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Memoirs of a Cavalier ePub download

by Daniel Defoe

  • Author: Daniel Defoe
  • ISBN: 0898759587
  • ISBN13: 978-0898759587
  • ePub: 1173 kb | FB2: 1925 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: University Press of the Pacific (May 25, 2002)
  • Pages: 276
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 956
  • Format: lrf mbr txt lit
Memoirs of a Cavalier ePub download

Daniel Defoe is, perhaps, best known to us as the author of RobinsonCrusoe, a book which has been the delight of generations of boys andgirls ever since the beginning of the eighteenth century.

Daniel Defoe is, perhaps, best known to us as the author of RobinsonCrusoe, a book which has been the delight of generations of boys andgirls ever since the beginning of the eighteenth century. For it wasthen that Defoe lived and wrote, being one of the new school of prosewriters which grew up at that time and which gave England new formsof literature almost unknown to an earlier age. Defoe was a vigorouspamphleteer, writing first on the Whig side and later for the Toriesin the reigns of William III and Anne.

Memoirs of a Cavalier (1720) is a work of historical fiction by Daniel Defoe, set during the Thirty Years' War and the English Civil Wars. The full title, which bore no date, was: The story of a merchant from York, shipwrecked on a Caribbean island. This refers to Robinson Crusoe not Mémoires of a Cavalier. The rest of the entry is correct. Winston Churchill modeled his six-volume histories The World Crisis and The Second World War on Memoirs of a Cavalier.

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Memoirs of a Cavalier. or. A Military Journal of the Wars in Germany, and the Wars in England. From the Year 1632 to the Year 1648. Last updated Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 13:08. To the best of our knowledge, the text of this work is in the Public Domain in Australia. Bookyards at Twitter. Bookyards at Pinterest.

Memoirs of a Cavalier has been added to your Cart. Defoe presents a story whose details reveal a way of life that is not just dead, but quite foreign to us moderns despite being part of the late Renaissance period. The memoir is so authentic that it quite fooled contemporaries into thinking that it was a real memoir! The beauty of it is by what is said and not said, it reveals a personal narrative whose strengths and weaknesses are self-explanatory and don't require constant self-analysis. by. Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731. Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Thirty Years' War, 1618-1648, Royalists, Soldiers. London, Oxford University Press.

Daniel Defoe's great talent as a writer was to speak in the voices of others. Such was the authenticity of this memoir of a 17th-century soldier of fortune that for over half a century it was considered to be genuine. The struggle of the narrator to turn his observations into facts and to make certain history out of his uncertain experiences combines with vivid descriptions of the battles of the Civil War to give the narrative its dramatic qualities. From the Year 1632 to the Year 1648 By: Daniel Defoe. Daniel Defoe (/ˌdænjəl dɨˈfoʊ/; c. 1660 – 24 April 1731), born Daniel Foe, was an English trader, writer, journalist, pamphleteer and spy, now most famous for his novel Robinson Crusoe.

kolos
It's hard to not only be taken to a different place, but to leave yourself mostly behind and really get into someone else's story. Today, most writers endlessly psychoanalyze people and their motivations and think that they're being deep by "getting into someone's head". However, most psychology is about as deep as a kiddie pool, and not as clean.

Defoe presents a story whose details reveal a way of life that is not just dead, but quite foreign to us moderns despite being part of the late Renaissance period. The memoir is so authentic that it quite fooled contemporaries into thinking that it was a real memoir! The beauty of it is by what is said and not said, it reveals a personal narrative whose strengths and weaknesses are self-explanatory and don't require constant self-analysis.

And this is a good thing for any of us today, IMHO.

As both a part of history with point of view and engaging tale, this is quite good. It may appeal more to those who have been a soldier or know European history of 1630-50, but I think it will have general appeal b/c the narrative voice is so strong.

Point to make - the 2-star review has a few of the facts incorrect, and I think misses the point on some of what is represented. The narrator DOES make personal judgments on events he witnesses, often stating it just that way. He says he found Italy not to his liking and explains why, for instance. He finds himself drawn to Gustavus Adolphus and explains why. Yes, there are many terrible events, but the Thirty Years War was particularly brutal and is critical to both a history of Western institutional religion and modern Germany.

Generally, I'd say this will appeal to people who want story and memoir with their history, rather than just modern historical analysis.
Pumpit
This is obviously one of Defoe's more obscure works. Part I begins in 1630. A young English nobleman, a second son, though his father's favorite, decides to see something of the world and begins traveling on the continent with a friend. He signs on with the troops of Gustavus Adolphus, king of Sweden, who's aiding German Protestants against, I think, the Catholics. This ten-year period occurs near the end of the Thirty Years War. My knowledge of seventeenth-century European history is practically nonexistent, so I didn't really understand the issues involved and didn't learn much more from this book.
In Part II, our nameless hero returns to England, where the Civil War between the Cavaliers (the king's troops) and the Roundheads (Puritans) is about to get underway. (It was at the end of the Civil War that Charles I was beheaded, after which the Commonwealth took over for eleven years until the restoration of Charles II in 1660.) I thought this part might be more interesting, as I do know something about English history, and it was.
Like A JOURNAL OF THE PLAGUE YEAR, this book, too, has a fictional narrator in a historical setting. If you like Defoe, you will not dislike this book. If you don't like Defoe, this book won't change your mind.
Snowseeker
Daniel Defoe's `hero' is a mercenary: `I confess, when I went into arms at the beginning of this war, I never troubled myself to examine sides. I was glad to hear the drums beat for soldiers, as if I had been a mere Swiss, that not cared which side went up or down, so I had my pay.'

He is full of admiration for the battle tactics of his masters. But, what happens after the battle is over doesn't bother him: towns delivered to the `fury of the soldiers', plundering, looting and slaughtering innocent women and children.

The soldier is amazed about the `prodigious stupid bigotry of the people' and `the entire empire of the priests over the souls and the bodies of people'. But he clearly sees that `religion is the pretence not the cause of war'. Behind the veil of religion lay the fundamental interests of the warring parties: the Protestant masters fighting the Catholics to keep their `privileges' (not paying the tithes to Rome and its clergy) and the Puritans fighting the King in order to restore the rights of their power base (Parliament).

This novel with all its massacres and diseases has only historical value as a picture of army life in the 17th century.

Only for historians and Defoe fans.
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