I shall undoubtedly re-read several more times!
Akinohn
We have a fondness for British children's literature from the early 20th century. When I learned about this book through our homeschool curriculum, it seemed like a good bet. My oldest was supposed to read it the following term. However, as soon as the book arrived in the house, my middle child read it in every spare minute over the next couple of days. The older child finished it within a day or two later. We have not gotten around to discussing the book yet, but their enthusiasm for it makes me think the discussion will be lively.
Mr.Twister
This book was written in 1958. A family goes to England for a summer holiday and travels to many different sites to see where a number of famous children's books were written. They have a 10 year old son and a 2 year old daughter. It is absolutely delightful and FULL of good authors and books! Highly recommended!
Darksinger
What a dear glimpse into a once-in-a-lifetime journey through England with a couple and their two young children! I enjoyed reading about all the books that brought them to each site. And it's bittersweet to read about their family after the return home.
Fenius
Beautifully written by a naturalist. We used this in our homeschool and the children didn't just learn about the natural world, they "experienced" it! We used it in Jr. High school ages, can also be used in high school.
Ionzar
How the Heather Looks by Joan Bodger is quite well written, it can be slightly boring at times, but overall is pretty good.

The book is about a family of four who visit england to find the sources of popular children's literature.
They visit many different places including Beatrix Potter's home, Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Bronte's home, etc. etc.

The Chapters and the main subjects in them, below;

Chap. 1 Whitchurch, Randolph Caldecott.
Chap. 2 Beatrix Potter's ''The Tailor of Gloucester''
Chap. 3 Narnia.
Chap. 4 King Arthur
Chap. 5 Camelot
Chap. 6 Wind in the Willows
Chap. 7 Johnny Crow
Chap. 8 Rudyard Kipling
Chap. 9 Winnie the Pooh, The Borrowers.
Chap. 10 Robin Hood, Frances Hodgson Burnett- The little Princess, The Secret Garden, Etc. Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Bronte, and Robert Louis Stevenson. *** My favorite chapter***
Chap. 11 Beatrix Potter, Arthur Ransome- Swallows and Amazons.
(written by my 13 year old daughter.)

Now I will write mine!
joy to the world!

This book was very popular when it came out and was reported most stolen by retiring children's librarians.
It covers many sites of popular English children's classics, and talks about how they got to the site, what they felt on finding it, and how it appeared, and who they met, as well as where they stayed.
(written by 15 year old son.)
Rocksmith
Arrived in a timely fashion exactly as described. Thank you!
You're enjoyment of "How the Heather Looks" may be in direct proportion to your ability to instantly recall scenes from classic British children's books. And not just the "classic" classics, mind you, but some rather obscure works indeed, classic for their quality instead of their familiarity. Do you know the illustrated verses of Randolph Caldecott? How about Arthur Ransome's "Swallows and Amazons" or Kipling's "Puck of Pook's Hill?"
I found that my interest waxed and waned along with my familiarity. I was thrilled to go to Tintagel and Sherwood Forest in search of King Arthur and Robin Hood. I delighted to visit with Mrs. Millne in the Hundred Acre Wood of Winnie the Pooh. Toad Hall and Rat's Riverbank are well-traveled terrain. Less so are the lands of The Borrower's, or the Gypsy Caravans or Pook's Hill. (I winced when they drove past Anlwick Castle without stoping. They missed out on quite an experience.)
The writing is very much like that of a person keeping a journal. Details do not fit into a story, and the narrative drifts along with the same randomness of the family. The only voice is Joan Bodger's, and her husband and children are foils for her to act upon.
All in all, it is a very pleasant little book that I enjoyed reading. I know I would have enjoyed it more if I had a library of British children's literature to browse through for familiarity.
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