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Shalimar the Clown: A Novel ePub download

by Salman Rushdie

  • Author: Salman Rushdie
  • ISBN: 0679783482
  • ISBN13: 978-0679783480
  • ePub: 1957 kb | FB2: 1868 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks (October 10, 2006)
  • Pages: 416
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 476
  • Format: lrf txt docx lrf
Shalimar the Clown: A Novel ePub download

Also by Salman Rushdie. In loving memory of my Kashmiri grandparents. Step Across This Line: Collected Nonfiction 1992-2002.

Also by Salman Rushdie. Dr. Ataullah and Amir un nissa Butt. I am being rowed through Paradise on a river of Hell: Exquisite ghost, it is night. The paddle is a heart; it breaks the porcelain waves. I’m everything you lost. The Ground Beneath Her Feet. The Moor's Last Sigh. Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991.

Selected by Salman Rushdie and Elizabeth West, these novel excerpts, stories, and memoirs illuminate wonderful writing by authors often overlooked in the West.

An epic narrative that moves from California to Kashmir, France, and England, and back to California again. Selected by Salman Rushdie and Elizabeth West, these novel excerpts, stories, and memoirs illuminate wonderful writing by authors often overlooked in the West. Thirty-two selections by Indian authors writing in English over the past half-century.

In Shalimar the Clown, he has written a vast, richly peopled, beautiful and deeply rageful book that serves as a profound and disturbing artifact of our times. San Francisco Chronicle.

Ships from and sold by books4you88. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). In Shalimar the Clown, he has written a vast, richly peopled, beautiful and deeply rageful book that serves as a profound and disturbing artifact of our times. Shalimar the Clown should rank as Rushdie’s most affecting and most effective novel in years.

Shalimar the Clown book. Amidst all of this, I do think the novel maintains a certainly apolitical space. the guy is also writing about love and vengeance. There's so much to say about the emotional, human side of these characters, about the way people grow and change in the book.

In 1993 Midnight's Children was judged to be the 'Booker of Bookers', the best novel to have won the Booker Prize in its first 25 years.

Shalimar the Clown is a 2005 novel by Salman Rushdie. The novel took Rushdie four years to write, and was initially published on 6 September 2005 by Jonathan Cape. Shalimar the Clown derives its name from Shalimar Gardens, in the vicinity of Srinagar. Srinagar is one of several Mughal Gardens, which were laid out in several parts of undivided India when Mughal invaders ruled over some regions of the subcontinent. Shalimar is also the name of one of the characters featured in the novel

Salman Rushdie misses out the appeal of the ordinary in his continent-crossing new novel, Shalimar the Clown .

Salman Rushdie misses out the appeal of the ordinary in his continent-crossing new novel, Shalimar the Clown, says Natasha Walter. The status of Salman Rushdie as a writer has hardly waned, despite the disappointments of his last two novels, and his status as a totemic figure for those who support freedom of expression in an increasingly divided world will never wane. This novel has been billed as his response to the threat of fundamentalism; it is hard to imagine a more imposing subject. But from the beginning the prose seems to be straining to live up to expectations, and slipping into hyperbole as a result.

Salman Rushdie's second novel, Midnight's Children, was awarded both the Booker Prize and the "Booker of Bookers," as the best novel to have won the Booker Prize in its first 25 years. His other accolades include the Whitbread Novel Award, the Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Austrian State Prize for European Literature. Salman Rushdie lives in London and New York. To schedule a speaking engagement, please contact American Program Bureau at ww. pbspeakers.

Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie FRSL (born 19 June 1947) is a British Indian novelist and essayist. His second novel, Midnight's Children (1981), won the Booker Prize in 1981 and was deemed to be "the best novel of all winners" on two separate occasions, marking the 25th and the 40th anniversary of the prize. Much of his fiction is set on the Indian subcontinent.

