» » The Thrill of Fear: 250 Years of Scary Entertainment

The Thrill of Fear: 250 Years of Scary Entertainment ePub download

by Walter M. Kendrick

  • Author: Walter M. Kendrick
  • ISBN: 0802111629
  • ISBN13: 978-0802111623
  • ePub: 1200 kb | FB2: 1391 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Grove Pr; 1 edition (November 1, 1991)
  • Pages: 292
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 600
  • Format: lrf lrf mobi azw
The Thrill of Fear: 250 Years of Scary Entertainment ePub download

Kendrick notes several paradoxes relating to the roots of horror fiction. Covering 250 years of literature and art is an awesome task, but Kendrick attacks it with aplomb and pulls it off just as neatly as you please

Kendrick notes several paradoxes relating to the roots of horror fiction. Covering 250 years of literature and art is an awesome task, but Kendrick attacks it with aplomb and pulls it off just as neatly as you please. This most entertaining book is highly reccommended to anyone with an interest in the horrid and the macabre - from Gothic novels to EC comics to the gore-filled mayhem that passes for horror movies these days; it's all here!

Walter Kendrick provides an answer with this authoritative history of 250 years of horror as entertainment.

Walter Kendrick provides an answer with this authoritative history of 250 years of horror as entertainment.

Kendrick, Walter M. Publication date. Psychology, Film - General, Pop Arts, Pop Culture, Horror tales, English, Horror tales, American, Popular literature, Horror films, Horror in literature, Death in literature, Amusements. New York : Grove Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on December 11, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

The Thrill of Fear : Two-Hundred and Fifty Years of Scary Entertainment. com User, April 3, 2010. I am somewhat fond of horror books and movies, but I am not what Walter Kendrick would call a "slasher maven"

The Thrill of Fear : Two-Hundred and Fifty Years of Scary Entertainment. by Walter M. Kendrick. I am somewhat fond of horror books and movies, but I am not what Walter Kendrick would call a "slasher maven". It's the old fashioned stuff stuff that I like: horror films from the thirties, traditional ghost stories, gothic novels, Weird Tales anthologies.

Kendrick finds horror to be a primarily emotional medium, with its roots in the 18th-century & of intentional emotionality: & fright is a kind of connoisseurship, a deliberate indulgence that recognizes no aim beyond itself. By century's end, he shows, with the appearance of Graveyard poetry and the novels The Castle of Otranto and The Monk, horror's course had been set, with the obsession with the past and sepulchral settings, even the tendency to graphically depicted terrors, all in place.

The thrill of fear : Holdings. Main Author: Kendrick, Walter M. Format: Book. The thrill of fear : 250 years of scary entertainment /. Saved in: Main Author: Kendrick, Walter M.

by Walter M. Hollywood, Celebs,TV,Movies,Entertainment, Fashion, Models.

250 Years of scary Entertainment. 250 Years of scary Entertainment. Kendrick is professor of English at Fordham University, and in this book he provides an answer as to why we are fascinated by just the things we should run screaming from. Kendrick's perceptive, humorous and lively history follows the unquiet dead through Dracula, . comics and Stephen King. The book is in good condition. The text is clean and crisp. The only mark is in pencil on inside fly page.

