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After Birth ePub download

by Elisa Albert

  • Author: Elisa Albert
  • ISBN: 0544273737
  • ISBN13: 978-0544273733
  • ePub: 1144 kb | FB2: 1888 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First Printing edition (February 17, 2015)
  • Pages: 208
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 391
  • Format: lrf docx lit doc
After Birth ePub download

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A widely acclaimed young writer’s fierce novel, in which childbirth and new motherhood are as high stakes a proving ground as any combat zone A year has passed since Ari gave birth to Walker.

With piercing insight, purifying anger, and outrageous humor, Elisa Albert issues a wake-up call to a culture that turns its new mothers into exiles, and expects them to act like natives. Like Lionel Shriver’s We Need to Talk About Kevin and Anne Enright’s The Gathering, this is a daring and resonant novel from one of our most visceral writers.

After Birth by Elisa Albert A new mother is trying to find a balance, the new child and family. Elisa Albert is the author of The Book of Dahlia and How This Night is Different - but this novel is her UK debut. Story of a woman who's not found her zen after giving birth Читать весь отзыв. She grew up in Los Angeles and now lives in upstate New York with her family.

We used to microwave your formula. I sighed, closed my eyes, hoped she might not be there when I opened them again. What? We didn’t know. It fills them up better! He’ll sleep longer my God, you know what else we u. . It fills them up better! He’ll sleep longer my God, you know what else we used to do? Benadryl. What a gift that was. Knocked you out for hours. She giggled and glanced around at the chaotic mess: was the basket full of clean laundry, or was it dirty? The bowl in which I’d eaten that morning’s oatmeal, getting crusty. Dirty dishes stacked in the sink.

Read online books written by Elisa Albert in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of After Birth at ReadAnyBook.

After Birth cuts open the body of literature on mothering, birth, feminism, female friendship, female . Albert’s novel poses that question as a shriek of a carnival ride inside a spinning antigravity chamber, the ultimate trippy trip.

After Birth cuts open the body of literature on mothering, birth, feminism, female friendship, female hateship - whether academic treatise or poem or novel - and wrenches out something so new we barely recognize it. Wet, red, slimy, alive: a truth baby. It’s an underground punk show, a zine of irreverent ­how-to-be-a-mother ­koans, an app for dealing with the ­imaginary voice of an abusive, long-dead mother. It’s obscene, reckless, vicious, hilarious and above all real.

With After Birth, Elisa Albert has proven herself to be not only one of our most important novelists, but one of our most honest feminists. After Birth is dangerous, gripping, and essential-The Bell Jar of our time.

Join Elisa Albert and a coterie of other phenomenal women writers (like Anya Ulinich and Chloe Caldwell) for the launch of.

Join Elisa Albert and a coterie of other phenomenal women writers (like Anya Ulinich and Chloe Caldwell) for the launch of her brilliant new novel. Filled with all the humor and terror of parenting and love, After Birth tells the story of Ari as, a year after her son's birth, she continues to navigate the strange isolation of motherhood.

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A widely acclaimed young writer’s fierce novel, in which childbirth and new motherhood are as high stakes a proving ground as any combat zone

A year has passed since Ari gave birth to Walker, though it went so badly awry she has trouble calling it “birth” and still she can't locate herself in her altered universe. Amid the strange, disjointed rhythms of her days and nights and another impending winter in upstate New York, Ari is a tree without roots, struggling to keep her branches aloft.

When Mina, a one-time cult musician — older, self-contained, alone, and nine-months pregnant —moves to town, Ari sees the possibility of a new friend, despite her unfortunate habit of generally mistrusting women. Soon they become comrades-in-arms, and the previously hostile terrain seems almost navigable.

With piercing insight, purifying anger, and outrageous humor, Elisa Albert issues a wake-up call to a culture that turns its new mothers into exiles, and expects them to act like natives. Like Lionel Shriver’s We Need to Talk About Kevin and Anne Enright’s The Gathering, this is a daring and resonant novel from one of our most visceral writers.

