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Barchester Towers (The Complete Novels of Anthony Trollope) ePub download

by Anthony Trollope,Ruth Rendell

  • Author: Anthony Trollope,Ruth Rendell
  • ISBN: 1870587464
  • ISBN13: 978-1870587464
  • ePub: 1983 kb | FB2: 1492 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Ashgate Publishing / Trollope Society (March 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 476
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 625
  • Format: mbr mobi docx lrf
Barchester Towers (The Complete Novels of Anthony Trollope) ePub download

Anthony Trollope (/ˈtrɒləp/; 24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary coun.

Anthony Trollope (/ˈtrɒləp/; 24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote novels on political, social, and gender issues, and other topical matters. Trollope's literary reputation dipped somewhat during the last years of his life, but he had regained the esteem of critics by the mid-20th century.

Sir Anthony Trollope was one of the most successful and highly respected . Published in 1857, Barchester Towers was followed by four other novels in Anthony Trollope's Barsetshire Series.

Sir Anthony Trollope was one of the most successful and highly respected writers of the Victorian era. Though born in a socially privileged family, Trollope's father was financially unsuccessful, but insisted on his children being brought up in the aristocratic wa. When the beloved former bishop suddenly dies, a complete outsider is brought in to take his place. Instead of the bishop's son, Archdeacon Grantly, whom the entire parish was expecting, a more low-church minister, Bishop Proudie is given the post.

Barchester Towers, published in 1857 by Anthony Trollope, is the second novel in his series known as the "Chronicles of Barsetshire". Among other things it satirises the antipathy in the Church of England between High Church and Evangelical adherents. Trollope began writing this book in 1855. He wrote constantly and made himself a writing-desk so he could continue writing while travelling by train.

Showing 30 distinct works. previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9. Barchester Towers (Chronicles of Barsetshire by. Anthony Trollope.

Anthony Trollope Barchester Towers. In the great cathedral cities of England, the church and politics go hand in hand

Anthony Trollope Barchester Towers. In the great cathedral cities of England, the church and politics go hand in hand. The government appoints the bishop, who is the head of the church in that city, and below him come archdeacons, deans, vicars, parsons, chaplains – all kinds of clergymen, of differing degrees of rank, importance, influence, and income

eer with his back to the sea-coal fire, and his hands in his breeches pockets-how his fine eye was lit up with anger, and his forehead gleamed with patriotism-how he stamped his foot as he thought of his heavy associates-how he all but swore as he remembered how much too clever one of. them had been-my creative readers may imagine. But was he so engaged? No: history and truth compel me to deny it. He was sitting easily in a lounging chair, conning over a Newmarket list, and by his elbow on the table was lying open an uncut French novel on which he was engaged.

LibriVox recording of Barchester Towers, by Anthony Trollope. This is the second in Trollope’s ‘Barsetshire’ series of novels

LibriVox recording of Barchester Towers, by Anthony Trollope. This is the second in Trollope’s ‘Barsetshire’ series of novels  . We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff.

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This novel is published under the auspices of the Trollope Society.
Konetav
After reading "The Warden" (the precursor to "Barchester Towers") and the 800-page "The Way We Live Now" last year, I thought I might have overdosed on Trollope. But within a few chapters, I was hooked on this story of a little English parish and the small, yet significant, dramas of its inhabitants. Trollope is a master at poking fun at people's vanities. Much of the novel's plot centers around misunderstandings that could be easily resolved, if only the characters would be honest with one another -- but, of course, their pride prevents them. When the minor clerics are awaiting the death of the old dean of the cathedral, while secretly calculating their chances of getting his job, I was reminded of my own hypocrisies. And the failed, fumbled proposals by the suitors of Eleanor Bold are hilarious. Trollope's sly direct address of the reader adds a level of intimacy that makes you feel completely invested in his funny, complex, vivid world.
Garr
I am an enthusiastic fan of Trollope and his excellence with character description. As other reviewers mention, his comic side was in evidence with this book. How can I ever forget the Reverend Obadiah Slop who added the "e" to his name for the sake of euphony. One of the characters we truly love to hate and hope he receives his comeuppance.

