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Gods Monsters: Short Fiction Collection, Volume 1 ePub download

by Gene O'Neill,Brett Savory,Gord Rollo

  • Author: Gene O'Neill,Brett Savory,Gord Rollo
  • ISBN: 1480133140
  • ISBN13: 978-1480133143
  • ePub: 1236 kb | FB2: 1840 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (October 26, 2012)
  • Pages: 220
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 570
  • Format: azw txt lrf mobi
Gods  Monsters: Short Fiction Collection, Volume 1 ePub download

by Gord Rollo (Author), Brett Savory (Author), Gene O'Neill (Author) & 0 more

by Gord Rollo (Author), Brett Savory (Author), Gene O'Neill (Author) & 0 more. Grab your bible, your crucifix, your holy water, and whatever else makes you feel comforted and safe - you just might need them.

Start by marking Gods & Monsters: Rollo's Short Fiction (Short Fiction Collection Book 1) as Want to Read .

Start by marking Gods & Monsters: Rollo's Short Fiction (Short Fiction Collection Book 1) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Gods & Monsters book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Gods & Monsters: Short Fiction Collection Vol. 1 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

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Published by EnemyOne. Thank you for supporting our work! INTRODUCTION. Call me insane (and trust me, many have) but I happen to love fiction that is set in a different time than present day. Especially dark fiction; obviously. The author can set their stories in the far future or way back in the past – there is just something about different time-frames that turn my crank.

Gods & Monsters - Gord Rollo. Rollo's Short Fiction, Volume 1. Gord Rollo. My good friend and long time writing mentor, Gene O’Neill is always telling me that when you write about something that’s been on your mind you’ll finally start to realize how you truly feel about that particular topic. I suppose that might be why so much of my fiction - long and short - tends to have a religious angle to it. It’s a topic that fascinates me and terrifies me at the same time.

Since storytellers first put pen to paper, religious dogma and spiritual beliefs have always played key roles in the various genres of dark fiction. Humanity's obsession with mortality and what might or might not happen after our inevitable deaths has long been tantalizing fodder for authors and dreamers alike.

Gods & Monsters features the following short stories: Divine Intervention, Chamber of the Gods (Co-written with .

Gods & Monsters features the following short stories: Divine Intervention, Chamber of the Gods (Co-written with Brett Savory), Chopper's Hands, Love; In Pieces, Breath of an Angel/Touch of the Devil (Co-written with Gene O'Neill), The Last Straw, Moving Pictures, The Face of an Unlikely Go. more).

Time & Space (Short Fiction Collection Vol. 2). Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

reprinted in Gord Rollo's Unnatural Selection: A Collection of Darwinian Nightmares anthology (LTDBooks, October 2000; Cosmos Books, August 2001)

Short Story Collections. Short Stories, Novellas. 2 Awards & honorable mentions. reprinted in Gord Rollo's Unnatural Selection: A Collection of Darwinian Nightmares anthology (LTDBooks, October 2000; Cosmos Books, August 2001). Pop! Goes the Weasel" (with Brian A. Hopkins) -Bad Dreams ( 1999).

Gene O'Neill is best known as a multi-award nominated writer of science fiction, fantasy, and horror fiction. O'Neill's professional writing career began after completing the Clarion West Writers Workshop in 1979. Since that time, over 100 of his works have been published. His short story work has appeared in Cemetery Dance Magazine, Twilight Zone Magazine, The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, and many more.

Since storytellers first put pen to paper, religious dogma and spiritual beliefs have always played key roles in the various genres of dark fiction. Humanity's obsession with mortality and what might or might not happen after our inevitable deaths has long been tantalizing fodder for authors and dreamers alike. REGARDLESS OF OUR FAITH, EVERYONE FEARS DEATH... Now collected together for the first time ever, acclaimed horror and fantasy author Gord Rollo shares his own dark visions about the cruel gods and vicious monsters that wander his imagination and keep him awake at night. Grab your bible, your crucifix, your holy water, and whatever else makes you feel comforted and safe - you just might need them. Within this volume you'll find stories of shattered faith, drowned hopes, haunted spirits, fallen angels, and the paralyzing fear of the unknown abyss that awaits us all after we've taken our final breath... Special content: This collection includes Story Notes on each individual story from the author as well as an Introduction. Gods & Monsters features the following short stories: Divine Intervention, Chamber of the Gods (Co-written with Brett Savory), Chopper's Hands, Love; In Pieces, Breath of an Angel/Touch of the Devil (Co-written with Gene O'Neill), The Last Straw, Moving Pictures, The Face of an Unlikely God.
Musical Aura Island
Let's get right into this one:

Divine Intervention - A priest has lost his faith and is looking for a sign. Be careful what you wish for. Not really my bag. It didn't do much for me.