Global Progression
This book blew me away. Fearless, smart, and so real. Best book I have read about those first months after motherhood (so often romanticized -- but a surprise horror show for many) -- post partum depression/anxiety from the inside. Loved it.
Wrathmaster
Unlike other reviewers, I am wholly convinced that Ari (Elisa?) is a great mother. Acknowledging motherhood is hard is not a flaw in my book. It's the two-sided medal of motherhood that is mercilessly described here, both fierce love and relentlessness. The alienating, isolating, shoot-me-in-the-head part of it in the early days no one tells you about.
What is worse in Ari's case is she can't get over her c-section, and she is not close physically or figuratively to any friends, so she goes through the experience alone.
So, the book reads half coming of age (or should we say coming into motherhood?) novel, part ranting against society, herself... with a very fierce stance pro-breastfeeding (yay Ari!) but translating also into a very pointed attack against mothers who don't breastfeed (not so yay Ari!) Boy, was I glad to sit on the good side of the fence when I read that diatribe.
I was perplexed by the end. It doesn't "wrap up" nicely. It's pretty open ended. It's strange to me that her friendship with her neighbour, the focus point of the book from a narrative point, just fades away and Ari doesn't talk about it anymore. Seems to me the novel would have had more weight and structure by being organised around that part. But what do I know.
If people liked this novel, they might really enjoy Rachel's Cusk "On becoming a mother" too. It's written in a more falsely detached way (not as raw) but with the same despair and humour about the trials of having a baby.
INvait
Great!
White gold
Fiction that tells a little bit of every woman's struggle to be oneself with the new role of mother. The main character speaks of suicide, but not in the intentional sense, more like a way to confirm that the individual has power still despite the ravages of a botched C-section and a bad birth experience. I found her grim musings hilarious and wish I had owned this book when I was a new mom because I would have felt less crazy. Bitter, yes, but in the cynically funny sense while speaking honestly of how women can be terrible at supporting each other.
Arlelond
A funny, dark, tender, caustic, and honest, oh so honest, account of new motherhood. Perfectly captures the no one told me it would be like this state of shock first time mothers often experience. Mothering is hard and lonely, full of love for your child and a sense of loss for who you were before. Elisa Albert's novel nails that and so much more. I wish I'd had this book with my first child. Give it to anyone you know who is expecting.

Caveat: while I don't normally comment on reviews of others, the one starred reviews here are largely written by people who did not finish the book because they are offended by "f words." So if swearing bugs you, don't read this book. Sorry, but it irks me when readers give negative reviews on a book they haven't read in its entirety.
Mora
really amazing book. I couldn't put it down.
superstar
Is it common for female fiction writers these days to be so flippant, crass...and feminist at the same time? Are there other authors like this that I should know about?

This is a very modern book about the transformation and trauma of new motherhood.

I found parts of the larger storyline to be not so realistic, like the fact that the main character is so obsessed with becoming friends with a woman rock star who moves to town. On the other hand, so many of the smaller details were extremely well-written and enjoyable to read. For example on page 10 where she tells her story of finding a husband: "I was with a series of angry f***ers up til Paul, real flip-you-over-try-to-hurt-you-types, not a lot of eye contact. Thought I was having fun."

As a doula for two decades, I've been aware of the fact that mothers are as isolated today as when my mother was having babies in the 1960s. But only recently (probably when I became a mother myself) do I feel that I've fully grasped how deep a problem this is. The author published this book at age 36, which means she probably wrote it in her early 30s. I'm older than her so I really admire her mature and laser-sharp critique of the way our culture isolates mothers.

On page 14 she says: "Who can say I'm not a good mother? Who can say I don't read the subject headings in the books? The How to Care for Your Child if There Is Absolutely No One with Any Primal Knowledge Around to Guide You guides. What to Expect When There is No Received Wisdom Whatsoever."

She captures how even health care providers and friends often have no idea that postpartum depression has taken hold.

The main character is from a privileged background, and I love reading insightful reflections by people on their race and class background, whether they're disadvantage or privileged. The author pretty much failed here, I thought. She seems like a brat when she's discussing class issues, and I really had to put aside how irritating she was in order to read through those (small) sections of the book.

Toward the end there was a section of about 3 pages, I think, in which the narrator discusses how her grandmother survived the Holocaust. That was shocking and perhaps it was a matter of importance, but it seemed to come out of nowhere and I didn't know why it was included in the book or whether it should've been there. The author doesn't shy away from shock value in general, I guess.

She nails so much of new motherhood, as well as womanhood. Subtle harassment for breastfeeding. Birth trauma. The difference between good breastfeeding advice and bad advice. Figuring out all the shades of sexual orientation. Breastfeeding and sexuality. The small ways we help each other survive postpartum.

Glad I read it.
If you've ever felt the slightest pangs of postpartum depression, and if you identify as a feminist, you'll love this angry rant about the emotional, social, and physical challenges of the first year. This is not an anti-motherhood book: Ari, the narrator, adores her child and worries all the time about her inadequacies as a mother. Instead, it acknowledges the incredible challenge of re-organizing your world around a new life, and the terrible isolation that can go with it when you don't have other mothers as companions and mentors.
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