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After the Madness ePub download

by Sol Wachtler

  • Author: Sol Wachtler
  • ISBN: 0759245193
  • ISBN13: 978-0759245198
  • ePub: 1918 kb | FB2: 1204 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: e-reads.com (July 28, 2003)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 749
  • Format: docx mbr mobi azw
After the Madness ePub download

Wachtler's subsequent arrest, conviction, and incarceration for harassing his longtime lover precipitated a media feeding frenzy, revealing to the world his struggles with romantic attachment, manic depression, and drug abuse

Wachtler's subsequent arrest, conviction, and incarceration for harassing his longtime lover precipitated a media feeding frenzy, revealing to the world his struggles with romantic attachment, manic depression, and drug abuse. In this, his prison diary, Wachtler reveals the stark reality behind his vertiginous fall from the heights of the legal establishment to the underbelly of the criminal justice system

After the Madness book. Driving down the Long Island Expressway in November of 1992, Sol Wachtler was New York's Chief Judge and heir apparent to the New York Governorship.

After the Madness book. Suddenly, three van loads of FBI agents swerved in front of him - bringing his car and his legal career to a halt.

Solomon "Sol" Wachtler (born April 29, 1930) is an American lawyer and Republican politician from New York. He was Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals from 1985 to 1992

Solomon "Sol" Wachtler (born April 29, 1930) is an American lawyer and Republican politician from New York. He was Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals from 1985 to 1992. Wachtler's most famous quote, made shortly after his appointment as Chief Judge, was that district attorneys could get grand juries to "indict a ham sandwich.

After the Madness - Sol Wachtler. When I realized that I was not able to interrupt this monologue I asked two other physicians to join us in the hope that their presence in the room would calm him. A Judge’s Own Prison Memoir. To my dismay their presence only served to intensify his display and I asked them to leave.

After the Madness by Sol Wachtler. 3 people like this topic.

Sol Wachtler began his government career in 1963, when he was elected a councilman of the town of North Hempstead. He was appointed to the New York State Supreme Court in 1968 and elected to the Court of Appeals, New York’s highest court, in 1972. In 1985, he was appointed chief judge of the state of New York and the Court of Appeals.

Sol Wachter's book, After the MadnessIn 1992, Judge . Sol Wachter's book, After the Madness. In 1992, Judge Sol Wachtler was the head of the New York Court of Appeals, the most powerful appellate court in the country. He was good looking, charismatic and well-respected

Sol Wachter's book, After the MadnessIn 1992, Judge Sol Wachtler was the head of the New York Court of Appeals, the most powerful appellate court in the country. He was good looking, charismatic and well-respected. And he was completely out of his mind.

In November of 1992, New York's Chief Judge Sol Wachtler, an heir aparent to the governor's mansion, was arrested

In November of 1992, New York's Chief Judge Sol Wachtler, an heir aparent to the governor's mansion, was arrested. Suddenly, three van loads of FBI agents swerved in front of him-bringing his car and his legal career to a halt.

Driving down the Long Island Expressway in November of 1992, Sol Wachtler was New York's Chief Judge and heir apparent to the New York Governorship. Suddenly, three van loads of FBI agents swerved in front of him -- bringing his car and his legal career to a halt. Wachtlers subsequent arrest, conviction and incarceration for harassing his longtime lover precipitated a media feeding frenzy, revealing to the world his struggles with romantic obsession, manic-depression and drug abuse. With unflinching honesty, Wachtler draws upon his unique experience of living life on both sides of the bench to paint a chilling portrait of prison life interwoven with a no-holds-barred analysis of the shortcomings of the American legal justice system.
Ienekan
While dated (Judge Wachtler was released from prison over 20 years ago), I enjoyed this memoir a great deal. Most importantly, it reflects on the insights a formerly eminent jurist gained about the prison system while being incarcerated.

While at times there is an inherent arrogance to Judge Wachtler's point of view (while he blames himself for his plight, he also excuses it to his illness to a significant extent) his observations about the Federal sentencing guidelines, the prosecution of low level drug offenders and his anecdotes about the prisoners he met while incarcerated are extremely enlightening.

It was a quick read and well worth it, even if I didn't agree with all of his observations. It also chronicles a real tragedy - and he does seem to understand the incredible fall from grace that he underwent and the destruction of his otherwise pristine reputation.
Kison
Very well written and argued. I found myself drawn into Wachtler's suggested solutions to prison overcrowding and dehumanization of convicted felons. And he does a good job of weaving his ideas about system reform into his personal prison story to keep the reader's interest. This book, although decades old, is still relevant today because we have done so little to address the issues Wachtler raises. However, I'm always a little disappointed that some of the empathy that people in positions of power show seem to too often come when the issues affect them personally. Wachtler is concerned about prison reform after having experienced prison. Many conservative politicians become more liberal on gay rights after discovering that a child or family member is gay. Someday, hopefully, those in office will be able to look beyond their own personal situations and decide on the basis of what is fair and in the best interests of humanity.
Puchock
Judge Wachtler writes with passion about the life he had and the life he has. Beginning with a brief story of his professional standing and his illness that led to his downfall. Mostly he writes about what he experienced when he committed a crime and was apprehended and imprisoned for it. He describes his life in two prisons where he became intimate friends with convicted fellons of many hues while receiving visitis from family, friends, and former colleagues. He also describes his release and subsequent realization that he could not take up where he left off - instead he had to start over, something he has done. Judge Watchler focuses attention on the injustice from law enforcement practice of entrapments or stings. He also lays bare his soul on the unfair use of sentencing guidelines that do not allow judges to choose a punishment suitable to the crime. I recommend this book to anyone interested in American Justice in the 1990's.
Chi
An interesting personal story of one who upheld and decided the law to living as prisoner. It doesn't go into intimate details of his treatment in prison but the realities of his decisions and the individuals with whom he comes in contact in prison with whom he had a part in their sentencing. Well written
Yla
It actually will pretty interesting and insightful between what we think we know about prisons and prisoners and what the facts are.
Preve
A very good book that shows just how messed up our prison system is. Reform must be a priority. Quite an eye opener especially about the available medical treatment and rehabilitation services - practically non-existent.
Morlurne
I found this book of deep interest - having had a passion for the criminal justice system for all my adult life. Sol Wachtler was an increadible man, who lead a life of justice, doing good, and being a figure to look up to. Unfortunately, in a very human moment, he had a major break-down, which lead him to make some horrible mistakes. I do not fault the system for looking into him, and pursuing action - he did break the law. However, the treatment he recieved (or should I say lack of treatment - as he had suffered a mental break-down), and the situations he was put in, show how our prison system has become one of human warehousing instead of rehabilitation of offenders that can (if given the opportunity) return to leading positive lifestyles.

This was an excellent read, and written in an easy to read style. Highly recomended.
Very compelling book, just a tad depressing but its the real deal. What a contrast from being the Chief Justice of the highest Court in NY State to becoming just a number in a Federal Prison.
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