“Dazzling . . . Modern thriller, Ramayan epic, courtroom drama, slapstick comedy, wartime adventure, political satire, village legend–they’re all blended here magnificently.”–The Washington Post Book WorldThis is the story of Maximilian Ophuls, America’s counterterrorism chief, one of the makers of the modern world; his Kashmiri Muslim driver and subsequent killer, a mysterious figure who calls himself Shalimar the clown; Max’s illegitimate daughter India; and a woman who links them, whose revelation finally explains them all. It is an epic narrative that moves from California to Kashmir, France, and England, and back to California again. Along the way there are tales of princesses lured from their homes by demons, legends of kings forced to defend their kingdoms against evil. And there is always love, gained and lost, uncommonly beautiful and mortally dangerous.“A commanding story . . . [a] harrowing climax . . . Revenge is an ancient and powerful engine of narrative.”–The New York Times Book Review“Absorbing . . . Everywhere [Rushdie] takes us there is both love and war, in strange and terrifying combinations, painted in swaying, swirling, world-eating prose that annihilates the borders between East and West, love and hate, private lives and the history they make.” –Time“A vast, richly peopled, beautiful and deeply rageful book that serves as a profound and disturbing artifact of our times.”–San Francisco Chronicle“Marvelous . . . brilliant . . . a story worthy of [Rushdie’s] genius.”–Detroit Free PressONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR– The Washington Post Book World –Los Angeles Times Book Review –St. Louis Post-Dispatch –Rocky Mountain NewsONE OF THE BEST NOVELS OF THE YEAR–Time –Chicago Tribune –The Christian Science Monitor
Lahorns Gods
I can think of no one writing today with as vivid an imagination, such compelling story-telling skills and such an amazing ability to weave incredible fictional characters into world history as Salman Rushdie. Shalimar is slow in spots, and I was let down by the ending, but much of it was a magical carpet ride through the rise and terrible fall of Kashmir that thoroughly impressed me. I still prefer Midnight's Children, a breathtaking piece of fiction, but Shalimar the Clown is pretty darn good.
Bodwyn
Mr Rushdie is a supreme novelist, and this is a dense but highly enjoyable novel. The author tells the story unconventionally and does not follow a straight narrative arc; rather, he circles back and forth to the key events. He uses the novel as a means to describe a great deal of brutal historic events, mainly those that have devastated the contested land of Kashmir. At times, you wonder whether those historic events serve the story and the characters, or whether the story serves the author's interest in describing those key and cruel events.Mr Rushdie is very conventional in the tradition of the great 19th century novelists; he seems to be the omniscient and highy opinionated narrator of it all. A very good book which will tells much about the cruel history of Kashmir. BUT, if you want to start with one novel by this excellent author, his supreme work is and always will be Midnight's Children.
KiddenDan
If you're familiar with Salman Rusdhie's works you should read this one. It is a colorful narrative tale about a group of individuals involved directly or indirectly in the India Pakistan conflict over Kashmir. As usual Rushdie weaves the tale through the perspective of various characters all of whom have marvelously intricate personas. It reminded me a bit of the movie Syriana (which is based on an ex-CIA operative's memoir) in that it plausibly explains a like-able character's entry into a terrorist organization. Rushdie also posits another example of religion (though this could be any extreme dichotomy of ideas) dividing a community because of disparate treatment by outsiders. Without spoiling too much, I think the book will both intrigue you and keep you on edge.
Fountain_tenderness
Shalimar the clown is basically a story of two villages in disputed Indian Kashmir, one Hindu and one Muslim, and the lives of their people as first pastoral happiness, then bitter civil war, then terrorism and eye-for-an-eye retribution and bitter revenge devastate life as it was known. In the center is a young couple, Boonyi and Shalimar, who fall in love; and the breaking of their bond and life together is mirrored by the complete breakdown of all that is decent and good around them.

The book starts slow, and Rushdie's writing style, while perhaps well chosen for the locations and people he is here portraying - definitely otherworldly and a deft mixing of narrative and legend - unfortunately does not help it take off. Characters are introduced which may well be colorful but which may be hard to relate to; there is a lot on village history, kings and princes and times and events of long ago which do not seem to add significantly to the progression of the story.

And then things pick up. One selfish act takes place - and everything changes. We are reintroduced to the world: names are discarded, changed, picked anew, fresh with meaning; identities, titles and roles are altered; all that was stable is now unstable, fact and legend are now intertwined, the known world is violated, dishonored, destroyed, set ablaze and a newer and much much uglier one takes its place. Nobody is who they were, all names are lies, honor and personal values are reduced to murder, not only for Shalimar, but for old Misri, for the General, ultimately even for Kashmira. "No more mister nice guy," says the commander of Abu Sayyaf late in the book, and he means it. The gloves are off, no punches are pulled; the story relentlessly becomes more serious and violent. It's not pretty.

The characters are all richly imagined, expertly drawn, and each evolves, impacted by the world around them - and therefore typically for the worse. Especially the degeneration of Shalimar from a seemingly innocent and dumb but loveable man-boy to a driven homocidal maniac is superbly executed; no doubt Rushdie has had quite some time to work on putting such a character on the page. Rushdie can write with humor, sarcasm, sensitivity and sometimes very movingly; his occasional lapses into technique trickery can therefore leave one a little annoyed. But Rushdie is a writer of exceptional talent, just sometimes a little unevenly applied.

It is a tragic, tragic tale - all the more important that people should also realize that it may as well be the truth.
Pameala
Having enjoyed Satanic Verses and The Moors Last Sigh, I looked forward to another odyssey from Rushdie and was not disappointed. As is typical, he challenges our assumptions about people, culture, and social norms. I appreciated his portraits of Kashmir and the difficulty of blended culture between Islam and others.
The "real" story tells about all of our status as fallen from grace and undeserving of forgiveness.
Enila
I have no idea what this book is about. Maybe I’m too concrete but there was nothing that grabbed me in the beginning chapters. Could barely decipher characters or even a plot. What is the mystery? Too much background that is close to impossible to follow to get to anything that grabs me.
Shakagul
What a refreshing piece of literature! Salman Rushdie infuses his rich, sensory, often magical descriptions and style into a wonderful storyline that ties together many people, beliefs, and many worlds.

That's not to say he gives ample and fair treatment to each (nor does he need too)...although the characters whose beliefs he clearly despises are the least defined and in fact, sometimes blandly stereotypical. This tendency markedly detracts from the overall wonder of the book. I'm speaking specifically of Shalimar and the ambassador's wife, who, it seems, can barely utter a coherent phrase without resorting to language only apropos for the estate's fox hunting outings.

Still, a great writer, and a great, compelling read that pulls you into a different world in a way in which you can see the "difference" both clearly and almost personally...so much so that very quickly it no longer seems different. I think in fiction writing, that's called "success."
Very interesting story though the descriptions are a bit long sometimes
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