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More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary ePub download

by M. R. James

  • Author: M. R. James
  • ISBN: 0486257002
  • ISBN13: 978-0486257006
  • ePub: 1844 kb | FB2: 1811 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Dover Pubns; Dover ed edition (July 1, 1988)
  • Pages: 116
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 727
  • Format: lrf rtf doc mbr
More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary ePub download

Part 2: more ghost stories. A School Story The Rose Garden The Tractate Middoth Casting the Runes The Stalls of Barchester Cathedral Martin's Close Mr Humphreys and his Inheritance.

Part 2: more ghost stories. A School Story The Rose Garden The Tractate Middoth Casting the Runes The Stalls of Barchester Cathedral Martin's Close Mr Humphreys and his Inheritance part 1: ghost stories of an antiquary. If anyone is curious about my local settings, let it be recorded that StBertrand de Comminges and Viborg are real places: that in 'Oh, Whistle,and I'll Come to You' I had Felixstowe in mind.

Some more details of itwill have to be given, though I cannot hope to put before you the look ofthe picture as clearly as it. .What in the world Mr Britnell could mean byaffixing the price of L2 2s. to such an object was more than Mr Williamscould imagine

Some more details of itwill have to be given, though I cannot hope to put before you the look ofthe picture as clearly as it is present to my own eye. Very nearly theexact duplicate of it may be seen in a good many old inn parlours, or inthe passages of undisturbed country mansions at the present moment. to such an object was more than Mr Williamscould imagine. He turned it over with a good deal of contempt; upon theback was a paper label, the left-hand half of which had been torn of. ll that remained were the ends of two lines of writing; the first hadthe letters- ngley Hall ; the second,- ssex.

Mrs Bunch was much impressed next morning by his story, and went so faras to replace the muslin curtain over the glazed door . A Thin Ghost and Others. Ghost Stories of an Antiquary Part 2: More Ghost Stories. Ghost Stories of an Antiquary. Collected Ghost Stories.

Mrs Bunch was much impressed next morning by his story, and went so faras to replace the muslin curtain over the glazed door of the bathroom. MrAbney, moreover, to whom he confided his experiences at breakfast, wasgreatly interested and made notes of the matter in what he called 'hisbook'. Count Magnus and Other Ghost Stories.

Ghost Stories of an Antiquary is a horror short story collection by British writer M. R. James, published in 1904 (some had previously appeared in magazines). It was his first short story collection. Canon Alberic's Scrap-Book". Number 13". "Count Magnus". 'Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad''".

More Ghost Stories is a horror short story collection by British writer M. James, published in 1911. It was his second short story collection. The Tractate Middoth". The Stalls of Barchester Cathedral". Mr Humphreys and His Inheritance".

Librivox public domain recording of Ghost Stories of an Antiquary by . Montague Rhodes James (1862-1936) was a medieval scholar; Provost of King's College, Cambridge. He wrote many of his ghost stories to be read aloud in the long tradition of spooky Christmas Eve tales. His stories often use rural settings, with a quiet, scholarly protagonist getting caught up in the activities of supernatural forces. The details of horror are almost never explicit, the stories relying on a gentle, bucolic background to emphasise the awfulness of the otherworldly intrusions.

Most of his stories are based on things that he himself was interested in: old books and manuscripts, ancient .

Most of his stories are based on things that he himself was interested in: old books and manuscripts, ancient houses and medieval history. James was also a talented actor who produced and acted in several plays. He was also a classical scholar and his stories are often full of references to ancient writers and books. If you're in the mood for some spooky stories for a rainy night, Ghost Stories of an Antiquary is certainly the book for you. An English tourist in a small, rural town in the South of France discovers an ancient manuscript with a strange illustration on the last page. A young orphan is sent to live with his elderly cousin, a secretive man who is obsessed with immortality.

Montague Rhodes James wrote many of his ghost stories to be read aloud in the long tradition of spooky Christmas Eve . These short stories are unrelated in plot or character but are all excellent examples of the spooky writing of a hundred years ago, very atmospheric.

Montague Rhodes James wrote many of his ghost stories to be read aloud in the long tradition of spooky Christmas Eve tales. His stories often use rural settings. 4 people found this helpful.

Having terrified generations since its first publication in 1904, Ghost Stories of an Antiquary is a collection that will haunt the reader’s imagination long after the lights have gone out. Impression. One fee. Stacks of books. Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once).

Funny duck
Despite the word "ghost" in the title, M. R. James's short stories are based on supernatural occurrences that are more demonic in nature than ghostly. Ghosts and demons are clearly not the same thing, and may make a difference in the average reader's enjoyment of these seven tales, for with a couple of exceptions, these are not stories of the departed who have return to haunt the living, but rather demonic forces that attack mortals for their own dark purposes.

Each story is told by an anonymous narrator, recounting various stories in a casual, matter-of-fact, chatty tone that adds to the realism of the stories, and (in an odd way) their inherent creepiness. Often he recounts his stories as anecdotes told by his companions, or through edited diary and journal entries, or in one case, the minutes of a court-case. These methods of telling the story add greatly to the effectiveness of the tale considering that the key to any truly scary story is subtlety, and by presenting them in such mundane terms, James captures the steady encroachment of the unknown on ordinary life with chilling effect.

In many horror stories (such as those of Algernon Blackwood) it is randomness that is terrifying, where odd happenings occur outside the "rules" of nature and logic. In comparison, James is slightly more forthcoming about the reasons behind his hauntings, providing some detail on why they happen and what's behind them. The fact that there is a pattern and a reason behind frightening events means that the protagonist (and by proxy, the reader) is slightly more empowered about what's going on, and can take steps to understand and stop the terrifying events. Of course, they don't always succeed.

"A School Story" concerns two men reminiscing about school ghost stories. One mentions his old Latin master, and how he reacted strangely to a particular boy's Latin translations that seem to contain some hidden meaning for him. This is an interesting tale as it is told from the point of view of witnesses to a haunting, not participants, and the teller of the story knows nothing about the background circumstances of the man's troubled past - though there are plenty of clues for the perceptive reader. Very short, but very intriguing, "More Ghost Stories" starts off with my favorite story.

In "The Rose Garden," Mary Anstruther unwisely orders the clearing of a plot of land for her rose garden, including a post fixed firmly into the ground. The gardeners are reluctant to touch the place, and residents of the area have their own tales from when they were children - nightmares that are soon shared by Mrs Anstruther's husband as to a trial that took place long ago.

"The Tractate Middoth" is something of a treasure hunt, in which a librarian is unknowingly swept up in a search for a deceased man's legacy when he is asked to retrieve a book that mysteriously disappears and reappears from the shelves, and which a terrifying specter seems to hold a particular interest in. A plan formed by an eccentric old man leads a nephew and niece on a search for his will - if only they can find the right book in time.

"Casting the Runes" is a story that reads a little bit like a dark old fairytale, in which an innocent man wrongs a figure of evil and as such has to outwit him before his time runs out. After refusing to allow Mr Karswell the chance to lecture on the subject of alchemy, Edward Dunning finds himself the subject of a supernatural attack. Getting into contact with the brother of a previous victim of Karswell, the two men plot to turn the tables on Karswell. Suspenseful and spooky, this is a clear-cut case of good versus evil.

It is an obituary that opens "The Stalls of Barchester Cathedral," concerning the death of Archdeacon John Hayes, after which the narrator works backwards toward the ultimate cause of death: an oak tree. In between these two extremes are the suspicious circumstances in regards to how Hayes came to acquire the position of Archdeacon, a series of his diary entries and letters which become ever-more desperate and filled with the motto of "I must be firm," and a trio of carved wooden statues whose origins like in the satisfying conclusion to the story. This is another one of my favorites; a dark and delicious story of piecing together a supernatural mystery with a spine-tingling revelation at its conclusion.

"Martin's Close" is the aforementioned story that relies on the documented evidence of a court-case to reveal the tale of a "simple-minded" girl's death at the hands of a young lord. Though the telling of it is through the minutes of the court-case, along with dialogue of the witnesses, it still manages to keep a heightened sense of dread and suspense as the facts of the murder become clear.

