» » The Light Bearer

The Light Bearer ePub download

by Donna Gillespie

  • Author: Donna Gillespie
  • ISBN: 0515119660
  • ISBN13: 978-0515119664
  • ePub: 1600 kb | FB2: 1671 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Jove (November 1, 1996)
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 368
  • Format: lrf mobi mbr lit
The Light Bearer ePub download

When Donna Gillespie's Light Bearer came out, I quickly snatched up the book and dug in. I very much enjoy historical fiction and was immediately immersed as she began to describe the settings of the birth of her primary character. I devoured the book in days, unable to put it down.

When Donna Gillespie's Light Bearer came out, I quickly snatched up the book and dug in. It was rich in detail, well written, engaging, and inspiring. Amongst this list are

When Donna Gillespie's Light Bearer came out, I quickly snatched up the book and dug in. Amongst this list are

The Light Bearer is a 1994 historical novel by Donna Gillespie set in first century Rome, during the reigns of the Emperors Nero and Domitian.

The Light Bearer is a 1994 historical novel by Donna Gillespie set in first century Rome, during the reigns of the Emperors Nero and Domitian. The novel centers upon three historical events: the Emperor Domitian’s war with the Germanic Chattian tribe in 83 . the inauguration of the Colosseum, or Amphitheatrum Flavium; and the assassination of Domitian. In dramatizing the assassination, the author follows the details given by first-century Roman historian Suetonius.

The Light Bearer book. I traveled along with a feisty Germanic leader captured by the Romans. She made me cold in the bleak winter and sweaty in the Roman sunshine.

32 people like this topic.

by. Gillespie, Donna. ark:/13960/t6qz3cr43.

By (author) Donna Gillespie. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Author: Donna Gillespie ISBN 10: 0340609222. Title: The Light Bearer Item Condition: used item in a very good condition. Used-Very Good: The book will be clean without any major stains or markings, the spine will be in excellent shape with only minor creasing, no pages will be missing and the cover is likely to be very clean. Read full description. See details and exclusions. The Light Bearer by Donna Gillespie (Paperback, 1994). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Auriane, daughter of a Rhine River area chieftain in 50 A.D., must face her difficult destiny and lead her people against the invading legions of the Roman Empire
blodrayne
There is much I could say about "The Light Bearer" which has already been said, but as I don't review all the books in McCullough's Masters of Rome series (of which I've ready each book), I don't feel I can properly do justice to the greatness of this sweeping epic, which unlike McCullough's work, spans not just from Rome, but from a not well known Germanic tribe called the Chattians.

Gillespie does an amazing job of keeping Rome and Germania separate in writing details, with an inevitable connection between the two. Much is equally known about both the Chattians and the Romans as if written by two authors with the same writing style.

Some high points I point out are the very subtle rise of Domitianus's deranged paranoia and Caligulan/Neronian style reign, though the foreshadowing was a bit too obvious for my tastes.

Other interesting bits are the use and apparent source of commonly known modern things among the Chattians, such as the Goddess of the underworld, Hel, and the Eastre celebration, involving children dressed as rabbits and the hiding of colored eggs.

Because the flaws are so few and insignificant in the face of the greater elements, I think it's easier to point them out:

The writing is very sumptuous, but often at times it can get too dense and bogged down in details. This occurs mostly the first time Auriane enters the Colisseum.

Also, the sex. I've become used to ancient historical novels writing sex scenes very metaphorically and obtusely, without using direct wording. Gillespie appears to take it to such an extreme, with the vividly flowery writing between Marcus and Auriane's lovemaking that it becomes like a dense poem jackknifing from the wonders of nature and life and the gods in an obtuse manner, you nearly forget that the two characters are having sex. So over the top is the writing, that the way Gillespie describes it, you'd think Auriane was having blinding orgasms at just Marcus's touch on her arm or chest.

With the state of Rome at this point, and the main character being a foreigner and enemy to Rome, it's inevitable that a bias against Rome would be drawn, but the male character of Marcus Arrius Julianus is so much the outcast that there is little distinction between how Auriane and Marcus view the Roman world despite their differences. Auriane views Rome as savage and barbaric, and a plague on Fria's realm, whereas Marcus views it in somewhat the same fashion, but figures it's all he has, so he may as well love it.

Aside from Julianus and some of the senators friendly to him, you'd think Rome was a festering pot of corruption, barbarity, and bloodlust the epitome of the Roman view of the barbarians, while the Chattians are viewed as pure, natural, children of the earth that can do no wrong and are victimized by everyone from Rome to their neighboring tribes. Any opposition to Baldemar, Auriane's father and chieftain of the Chattians, is viewed as petty greed and personal problems on the part of the dissenter.

