» » You Know When the Men Are Gone

You Know When the Men Are Gone ePub download

by Cassandra Campbell,Siobhan Fallon

  • Author: Cassandra Campbell,Siobhan Fallon
  • ISBN: 1452600384
  • ISBN13: 978-1452600383
  • ePub: 1185 kb | FB2: 1626 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Tantor Audio; Unabridged CD edition (January 20, 2011)
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 356
  • Format: mbr doc lrf lit
You Know When the Men Are Gone ePub download

As Siobhan Fallon shows in this collection of loosely interconnected short stories, each woman deals with her husband's absence differently. Track listing for You Know When the Men Are Gone: Disc 1.

As Siobhan Fallon shows in this collection of loosely interconnected short stories, each woman deals with her husband's absence differently. One wife, in an attempt to avoid thinking about the risks her husband faces in Iraq, develops an unhealthy obsession with the secret life of her neighbor. Another woman's simple trip to the PX becomes unbearable when she pulls into her Gold Star parking space. And one woman's loneliness may lead to dire consequences when her husband arrives home. "You Know When the Men Are Gone"-Track 1. "Camp Liberty"-Track 21. Disc 2.

Siobhan Fallon (Author), Cassandra Campbell (Narrator), Tantor Audio (Publisher). I was a soldier, and almost none of Fallon's fictional narratives rang falsely or contrived. If they didn't happen to me, they happened to someone I knew

Siobhan Fallon (Author), Cassandra Campbell (Narrator), Tantor Audio (Publisher). Get this audiobook plus a second, free. If they didn't happen to me, they happened to someone I knew. The crummy homecomings, the stress, the fear and frustration. I understand that many readers would want stories that focus on the positive, but at least from my point of view, I'm not emotionally affected by "positive" stories. I don't read fiction for the happy ending, because it usually won't make me feel anything special.

No part of this book may be reproduced, scanned, or distributed in any printed or. electronic form without permission.

Poignant and beautifully written, Fallon’s book especially excels as interpreted by narrator Cassandra Campbell. Campbell approaches each story as a self-contained piece, deftly avoiding the trap of not differentiating between stories. Each story is more moving than the last, and Campbell’s narration works in concert with Fallon’s masterful writing to ensure that each packs a unique emotional punch-whether one listens one at a time or back-to-back. This haunting collection is sure to impress.

A searing debut novel from the award-winning author of You Know When the Men are Gone, about jealousy, the unpredictable path of friendship, and the secrets kept in marriage, all set within the . expat community of the Middle East during the rise of the Arab Spring. A gripping, cleverly plotted novel with surprising bite.

Ellen held her back very straight and resisted figuring out the rank of the woman’s husband by her clothes or level of parenting skills. She would not play that game today.

Dear Siobhan Fallon, Yesterday I read your book. As I closed the book after reading the last story in You Know When the Men Are Gone, I couldn't help thinking that you also know when an important new talent has emerged on the literary scene. Today, in between the depressing news in the New York Times and the trivial news in the Chicago Tribune, I read it again.

Written by Siobhan Fallon, Audiobook narrated by Cassandra Campbell. You Know When the Men Are Gone. Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell.

BookDragon Books for the Multi-Culti Reader Not nearly as lucky (resilient? blessed?) are most of Fallon’s fictional.

BookDragon Books for the Multi-Culti Reader. You Know When the Men Are Gone by Siobhan Fallon. All is definitely not fair in love and wa. nd off the battlefields, the most sacred institutions – especially marriage and family – take the hardest hits. Siobhan Fallon‘s debut collection bears expert witness to the dangers of deployment for those left behind: according to her biography, she lived at Fort Hood in Texas while her husband was deployed to Iraq for two tours of duty. Not nearly as lucky (resilient? blessed?) are most of Fallon’s fictional characters in her eight starkly indelible stories here.