2 1/2 stars out of 5

Chamber of the Gods - Lovecraftian-influenced tale about a commercial pilot that is starting to crack up. His co-pilot friend talks him into using an isolation chamber to relieve his body of stress and try to get his old self back. Instead of his old self, he finds something else in that chamber.

4 out of 5 stars

Chopper's Hands - A psychotic reverend gets busted when it's discovered that he's murdered 30 people while claiming to be on a mission from God. He was locked up in an insane asylum where he began preaching his demented gospel to the inmates and causing trouble. After a strange suicide where his hands were chopped off and never found, an inmate swears that he's being pursued by "Chopper's Hands". A fun story that reminds me of old EC Comics.

5 out of 5 stars

Love; In Pieces - Set in Edward Lee's Infernal Hell series as a backdrop, Nick will do anything to save his beloved wife who has been captured by Satan. Love; In Pieces has an obvious comic book feel, but also harbors an effective love story too.

4 out of 5 stars

Breath of an Angel/Touch of the Devil - Equal parts hard-boiled crime story, serial killer horror, and dark fantasy. A detective that is harboring a mountain of guilt for bust that went bad and cost a young boy his life. Him and his partner are investigating a serial murder that happens to take place every 28 days and all of the victims have something in common, especially with his partner. A well written story that Rollo co-wrote with Gene O'Neill.

4 out of 5 stars

The Last Straw - In 1936, while the drought had turned the central states into a dust bowl, for Miller's Grove, Iowa, the cornfields were remarkably strong. To add insult to injury, an unknown killer was abducting young girls. With tensions high, Reverend Joshua Miller's sermons are reaching a fever pitch. One day, the Reverend claims that God has spoken to him and told him that the town's mentally handicapped boy was responsible for the murders and the town is afraid to stop him from being the judge, jury and executioner. Is the Reverend right or has he lost his mind? A great story that is actually a prelude to Rollo's excellent Valley of the Scarecrow.

5 out of 5 stars

Moving Pictures - When small-time mafia thug, Ronnie, is on his "collection" route, he notices a new tattoo parlor opening up in his neighborhood. Trying to win favor with his boss by shaking down the Chinese owner, Ronnie is offered a free tattoo in exchange for more time to come up with his extortion money. But this isn't any 'ol tattoo artist. No this Chinese gentleman knows a rare and secret art. A kick ass story with great characters and visuals.

5 out of 5 stars

The face of an Unlikely God - In 1963, Professor Leonard Harris can't believe his good fortune as he becomes the first white man to be allowed to research and observe the Huaorani tribe that live in the remote Amazon jungle. He learns that they worship the Great Jaguar as their deity. The nearby tribe, the Quatuani, whom they've been warring with for hundreds of years worships the pirahna as their deity. When professor Harris finds himself involved in a sacred ritual of the Huaorani, the tribe believes they have unlocked Harris's destiny.

Rollo has packed so much into so few pages, there is no way you can resist not finishing The Face Of An Unlikely God in one sitting. It simply pulls you into the story with its mesmerizing qualities with images so vivid, you'd swear you were there.

5 out of 5 stars

Rollo is an outstanding author that I've always felt never got enough credit. His writing is so visual and his characters are so lifelike. The only story in this whole lot that I wasn't a fan of was Divine Intervention and it was't because it was a bad story. The subject matter simply didn't interest me. That's it. It may work for you. As for the rest of them, way too much good stuff to ignore. Pick it up now.

Overall - 4 1/2 Deities out of 5

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Ghile
A few years ago, I happened to be in a drugstore and decided to check out the paperback books they had for sale. What I stumbled upon that day was The Jigsaw Man by Gord Rollo. I read it while sitting outside a Starbucks in a single afternoon and became an instant fan of Rollo's work. Since then, I've read everything of his I've managed to get my hands on. So imagine my elation when I found out he was releasing not one, but two story collections. Gods and Monsters is the first of these two collections.

Again, I read it in almost record time. I read all but one story yesterday and finished the last tale earlier today at work. Since I find it difficult to discuss a collection as a whole, I will discuss each story individually.

1. Divine Intervention: In my opinion, the weakest story of the collection. Though it offers a well-rounded main character and it's a story that uses a full range of emotion, I found the plot a bit unoriginal and the twist at the end overused and predictable. I personally didn't think this was a good story to start off the collection. To be honest, I was a bit disappointed when I read it, as I find it's beneath Rollo's usual work.

2. Chamber of the Gods: Written with Brett Savory, I found this to be a very original tale. It's definitely inspired by Lovecraft and Rollo handles it very well. When I started reading it, I was curious as to how someone could make a story about a guy in a sensory deprivation tank interesting, but I must say the authors pulled this one off.