"Mr Humphreys and his Inheritance" refers to the titular character inheriting his uncle's estate and learning more about it from the locals - particularly in regards to the yew maze that has been locked up for years, and which contains a strange copper globe at its centre. Though not especially frightening, this final tale is an intriguing and thought-provoking story that makes good use of both the charm and menace that mazes can offer an explorer.

Since the author himself lived from 1862 to 1936, the time period in which these stories are set have an authentic ring to them, and though James never strays far from his formula (rather, each story's uniqueness comes from the *way* in which it is told), as patterns go, he has latched onto a satisfying one. Every tale involves a series of spooky occurrences upon which light is eventually shed, but it is in the slow build up of the main character's persecution from demonic forces that James really cranks up the tension and delivers on his ability to scare the reader.

Keep in mind though that this particular compilation of stories may not be the best buy for a collector: I'm sure that there are other anthologies of James's work that contain all of his stories, the purchase of which will avoid doubling-up on certain tales. Browse before you buy.
Nakora
The ghost stories of M.R. James (MRJ) are widely considered to be the best supernatural literature ever written. "More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary" was his second collection of short stories to be published (1911) and includes seven tales of the supernatural.
However, you might want to spend a bit more money and buy the "The Penguin Complete Ghost Stories of M.R. James." If you completely succumb to the refined but potent horror of this author's writings, only "A Pleasing Terror" (Ash Tree Press 2001) will then do. The latter book contains all of MRJ's supernatural literature, including story fragments that were never completed, biographies, bibliographies, commentary, and his fantasy novelette, "The Five Jars."
"More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary" consists of the following stories, plus a brief preface by the author:
"A School Story"--MRJ was a dean at King's College, Cambridge and he supposedly wrote this story to entertain the King's College Choir. I believe it is one of his shortest complete stories and it contains several ideas for further tales of the supernatural which were never followed up by MRJ himself. In this tale two middle-aged men are reminiscing about ghosts at boys' schools, and one relates a story of a schoolboy's revenge on a murderous master.
"The Rose Garden"--Features one of MRJ's less sympathetic female characters. The overbearing Mrs. Anstruther gets her supernatural comeuppance when she insists upon the removal of an old oak post in the rose garden.
"The Tractate Middoth"--The young Mr. Garrett is asked to find a copy of the "Tractate Middoth" in a "certain famous library" and stumbles upon a cobwebby mystery. Find yourself a quiet, unpopulated corner in the stacks of an old library and see if you can read this story without looking behind you. This is MRJ at his antiquarian best.
"Casting the Runes"--One of MRJ's most collected stories along with "Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad." The villain of tale is sometimes assumed to be based on the self-styled 'Great Beast,' occultist Aleister Crowley. He and MRJ might have crossed paths at Cambridge University although there seems to be no proof that the scholarly Dean ever met the so-called 'wickedest man in the world.' At any rate, this is a tale of a man who unwittingly angers a sorcerer.
"The Stalls of Barchester Cathedral"--This story begins with the obituary of the Venerable John Benwell Haynes, Archdeacon of Sowerbridge and Rector of Pickhill and Candley. He succeeded to his position upon the rather mysterious demise of Archdeacon Pulteney in 1810, but does not find much enjoyment in his new job. In fact, the archideacon's stall with its carvings of a cat, the King of Hell, and Death becomes a particularly haunting spot for the new prelate.
"Martin's Close"--The bit of land referred to in the story's title is "one of the smallest enclosures you are likely to see." It consists of a pond that is hedged all around with no gate or entrance. The tale of its haunting is told primarily through a court record from the time of Lord Chief Justice Jeffreys, he of the infamous 'Bloody Assize' that followed the Monmouth Rebellion. In spite of this rather awkward structure, it is a very frightening tale of supernatural revenge.
"Mr Humphreys and His Inheritance"--Once installed as the new master of his deceased uncle's estate, Mr. Humphreys discovers the plan to an overgrown maze on his property. He decides to investigate the old landscaping feature, which was erected by one of his most notorious ancestors. Mr. Humphreys also discovers a set of stone blocks that were once part of the maze. He reconstructs the inscription on them to read: "Penetrans Ad Interior Mortis."
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