The "elderly" Miss Thorne was a delight as were the happy-go-lucky Bertie Stanhope and his sister the delicious Signora Neroni. Trollope definitely nailed the infatuation some parents display in regard to their offspring.

My primary reason for a four-star rating deals with the sometimes too long focus on other unpleasant characters such as the domineering Mrs. Proudie, the pompous Archdeacon Grantly, and the way-too-often mention of the 14 young Quiverfuls. (Even though it was the way of Victorian ladies, at times I wanted to shake Eleanor.)

To my way of thinking, the reader is beautifully treated to the warring factions within the ecclesiastical realm in addition to in-depth exposure to the power behind the throne. I look forward to completing the series.
Jeronashe
Where Dickens paints memorable characters with wonderful names, Trollope draws characters closer to ourselves then shows us how they think, behave, and interact.

Another difference between characters in Dickens and in Trollope is that Trollope's are more nuanced. The detestable Mrs. Proudie repels us with her prudish haughtiness but when she upholds the cause of Mrs. Quiverful she does so as much out of charity as out of principle. The odious Obadiah Slope suffers pangs of love that made me want to shake him by the collar and tell him to wake up! The good Mr. Harding is clearly in the wrong in thinking ill of his daughter Eleanor's judgment, and yet Eleanor was also at fault in thinking herself above defense. There are no white hats or black hats in Barchester, only various shades of gray.

Trollope delights in describing what all these people think, and how they express themselves. How the tone of voice is intended to undo the work of the words spoken. How truth can be spun into a spider's web as does the wonderful character of the Signora Madeline Neroni. If anyone in the novel can be called evil it is her. She manipulates people like objects for her own amusement; she's like a cat playing with a mouse which it has no intention to eat. And yet even the reader can't help falling in love with la Signora. And yet, and yet, and yet... No one is simple in Trollope's world.

Barchester Towers differs from its predecessor in the Chronicles of Barsetshire. The Warden is a classic romance tainted with a touch of tragedy all brought down to the scale of everyday life. Barchester Towers on the other hand is a sprawling pageant of people, a long chapter in a comédie humaine that follows Balzac's tradition.

Vincent Poirier, Tokyo
Adrielmeena
This, the second in a series of six, is the most popular in the Barchester series. It is considered a world classic and this volume(and the other 5 volumes that I own) are in the Oxford University Press in a series entlited World's Classics. All the volumes are beautiful examples of bookmaking and a joy to read. This volume carries forward the main characters from the first volume in the series and introduces several more important characters. All these characters illistrate the England of the 1860s and gives us a real chance to compare the feelings they have to the feelings we have to America of 2013. their world was very different from our world, but exactly the same.. I recommend this book highly and the entire series-you will enjoy them greatly.
Zeks Horde
I decided to read this as a piece of nostalgia because I'd never tackled Trollope before. It's really quite cleverly constructed and in the end the villain gets his comeuppance and everyone lives happily ever after. The background of scenery and social life is fascinating as a piece of history, especially in relation to the power of the church at the time, and the rigidity of the social structure. The language is ponderous and elaborate but that's just part of the age and worth tolerating for the sake of a nice story. Give it a try.
Yozshujinn
The sequel to THE WARDEN is a delightful reminder that human nature changes little. The characters could as easily be plotted in a current novel-albeit with the addition of electronic devices-as this mid-1800's novel. What a pleasant time I had reading a story filled with wit and written in fine literary style! It reminds me how drastically the English language has been boiled down, thereby removing the rich nuance made possible in storytelling with the use of an extensive vocabulary. If you haven't discovered Anthony Trollope, this series is a great place to start-at least as satisfying as watching a marathon of DOWNTOWN ABBEY episodes!
Goldendragon
The novel was a bit too long. My not knowing much, if anything, about the Church of England, there were times I was confused. However, the characters are what saved this novel. Very distinctly created and most memorable. Worth the read. This was only my second Trollope work. There will be more.
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