3. Chopper's Hands: A story that takes place in an asylum, I thought I had this one figured out. I was expecting the same tired haunting tale and could have sworn I saw the end coming a mile away. I am happy to report this story threw me for a loop. I never knew what hit me by the end of this tale. In this one, Rollo does a very good job building one's curiosity during the story. Why is Tanner's supervisor so secretive about the patient that used to live in the asylum? And why are some of the other patients still scared of him? You won't want to put this story down until you find out.

4. Love; In Pieces: This story is a tribute to Edward Lee's Infernal series, which takes place in Lee's vision of Hell, where instead of a wasteland of fire and brimstone, Hell has become a thriving metropolis. I'm a big fan of Ed Lee's trilogy (as well as the anthology of stories based in this universe Infernally, Yours). Here, Rollo paints a unique love story that takes place, in all places, Hell. This is definitely a story where you're rooting for the protagonist to overcome all odds and rescue his wife. Despite the locale, this is actually a touching story in its own way.

5. Breath of an Angel/Touch of the Devil: Another collaboration, this one written with Gene O'Neill. I've read stories written in the second person before, and I find they are rarely done well. What made this one different is that it's written in first, second, and third person points of view. I found it confusing at first, but you get the hang of it the further you go into the story. It's not the best story in the collection, but it has some well-rounded, complex characters and an intriguing plot. Not to mention an ending I doubt anyone could guess before reading. It's a police procedural as well as a horror story and a mystery that will remain so until the very end. I definitely had to keep reading to see where this one was going.

6. The Last Straw: A tie-in story to Rollo's novel Valley of the Scarecrow. To be honest, had I not read the novel before the story, I'm not sure I would have enjoyed this one as much as I did. It does have some interesting characters and there are a few parts that will tug at your heartstrings for sure, but I found it much more enjoyable having read the novel when it first came out and being able to recognize what would happen after the events in this story take place. Definitely a decent story on it's own, but I recommend reading Valley of the Scarecrow first, it may enhance the experience as it did for me.

7. Moving Pictures: When I was a kid (though I'm a bit ashamed to admit this) i was a fan of the show Family matters. I wondered while reading this if Rollo also watched the show as I first heard of the the plot of this tale on that show. I don't want to give to much away, but it's basically about a thug trying to make his way in the criminal underworld by collecting protection money from local small businesses. He bites off a bit more than he can chew when he goes after the new tattoo artist who's just opening up shop in the neighborhood. A great story that doesn't necessarily have a major twist at the end, but is very suspenseful and intriguing.

8. The Face of an Unlikely God: I love the title and Gord describes this in the Story Notes as his favorite of his short stories. I can see why. This tale is definitely a good one to end the collection. It takes place in Ecuador, both past and present, and Rollo paints a vivid picture of the Jungles of South America. The backdrop is two warring tribes and a visiting white man who is caught in the middle along with two friends. This is one of those stories you can't put down. The entire time I found myself wanting to get to the end just to find out where Rollo was taking me with this. There's suspense in this one as well as an intriguing ritual that I had to read some parts over to make sure I read it right the first time. A few descriptions made me cringe. Definitely a great tale.

All in all, this is a strong collection. Not all the stories were my cup of tea, but I can't say I really disliked any of them. After having finished this book, I'm glad another collection is hot on its heels. In the Story Notes, Gord points out that short fiction isn't easy for him to write. In my opinion, he sure makes it look easy.
Blackredeemer
There is a spoiler in this review, so take heed!

I am not a frequent reader of horror stories, so I didn't know what to expect from this collection. I thought it probable that the stories would be fairly suspenseful, if not completely original, given the theme. They fit this expectation and were pretty entertaining, but Rollo's storytelling could use some work. There is a tendency to tell instead of show the reader what happens, which leaves the characters somewhat flat, following an omnipotent voice from action to action instead of demonstrating intrinsic motivation. Rollo also lacks subtlety. For instance, in the tale set in the deprivation chamber, Sims finds himself chained to a rock as a huge Lovecraftian monster/God looks down on him. We not only get a blatant statement that it is an altar to said God, but are told that Sims is the offering. This is all followed by a description of the God partaking of his heart and thanking him for the sacrifice. I should think only the action is necessary, as there is plenty of context without explaining everything.

Also, although they do not distract terribly from the plot, the noticeable grammatical errors (word confusion, misplaced commas, occasional run-on sentences) made me wish I could edit as I was reading.

Overall, this collection allowed me to banish boredom, but it didn't leave me too eager to read more of the author's work.
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