Some forgiveable offenses include loose ends, which may be tied up in the sequel "Lady of the Light", or the as of yet unnamed second sequel, including both Marcus and Auriane having amulets of earth from their childhood, duplicates of one another, and Auriane's seeming mystical foresight.

All these flaws are minimal, in my view, and not much to drag the otherwise epic tale down a full star in rating.

There is one issue with both Auriane and Marcus Julianus which may detract some readers, though is apparently done in such a way that broad interpretation can explain it away as easily as it couldn't: Gillespie may be guilty of "Mary-Sue"ing with Auriane and Marcus Julianus. Both seem to be greater than their surroundings, meant for greater things not yet known to either, and with little to no flaws beyond what their separate societies have naturally imbued in them (stubborn traditionalism in Auriane, cynic realism in Marcus), and beautiful physiques. From a certain point of view, many of their actions or words appear to be Mary Sue-ish reflections of the author's own point of view (determined by the narrative) or of a sense of moral or social well-being beyond that of someone from ancient times.

Or this could simply be the tired ramblings of a fussy reader.

Either way, the over 1000 page epic was a great read, and a highly insightful view into how the Germanic tribes of the early Roman Empire, and the early Roman Empire itself may have been.
Zyangup
I discovered this book by accident. Having read Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean Auel and been a member of her website I found this absolute gem listed in her alternate reading suggestions.

I love all books set in the ancient past (Egypt, Greece, Rome etc) and beyond and have read enough to fill large bookshelves. Nothing however compares to this.

The book is an absolute page turner. It action, adventure, romance all rolled into one. If you get to page 50 (of 788 pages) and are not hooked on this book in a mesmerised way then you are clearly not a fan of the genre.

Donna has created a tale so alive it is like the prose comes to life in photographic detail. Her imagery of Ancient Rome, its people, politics, entertainment, philosophers, and life are breathtaking. The less well known life of the German frontiers from a Roman and barbarian perspective with intra tribal infighting, and inter tribe rivalry, traditions, pagan rituals, survival and clashes with their Roman masters is fascinating.

Into this clear and crisp research is wound a story of Auriane. The daugher of a tribal chieftan waging war on the Romans. Born with a seeresses prophecy to match her noble status she tries to shrug this off and live the simple life of a regular tribeswoman - marriage and family. However unspeakable horrors follow her and her peoples lives and the prophecy can not be ignored.

Its two stories becoming one as Aurianes exploits become the embellishment of myth and legend finding their way back to Rome in the writings of the former Governor of this far flung province. When a chance reading of his fathers documented accounts of frontier life take place, the son, reknowned and respected Roman statesman Marcus Julianus is besotted with the galant image of Auriane the warrioress. Surrounded by the demanding and over pampered women of high nobility circles he yearns to see her for himself before the Roman legions close in and she is no more.

The blending of historical fact and fiction are seemless.

This book is a pager turner and so rich and complex, with intricate plots and twists that you can read it again and again and still feel inspired.
Gavirgas
I used to manage a book store, Therefore, I read a lot of books. When Donna Gillespie's Light Bearer came out, I quickly snatched up the book and dug in. I very much enjoy historical fiction and was immediately immersed as she began to describe the settings of the birth of her primary character. I devoured the book in days, unable to put it down. It was rich in detail, well written, engaging, and inspiring. I wanted more.

I have since recommended the book as one of my top historical favorites to anyone who asked. Amongst this list are:

The Outlander Series by Diana Gabaldon- Scottish time travel, romance, medical, very historical (accurate), Jacobite uprising
Lions of Ireland series by Morgan Lewellyn- Rise of the Irish kings
Birds of Prey (The Courtneys) series by Wilbur Smith- Tales of the British Courtney family and their adventures on the seas
The Warlock series by Wilbur Smith- Archaeological fiction, Pharonic Egypt, amazing story of an Egyptian slave
Red Branch- M. Lewellyn- tale of Irish Culhullen (I am sure I have spelled that wrong) who is a famous figure in Irish history

I was excited to find out that Donna had written a second novel in the Lightbearer story. I have not read more than a few pages yet due to a hefty work schedule (which requires reading tons of military literature), but from what I have read, it promises to be as wonderful as her first book.

I highly recommend this book. It is worth finding and enjoying. I have hunted down out of print copies and have given it as a gift many times!
E-Books Related to The Light Bearer: