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Wolf Pack: The American Submarine Strategy That Helped Defeat Japan ePub download

by Steven Trent Smith

  • Author: Steven Trent Smith
  • ISBN: 0471223549
  • ISBN13: 978-0471223542
  • ePub: 1309 kb | FB2: 1965 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (July 18, 2003)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 990
  • Format: mbr docx mobi txt
Wolf Pack: The American Submarine Strategy That Helped Defeat Japan ePub download

Steven Trent Smith, in his book Wolf Pack, has tried to tell the tale of Admiral Charles Lockwood and his desire to utilize group tactics to hunt Japanese shipping during the Second World War. Unfortunately, the book reads more like a disjointed tale of multiple patrols than an explanation o. .

Steven Trent Smith, in his book Wolf Pack, has tried to tell the tale of Admiral Charles Lockwood and his desire to utilize group tactics to hunt Japanese shipping during the Second World War. Unfortunately, the book reads more like a disjointed tale of multiple patrols than an explanation of how the US Navy implemented the wolf pack doctrine and utilized it to prove victorious in the battle of the Pacific.

Wolf Pack traces the development of one of the most effective naval strategies employed by the American fleet in World War II. Steven Trent Smith recounts the behind-the-scenes struggles of the visionary . naval commanders who sought to adapt the highly effective strategy of using coordinated submarine attack groups, or ?wolf-packs, ? first pioneered by the German Navy Wolf Pack traces the development of one of the most effective naval strategies employed by the American fleet in World War II.

This is a fascinating story well told. Elizabeth Norman, author of We Band of Angel. The story of the escape and rescue of those American expatriates is a testament to the courage and strength of civilians caught in the war at its start. Naval Institute Proceeding.

Steven Trent Smith recounts the behind-the-scenes struggles of the visionary . To ensure we are able to help you as best we can, please include your reference number: ZNYKVV4RP2. naval commanders who sought to adapt the highly effective strategy of using coordinated submarine attack groups, or "wolf-packs," first pioneered by the German Navy to devastating effect. Smith provides vivid profiles of the major players involved and clearly explains the important technology involved.

Steven Trent Smith recounts th.Wolf Pack traces the development of one of the most effective naval strategies employed by the American fleet in World War II. naval commanders who sought to adapt the highly effective strategy of using coordinated submarine attack groups, or ?wolf-packs, ? first pioneered by the German Navy to devastating effect.

Two years after the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese fleet was the superior navy - until a visionary admiral was able to implement the same strategy in the Pacific that the Germans had executed to such devastating effect. In WOLFPACK: The American Submarine Strategy That Helped Defeat Japan, historian Steven Trent Smith re-creates this critical, yet n history of American Naval bravery in the South Pacific.

By Steven Trent Smith. Steven Trent Smith of Philadelphia, P. is the author of the critically acclaimed book, The Rescue: A True Story of Courage and Survival in World War II. naval commanders who sought to adapt the highly effective strategy of using coordinated submarine attack groups, or wolf-packs, first pioneered by the German Navy to devastating effect. A five-time Emmy award-winning freelance TV photojournalist with a passion for history.

Wolf Pack The American Submarine Strategy That Helped Defeat Japan Smith, Steven Trent. This helped the Norwegian King and government to first escape the city and then eventually reach England. Wolfpacks at War Showell, Jak Mallmann. This was exactly what the Germans wanted desperately to avoid and was to cost them dearly. In Oslo fjord the German invasion fleet was hit the hardest - even though they knew how the defences were laid out for the most part.

by Smith, Steven Trent. In early June 1945, nine American submarines slipped beneath the waves of the Tsuchima Strait, picked their way through a dense minefield using state-of-the-art sonar, and entered the Sea of Japan, Emperor Hirohito's "private pond. Over the next few weeks, these relentless hunters would decimate what remained of the Japanese merchant fleet, already driven to near extinction by coordinated submarine attack groups. It was the culmination of one of World War II's most successful naval strategies - the wolf pack.

The American Submarine Strategy That Helped Defeat Japan. by Steven Trent Smith. Published July 18, 2003 by Wiley. making his way to the sub's Spartan bridge he bellowed, Stand by to get under wa. " At the command, his crew scurried to their stations.

Wolf Pack traces the development of one of the most effective naval strategies employed by the American fleet in World War II. Steven Trent Smith recounts the behind-the-scenes struggles of the visionary U.S. naval commanders who sought to adapt the highly effective strategy of using coordinated submarine attack groups, or ?wolf-packs,? first pioneered by the German Navy to devastating effect. Smith provides vivid profiles of the major players involved and clearly explains the important technology involved. Working from survivor accounts and government documents, he recounts, in scenes packed with nail-biting undersea action, some of the most hair-raising wolf pack operations in both the European and Asian theatres of war.
Kajishakar
A valuable addition to anyone's naval library. Information gleaned from much research by the author. Details of each pack's patrol never seen before. Also of interest were the many trials and tribulations that Admiral Lockwood faced in getting the proper equipment for his submarines. The FM Sonar (Hell's Bells) enabled the subs to get into Japan's backyard (Sea of Japan) for the first time. The first wolf pack there sank some 28 ships and were only able to get into the Sea by using the untested in combat, FM Sonar.
Other details were uncovered by the author such as the Navy's use of a grid system in numbering the areas of the Pacific and the publication of a doctrine for submarine commanders which was a document similar to the German "The U-Boat Commander's Handbook."
The terror felt by crew members when undergoing an attack or transversing a minefield was well described by the author as was the real comradship only felt by elite units of the military in times of danger. Humor was added as well to make the book real as were many direct quotes from commanding officers and Admiral Lockwood.
A sure bet and a must have for all historians.
Agalas
After listening to returning ww2 submariners and relating their stories to the book i found that the book filled in certain secret ww2 tatcis & equipment that are just now being released to the public !!
Cesar
Steven Trent Smith, in his book Wolf Pack, has tried to tell the tale of Admiral Charles Lockwood and his desire to utilize group tactics to hunt Japanese shipping during the Second World War.

Unfortunately, the book reads more like a disjointed tale of multiple patrols than an explanation of how the US Navy implemented the wolf pack doctrine and utilized it to prove victorious in the battle of the Pacific.

Smith provides us with many exciting tales of different submarines sinking merchant vessels, or of their attacks upon Japanese military ships or even registered hospital ships (though these were being used as military transports rather than floating hospitals when they were attacked). The stories are compelling and very enjoyable, but they just don't help the reader to understand how the wolf pack doctrine came to be.

It is only in the last 100 pages of the book that we start to see tales of wolf packs being successful - prior to this, the stories of group attacks are fraught with peril and failure. Once the wolf packs entered the Sea of Japan, we see tremendous success - however, the question that is not answered conclusively in this book is whether that success was due to the employment of wolf packs or because of the tremendous surprise that was achieved by the Americans.

If one is looking for a rousing good tale of submarine warfare in the Pacific during WWII, this book will provide the requisite entertainment. It will also teach the reader a lot about a number of different subs tha patrolled the waters of the Pacific during 1941-1945. However, if one is looking for a true explanation of wolf pack doctrine and how it was successfully employed, he/she will have to look further than this.
IWantYou
This book begins--one might instead says 'gets off on the wrong foot'--with an odd title. 'Wolf Pack' is, after all, a term associated in military history and the popular imagination with the dread Nazi submarine formations of the same war but a different ocean. It's as odd as if today we called the high-speed assault on Iraq as a blitzkrieg.
Be that as it may, 'wolf pack' is the right term: That's what American submariners aimed at creating in World War II (they were well aware of the effective U-boat tactics used in the Atlantic). Author Steven Trent Smith does a good job of explaining how the Navy's Pacific submarine chief, Adm. Charles Lockwood, and others worked to adapt German tactics for use against the Japanese (they started on the checkerboard dance floor of the officers' club). It wasn't easy. For one thing, communications between submarines was unreliable for a long time; another problem was that American sub skippers were used to being 'lone wolves' and didn't want to change.
Another problem--in the book as well as the war--is the need to develop 'pro-submarine' equipment, which slows the narrative down. Lockwood wanted improved torpedos (ours were lousy early in the war) but he also sought important devices that would help subs defend themselves. One of them was submarine sonar to help them penetrate minefields. The reader has to be a little patient here because the climax of the book involves infiltrating two wolf packs through minefields guarding the Sea of Japan--the huge Inland Sea between Japan and the Asian mainland.
Smith makes clear that sub skippers on both sides sought naval targets and considered merchant ships low class. Eventually the Americans realized that merchantment were the way to go--there were so many more of them and Japan, and island nation, was dependent on shipping. (The Japanese mostly stuck with naval targets, even though America's many Pacific bases were also islands, also fed by sea.)
As a writer smith is workmanlike at best; he did better in his previous book, "The Rescue," about Americans hiding in the Philippines from the beginning of the war until rescued by submarine some years later). He's sometimes a little weak on details; I noted a couple of muffed details. Some editing or copy-editing might have helped; publisher please note.
His biggest problem is the need to explain so many technical details. This is not a simple subject, and so you don't get here the slam-bang action of Cmdr. Edward L. Beach's famous "Run Silent, Run Deep." But Smith does get his licks in at least twice. And is doing so almost rises to 4 tars.
His description of the sub Parche's all-out cowboy assault on a convoy in July of 1944 is delightfully hair-raising, and it brings the book to life just in time. He also develops sweaty-palms tension when two wolf packs do at last penetrate Sea of Japan. Knowing something about mines will help, because Hollywood has taught you all wrong. They NOT big round cannisters of TNT bobbing free on the surface.
Mines float but they float below the surface, where they can't be seen. They are tethered by long cables to anchors on the sea bottom. Lockwood's packs had two choices. They could make a mad, high-speed surface dash, escaping the mines but risking surface attack, or they could snake through the minefields, using their new (and not battle-tested) sonar to locate the mines, and all their skill to steer their 300-foot subs safely between them.
Here Smith screws up the tension. The first time he puts you in a sub that come so close it grazes a mine's cable--and that awful grating, scraping sound inches its horrible way the whole length of the hull at a walking pace of two knots--well, check your palms. They'll be wet.--By Bill Marsano, a long-time devotee of WWII nonfiction books.
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