In Fort Hood housing, like all army housing, you get used to hearing through the walls. You learn too much. And you learn to move quietly through your own small domain. You also know when the men are gone. No more boots stomping above, no more football games turned up too high, and, best of all, no more front doors slamming before dawn as they trudge out for their early formation, sneakers on metal stairs, cars starting, shouts to the windows above to throw them down their gloves on cold desert mornings. Babies still cry, telephones ring, Saturday morning cartoons screech, but without the men, there is a sense of muted silence, a sense of muted life.There is an army of women waiting for their men to return to Fort Hood, Texas. As Siobhan Fallon shows in this collection of loosely interconnected short stories, each woman deals with her husband's absence differently. One wife, in an attempt to avoid thinking about the risks her husband faces in Iraq, develops an unhealthy obsession with the secret life of her neighbor. Another woman's simple trip to the PX becomes unbearable when she pulls into her Gold Star parking space. And one woman's loneliness may lead to dire consequences when her husband arrives home. In gripping, no-nonsense stories that will leave you shaken, Fallon allows you into a world tightly guarded by gates and wire. It is a place where men and women cling to the families they have created as the stress of war threatens to pull them apart.Track listing for You Know When the Men Are Gone:Disc 1"You Know When the Men Are Gone"-Track 1"Camp Liberty"-Track 21Disc 2"Remission"-Track 15Disc 3"Inside the Break"-Track 7"The Last Stand"-Track 22Disc 4"Leave"-Track 14Disc 5"You Survived the War, Now Survive the Homecoming"-Track 6"Gold Star"-Track 17
Celore
I read some of the negative reviews before writing this, just to understand the opposing point of view. I get where some of them are coming from - that these stories have that MFA feel of workshopped 'perfection' that comes from drafting at expense of personality (I have an MFA too). Other negative reviews complained this focuses on negative aspects of Army family life.

I understand where they were coming from but don't agree. The polish earned from an MFA is just that - polish and skill. So it's not a negative unless education and training are somehow considered a bad thing.

I was a soldier, and almost none of Fallon's fictional narratives rang falsely or contrived. If they didn't happen to me, they happened to someone I knew. The crummy homecomings, the stress, the fear and frustration. I understand that many readers would want stories that focus on the positive, but at least from my point of view, I'm not emotionally affected by "positive" stories. I don't read fiction for the happy ending, because it usually won't make me feel anything special. These are stories about men at war and women at home, and if they aren't heartbreaking, I'm not sure what the point would be.

A couple of the stories didn't ring false, but weren't as strong as others. A couple do end very abruptly, and while I don't expect to have my hand held, I do prefer a solid conclusion. But, short stories don't always exist to give the reader a complete conclusion - they exist as moments of time.

But, any small complaints aside, I really liked these stories. She presented fully-realized characters who came across as real people living believable representations of events. I cared about the characters, and I liked how Fallon connected the stories together with their repeated appearances across the stories. Sometimes it was just a subtle repetition of a name; other characters were equally pivotal in multiple stories, but in different ways.

It would be a shame if concerns about the "negative" storylines steered readers away - and I'm not sure Fallon's fellow Army wives or other veterans are the best audience anyway. They don't really need Fallon's made-up stories about what they lived through.

But after 10 years of war, there's value here to NON-military readers. Most of the stories are heartbreaking and sad, but that's what happens when you're 21 and you get your foot blown off, and then your wife leaves you. It isn't happy. It is sad. And guess what - it happens, and not that rarely.

So, fictionally, this is as close as most readers will come to those kind of hard days, but at least it will open that window a tiny bit.
Abandoned Electrical
"In my stories...I wanted to capture the moments that lead up to a deployment as well as those that follow a return. And I wanted to focus not only on the soldiers fighting on the front lines but also on the families that wait at home and try their best to stay intact, try their best to find everything they need within those guarded gates." –Siobhan Fallon

I thoroughly enjoyed this collection of stories. I was born and raised in a city that houses the largest Army installation in the United States. The base itself is insular, and it wasn't until my return after a ten year absence from my hometown, that I was able to work along side army wives, veterans, and soldiers. I love hearing about their experiences, their hometowns, and how they're coping. These stories could be about anyone, and wherein their beauty lies. I was left wanting more! I read the opening paragraph at 1:00 this afternoon, and read the final sentence four hours later. That's not characteristic for me, but the interweaving stories were so immersive, her style of prose so welcoming. I cannot wait to read her full length novel, The Confusion of Languages.
Vudogal
As the daughter of a career Army officer, the wife of a vet, and the sister of a vet.... I cannot salute this writer enough. Raised on Army posts, the lives of dependents are nothing like the rest of Americans. The wives are the real heroes, breaking their hearts, living in limbo, tortured daily by reality and and all that it isn't.
This is an amazing collection of short stories, by a brilliant author.
I read it non-stop, cover to over. Bravo!
Monin
Although I was a Navy brat, not an army brat, there is much I could relate to in these stories of the families left behind when the men are deployed. Although they are presented as fiction, each story rings true to life, as Fallon writes about women trying to raise a family alone, men wondering what their women are up to, and the difficulties of readjustment to a spouse returning after a long separation. There's friendship and community for the wives, but each has to make her own way, and no matter how much support there is, each is essentially alone.
E-Books Related to You Know When the Men Are Gone: