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Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty (Penguin Classics) ePub download

by John W. De Forest,Gary Scharnhorst

  • Author: John W. De Forest,Gary Scharnhorst
  • ISBN: 0140437576
  • ISBN13: 978-0140437577
  • ePub: 1340 kb | FB2: 1316 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics (March 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 544
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 320
  • Format: doc txt lrf docx
Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty (Penguin Classics) ePub download

Miss Ravenel's Conversion. has been added to your Cart. John De Forest's novel is part romance and part war story. These strands of the story are interweaved well and are fascinating for the insight they give into life in the 1860s.

Miss Ravenel's Conversion. The romance is at times quite conventional with Lillie constantly blushing and occasionally swooning, but the story also contains unusual elements for a 19th century novel. The story includes a woman seeking an affair with a married man, a man keeping an apartment for his mistress and a Union officer conquering not only a Southern town, but also two of the women in it.

By Miss MULOCK, Author of "John Halifax, Gentleman," "A Noble Life," "Christian's Mistake," &c. Other author's books: Miss Ravenel's conversion from secession to loyalty. The Brigade Commander. By J. ROSS BROWNE, Author of "An American Family in Germany," "Crusoe's Island," "Yusef," &c.

Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secessions to Loyalty. by John William De Forest. Drawing on his own combat experience in the Union forces, John W. De Forest crafted a war novel like nothing before it in the annals of American literature.

From GoodReads: Miss Ravenel’s Conversion is important in American literary history as the first novel to depict the Civil War with realism. Its battlefield scenes owe much to John De Forest’s own experience as a captain in that conflict

From GoodReads: Miss Ravenel’s Conversion is important in American literary history as the first novel to depict the Civil War with realism. Its battlefield scenes owe much to John De Forest’s own experience as a captain in that conflict. But in 1867 genteel readers were affronted by De Forest’s frank view of war and sex. Though praised by William Dean Howells, the novel was forgotten after De Forest’s death in 1906. It was later rediscovered by Van Wyck Brooks and other critics

By John W. De Forest Introduction by Gary Scharnhorst People Who Read Miss Ravenel’s Conversion from Secessions to Loyalty Also Read. Inspired by Your Browsing History.

By John W. De Forest Introduction by Gary Scharnhorst. By John W. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. People Who Read Miss Ravenel’s Conversion from Secessions to Loyalty Also Read.

Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty (1867) is an American Civil War novel by veteran John William DeForest

Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty (1867) is an American Civil War novel by veteran John William DeForest. In contrast to much of the Civil War fiction that had gone before it, Miss Ravenel's Conversion portrayed war not in the chivalric, idealized manner of Walter Scott, but as a bloody and inglorious hell.

Start by marking Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty as Want to Read . Drawing on his own combat experience with the Union forces, John W.

Start by marking Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. His first-hand knowledge of "the More panoramic in scope and more realistic in its details than Crane's Red Badge of Courage, this is one of the first and best novels ever written about the American Civil War.

John William De Forest. This book is considered to be one of the best novels about Civil War ever written. It tells the story of Lillie Ravenel who with her father are deported from Louisiana at the beginning of the Civil . .ar. Lillie is a passionate Confederate, but her father's loyalist sympathies make them to escape to New England. In the fictional city called New Boston they meet two men who fall in love with Lillie. These men fight for Lillie at the same time as fighting for the Union.

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global . Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/All Book Genres/Fiction & Literature‎. product description page. Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secessions to Loyalty - (Penguin Classics) by John W De Forest

With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secessions to Loyalty - (Penguin Classics) by John W De Forest.

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More panoramic in scope and more realistic in its details than Crane's Red Badge of Courage, this is one of the first and best novels ever written about the American Civil War Drawing on his own combat experience with the Union forces, John W. De Forest crafted a war novel like nothing before it in the annals of American literature. His first-hand knowledge of "the wilderness of death" made its way on to the pages of his riveting novel with devastating effect. Whether depicting the tedium before combat, the unspoken horror of battle, or the grisly butchery of the field hospital, De Forest broke new ground, anticipating the realistic war writings of Ernest Hemingway, Norman Mailer, and Tim O'Brien. A commercial failure in its own day, De Forest's story was praised by Henry James and William Dean Howells, who, comparing it favorably to War and Peace, acclaimed the book "one of the best American novels ever written."For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
crazy mashine
This is a really great story. It is witty and insightful and has some beautiful metaphors. It is long but a great novel. Love it.
Macill
This is a very good novel and it behooves every Civil War student to read this book. Books written today about the War often say more about our times than the War; that's why I like this book. My great-grandfather fought with the Sixth Kentucky Volunteers (USA) in the Western Theater. His father was wounded at Chicamauga and sent home. Reading this book allowed me to glimpse into that time, not from the perspective of a modern day author, but from the perspective of one who really lived the War. His battle descriptions are fascinating and, for my money, his finest passage begins on p. 307 (Penguin Edition) with "Such was the defense of Fort Winthrop..." I think that DeForest wonderfully captures the wistfulness of those individuals who experienced the raw energy of battle (e.g. Oliver Wendell Holmes' descriptions on his service) and realize, with a bit of relief, but with a bit of melancholy that he will never have that feeling again. All veterans live with this kind of thought, I think; DeForest captures the Civil War veteran's thinking here perfectly.

One more thing positive about this novel: DeForest's use of characters, who are Southern and yet against secession, is a fine change of pace from modern novels which can only offer up tired cliches of North/South characters. DeForest's characters seem closer to the truth than our modern sensibilities allow (especially when it comes to race). This is a novel really worth reading for many reasons.
Quellik
Note: I read the Univ. of Nebraska Press edition.

Does this novel depict the Civil War realistically? Yes. Is Lillie Ravenel the strong heroine depicted by the book's description? No. She comes off as a bit silly, actually. Miss Ravenel's Conversion is less about Miss Ravenel's conversion and more about life during the Civil War (wait, I'm in the South...War of Northern Aggression) and domestic affairs at the time. The first half of the book was rather boring, being mostly about Lillie's friendship with two military men, the drinking, philandering Carter and the gentle lawyer Colborne, and how she eventually decides which of the two she'll marry. It sounds kind of Jane Austen-esque, but De Forest fails to make it very interesting. The second half of the novel picks up some, however, with descriptions of battles and military life, Lillie's father's plantation experiment with free black labor, and Carter's eventual dissolution into political corruption and adultery. While De Forest's characterizations of women and Southerners seemed rather degrading, he doesn't glorify the Union, either (again with Carter's corruption, and there's some comical bits about drunk and/or cowardly commanders). After all, the novel is considered a work of realist literature.
Munimand
Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty may have a cumbersome title, but it is an enjoyable read. It tells the story of Lillie Ravenel who with her father are exiled from Louisiana at the beginning of the Civil War. Lillie is an ardent Confederate, but her father's loyalist sympathies force them to take refuge in New England. In the fictional city of New Boston, they meet two men who both fall in love with Lillie. These men fight for Lillie at the same time as fighting for the Union. It is through these relationships and through her experiences on returning to occupied Louisiana that Lillie's gradual conversion occurs.
John De Forest's novel is part romance and part war story. These strands of the story are interweaved well and are fascinating for the insight they give into life in the 1860s. The romance is at times quite conventional with Lillie constantly blushing and occasionally swooning, but the story also contains unusual elements for a 19th century novel. The story includes a woman seeking an affair with a married man, a man keeping an apartment for his mistress and a Union officer conquering not only a Southern town, but also two of the women in it.
The battle scenes are well told and are clearly based on De Forest's experiences during the war. He is not afraid to show the consequences of battle, describing soldiers horribly mutilated with rotting wounds. The actual battle scenes are quite few in number and are mainly skirmishes. The only large-scale engagement in which the characters are involved is Port Hudson. This is a pity for with De Forest's writing skill, it would have been interesting if he had been involved in and given an account of one of the really great battles. Nevertheless he provides a detailed account of army life during the Civil War showing the bureaucracy and boredom, the frustration and pettiness, the bravery and the cowardice. His account is extremely one-sided and he has scarcely a good word to say about the Confederacy, but this adds to the fascination of the novel, for it gives the reader first-hand insight into the attitude of a Union veteran towards his beaten enemy and why it was that he fought against the South.
The Penguin edition of the novel has a good introduction with some helpful information about De Forest and the reception of his novel. It also has many useful notes especially those which translate phrases written in French and Latin. However it must be said that a lot of these notes are superfluous for most readers, e.g. explaining what the Mason Dixon Line is, or what the dodo was, and some of the notes are mistaken such as the statement that Stonewall Jackson commanded the Confederate forces at first Manassas.
Kirimath
This is perhaps the best novel with the worst title ever written. Set during the Civil War, the novel depicts the war in all its sordidness: the blunders, the incompetence, the poor leadership. Miss Ravenel is a Southerner who falls in love with a Union captain and gradually sheds her rebel coat for the Northern cause. De Forest's realism is admirable, his writing ability even more so. It's hard to think of a better novel about the Civil War than this one, the first to treat the war realistically. This is truly a minor American masterpiece and should be much better known.
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