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Fever (Contemporary American Fiction) ePub download

by John Edgar Wideman

  • Author: John Edgar Wideman
  • ISBN: 0140143475
  • ISBN13: 978-0140143478
  • ePub: 1660 kb | FB2: 1377 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: History & Criticism
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; First Edition edition (October 1, 1990)
  • Pages: 176
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 414
  • Format: lrf doc mbr txt
Fever (Contemporary American Fiction) ePub download

Which is too bad, because Wideman's got a lot to say. Wideman covers much the same ground as Graham Swift- the relationships between two human beings, whoever those two human beings may be.

American like you, Mrs. Clara. John Edgar Wideman, Fever.

Fever Quotes Showing 1-2 of 2. They killed everyone in the camps. American like you, Mrs. They said she was a dancer and could play any instrument. Said she could line up shoes from many countries and hop from one pair to the next, performing the dances of the world.

Wideman may be the finest American writer no one's ever heard o.

Wideman tends a little more towards the family side of things than does Swift, leading to a bit more variation on the theme, but the theme usually stays the same, how relationships end. They do not all end badly, by any means, as they do in Swift and so many other authors. They do not all end within the scope of the stories presented.

John Edgar Wideman is the award-winning author of more than 20 books, which have received two PEN/ Faulkner Awards and a National Book Award nomination. In addition to his authorial career, he is a professor at Brown University. His latest book, Writing to Save a Life: The Louis Till File, was published in 2016.

John Edgar Wideman (born June 14, 1941) is an American author of novels, memoirs, short stories, essays, and other works. Among the most critically acclaimed American writers of his generation, he was the first person to win the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction twice. His writing is known for experimental techniques and a focus on the African-American experience.

Information about the book, Fever (Contemporary American Fiction): the Fiction, Paperback, by John Edgar .

Information about the book, Fever (Contemporary American Fiction): the Fiction, Paperback, by John Edgar Wideman (Penguin Books, Oct 01, 1990). More books like Fever (Contemporary American Fiction) may be found by selecting the categories below: Fiction, General. Literary Criticism, American, African American. Tell us what do you think about Fever (Contemporary American Fiction).

Used availability for John Edgar Wideman's Fever. October 1989 : USA Hardback. January 1991 : UK Paperback.

Erik Madigan Heck for The New York Times. Skip to content Skip to site index. John Edgar Wideman Against the World. Late in a career marked by both triumph and tragedy, the fiercely independent author has written a new book exploring the unsettling case of Emmett Till’s father - and the isolation of black men in America. Erik Madigan Heck for The New York Times. Supported by. Continue reading the main story.

John Edgar Wideman John Edgar Wideman. The Drue Heinz Literature Prize was established in 1980 to encourage and support the writing and reading of short fiction.

A philosopher, psychiatrist, and political activist, Frantz Fanon was a fierce, acute critic of racism and oppression. Born of African descent in Martinique in 1925, Fanon fought in defense of France during World War II but later against France in Algeria's war for independence.

By turns subtle and intense, disturbing and elusive, the stories in this collection are ultimately connected by themes of memory and loss, reality and fabrication, and by a richless of language that rests lightly on its carefully foundation.
Monn
Each time I pick up a book by Wideman I'm always reminded of how awesome a writer he is. Outstanding.
Arilak
Wideman may be the finest American writer no one's ever heard of. Much of his early work has been allowed to run out of print and fade into obscurity; he remains a critical darling, popping up in _The Best American Short Stories_ and editing black-literature anthologies, yet he's never found a popular audience. Which is too bad, because Wideman's got a lot to say.

Wideman covers much the same ground as Graham Swift-- the relationships between two human beings, whoever those two human beings may be. Wideman tends a little more towards the family side of things than does Swift, leading to a bit more variation on the theme, but the theme usually stays the same, how relationships end. They do not all end badly, by any means, as they do in Swift and so many other authors. They do not all end within the scope of the stories presented. But hanging over Wideman's work is always the feeling that relationships between people _will_ end, somewhere along the line.

As in Swift, though, the similarity of tone and mood to be found in the various stories in this collection don't make it monotonous. Wideman gives us an interesting array of characters to examine, puts them into everyday situations, then throws something into the mix to jazz it up a little-- a blind man who never misses a shot from the free-throw line, a pianist who won't stop describing a dream long enough for his brother to tell him of the death of their mother (because, we can tell, he is already aware), etc. Wideman has a keen ear for the natural flow of language, and it both heightens his dialogue and keeps the descriptive parts of the stories flowing.

The one place Wideman does falter is in letting the message override the storytelling in places. The title story in this collection works when Wideman is painting a scene, just as all his other stories work, but every once in a while the agenda gets in the way and the story flattens into polemic. Wideman never, though, allows the polemic to take over completely, and he's always able to successfully pull himself back from the brink. (In his defense, the ending of "Fever" is fantastic, a truly strong piece of writing, that more than makes up for the story's faults.)

As with most of the books Wideman published before 1991, this is out of print at present. However, it's worth hunting down. A wonderful introduction to a wonderful author. *** 1/2
Dori
Weak. Not good enough.
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