Kendrick (English, Fordham U.) traces our tastes and expectations of the horror tale in literature and the performing arts. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.
Steamy Ibis
As described. Fast ship. Would use again.
Dikus
This book maps a history of horror through literature, theatre, and movies. From the obscure to the mainstream, the author shows the depth of his research. He refers to such work as "horrid" literature. After reading, I don't think he intends to disregard the tradition, but I think he is trying to maintain distance.
The text follows a linear train of thought as it goes from the Graveyard Poets to more modern movies. As it progresses, the author continues to link how a particular book or film borrowed an element or two from a previous work. From this, all horror sounds formulaic and was stolen from some place else. This is misleading. Most works borrow from others. The thrill comes in mastering the elements or giving them a twist. I was disappointed that more was not said of H.P. Lovecraft, but that's just my wish.
After reading this book, I feel that the same came be done for most genres. Every genre has particular conventions and cliches that are used to get a specific response from the reader. Crypts create a sense of terror. A quest means growth or coming of age. A sandy beach at sunset means romance is brewing. This is what makes a genre a genre.
One of the benefits of the book is the bibliography. Any fan of horror, gothic or slasher, will learn of more books to read.
I would not recommend the book for casual reading. I would recommend it if you are a horror enthusiast looking for new authors.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
I am somewhat fond of horror books and movies, but I am not what Walter Kendrick would call a "slasher maven". It's the old fashioned stuff stuff that I like: horror films from the thirties, traditional ghost stories, gothic novels, _Weird Tales_ anthologies. Like Kendrick, I believe that horror media contains the "occasional genius" (xxvi) but that it is mostly "infatuated collectors, mad self-dramatizers, scrambling hacks, stern remonstrators, fools, gulls, [and] lunatics" (_ibid_). It is not a field that has engendered many classics, but it has provided a certain amount of fun.

_The Thrill of Fear: 250 Years of Scary Entertainment_ (1991) is a scholarly study that traces the roots of horror back to the mid-eighteenth century with the resurgence of Graveyard poetry (such as Gray's _Elegy_), sentimental romances (such as _The Sorrows of Young Werther_), the gothic novel (like Walpole's _Castle of Otranto_), melodramatic plays, and accounts of "true life crimes".

In later years, horror fiction became more "Genrified" into _Weird Tales_ stories, pulp fiction, E.C. horror comics, and monster movies. In recent years, the horror industry has become more graphically violent with horror being the main emotion intended to be raised among the audience. (Earlier works of horror aimed for other emotions in addition to horror.) Kendrick argues that the violence may in fact recede over time.

Kendrick notes several paradoxes relating to the roots of horror fiction. At a time when cemeteries were becoming more sanitary and modern, the public thought of them as gloomy and horrific sites with yew trees, owls, ravens, and crypts-- sites for murder or (at the very least) Dark Meditations on Mortality. Gothic castles totally unlike real medieval castles anchored themselves in the popular imagination. (They later evolved into Old Dark Houses.) Rotting bodies and faces were also popular. They had actually been around before in paintings and statuary. But before, they were _familiar_. Now, they were to be _feared_.

Kendrick repeatedly uses the terms "horrible books" and "horrible movies". He claims that his reason is purely descriptive, that he does not want them confused with "gothic architecture". In this, I believe that Kendrick is being disingenuous. They are terms that invite ridicule. While much of horror fiction/movies is pretty awful stuff, I believe that Mary Shelly, J.S. Le Fanu, and M.R. James deserve higher accord than Kendrick gives them. Even lesser writers like W.W. Jacobs, F. Marion Crawford, and Robert Bloch were a bit more than miserable hacks grinding out potboilers.

On the balance, though, this is an excellent and well-written study. It is a reminder that Stephen King and Ramsey Campbell had their predecessors-- and that they were not exactly like what we take for granted today.
Fearlessdweller
This book seems as if it were written to impress a tenure committee. The author clearly doesn't like horror literature, and his constant jibes at the works he discusses, though occasionally amusing, make one wonder why he has spent so much time on the subject. As you might expect from a critic who doesn't "get" the genre, his readings are shallow. M. R. James, for example, is portrayed as merely a skillful purveyor of gore. Worse, Kendrick reads all the works as having the same meaning. In his view, an attachment to such literature is puerile.
I did learn a few things from this book--for example, the history of horror in the theater was mostly new to me, and probably will be to many genre addicts. On the whole, though, the author simply knows less about his subject than most of his readers will.
Vuzahn
_The Thrill of Fear_ is the rarest of books -- a scholarly study that can be read and enjoyed by the layman. Covering 250 years of literature and art is an awesome task, but Kendrick attacks it with aplomb and pulls it off just as neatly as you please. This most entertaining book is highly reccommended to anyone with an interest in the horrid and the macabre -- from Gothic novels to EC comics to the gore-filled mayhem that passes for horror movies these days; it's all here!
E-Books Related to The Thrill of Fear: 250 Years of Scary Entertainment: