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Detroit Tales (Michigan the Great Lakes) ePub download

by Jim Ray Daniels

  • Author: Jim Ray Daniels
  • ISBN: 0870136623
  • ISBN13: 978-0870136627
  • ePub: 1618 kb | FB2: 1272 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Genre Fiction
  • Publisher: Michigan State University Press; First Edition edition (March 31, 2003)
  • Pages: 184
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 143
  • Format: txt docx lrf mbr
Detroit Tales (Michigan  the Great Lakes) ePub download

The stories in Detroit Tales are tales about urban, working-class America

The stories in Detroit Tales are tales about urban, working-class America. People struggle both to remain in the city and to escape the city. The three central motifs of this collection are the city. Although I have never been to Detroit, I was able to appreciate and enjoy this book because I could readily identify with the decadence Daniels depicts so well with his characteristic honesty and realism.

Detroit Tales (Michigan & the Great Lakes). I only read about half of this book, which consists of a visceral collection of short stories by Pushcart Prize-winning author Jim Daniels and is set in white working-class Detroit in the 1970s

Detroit Tales (Michigan & the Great Lakes). 0870136623 (ISBN13: 9780870136627). I only read about half of this book, which consists of a visceral collection of short stories by Pushcart Prize-winning author Jim Daniels and is set in white working-class Detroit in the 1970s. I appreciated the fact that the characters in these stories find themselves struggling to survive or trying to escape the city, a reality that is still true for many Detroiters today.

Michigan & the Great Lakes. By (author) Jim Ray Daniels. Free delivery worldwide. When I finished the book, I was rattled to realize that there is nothing so frightening, so unsettling, as a life sharply observed.

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The stories in Detroit Tales are tales about urban, working-class America. The three central motifs of this collection are the city, the workplace, and the automobile. If these stories have one unifying theme, it is that escape is not the answer. When the pulls of friendship and love and personal responsibility draw us back to our ordinary homes and our ordinary jobs, we must trust those pulls, and we must lead those lives with as much dignity as we can muster. Download Detroit Tales (Michigan & the Great Lakes) by Jim Ray Daniels free.

Find nearly any book by Jim Ray Daniels. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780870138065 (978-0-87013-806-5) Softcover, Michigan State University Press, 2007. Find signed collectible books: 'Mr. Pleasant'.

Daniels, James R. was born on June 6, 1956 in Detroit, Michigan, United States ( The stories in Detroit Tales are tales about urban, w. Detroit Tales (Michigan & the Great Lakes) by Daniels, Jim Ray (2003) Paperback. was born on June 6, 1956 in Detroit, Michigan, United States. Son of Raymond J. and Mary T. Daniels. Bachelor, Alma College, 1978. Master of Fine Arts, Bowling Green State University, 1980. Professor English Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, since 1981 ) Detroit Tales (Michigan & the Great Lakes) by Daniels, Jim Ray (2003) Paperback. Married Kristin M. Kovacic, September 28, 1985. Children: Ramsey, Rosalie.

The stories in "Detroit Tales" are tales about urban, working-class America. In their cars, people negotiate the territory between work and home. Conflicts arise in the characters impulses to veer off their well-worn paths. What can they do? Where can they go?

The Greater Detroit had once been known as the "Queen of the Great Lakes"

The Greater Detroit had once been known as the "Queen of the Great Lakes" December 16 - The Detroit Lions lost to the Chicago Bears, 38-21, in a game that decided the NFL Western Division championship. The Lions had been seeking their fourth divisional championship in five years.

The stories in Detroit Tales are tales about urban, working-class America. People struggle both to remain in the city and to escape the city. The three central motifs of this collection are the city, the workplace, and the automobile. In their cars, people negotiate the territory between work and home. Conflicts arise in the characters’ impulses to veer off their well-worn paths. What can they do? Where can they go? What forces pull them away, and what forces pull them back? The characters search for what can provide spiritual sustenance. Often, the relief from the drudgery of their daily lives is provided in the fleeting dazzle of fireworks or Christmas lights, but they take what they can. If these stories have one unifying theme, it is that escape is not the answer. When the pulls of friendship and love and personal responsibility draw us back to our ordinary homes and our ordinary jobs, we must trust those pulls, and we must lead those lives with as much dignity as we can muster.

Ynneig
These are odd are short stories that once you get into them you cant stop reading, Most are from 30-40 years ago that I can relate too
Lo◘Ve
This book was required for a creative writing class that i am taking. I really like the style of Daniels's writing and his short stories are very relatable and easy to follow.
Briciraz
Although I have never been to Detroit, I was able to appreciate and enjoy this book because I could readily identify with the decadence Daniels depicts so well with his characteristic honesty and realism. As Daniels' characters come-of-age in their midwestern wasteland, they are challenged by the problems and dilemmas many of us faced during the seventies and eighties, but one reality that permeates virtually all of these tales is how, during these decades, we often desperately sought love and understanding from our families and from society. Daniels'characters try to deal with their own problems and dilemmas by escaping to other locales, by isolating themselves, or by remaining at home and making the best of it. Three tales that feature characters representative of the escape category are "Cross Country," "Renegade" and "Islands." In the first tale, EJ and fellow autoworker Jimmy climb into the latter's Gremlin and set off across the country in search of adventure and new jobs. In the second, Kenny, a Vietnam vet, joins a gang of mostly fellow assembly line buddies because he missed the "sense of togetherness" of the sixties, although at one point he flashes back to when he and Cheryl, his high school sweetheart, once in vain headed north out of Detroit to begin what they thought would be new lives. In "Islands," Gerry and his young wife attempt to carve a normal family life out of their Detroit neighborhood, which includes a halfway house/drug outlet across the highway from their residence. Other characters respond to the city's decadence with physical or psychological isolation. The narrator of "Good Neighbor" and her husband Terry have progressively isolated themselves from their rather peculiar neighbors. She explains, moreover, that they do not even sit out front anymore because,"Looking across the street at each other dying off, it's too depressing." When they receive a surprise visit from former neighbor Bert, the narrator vividly recalls how Bert had once stopped over to see her and inappropriately embraced her. The narrator of "Sugar Water," a late 20's autoworker, is about to break out of his social isolation through his relationship with Sue, but at the latter's graduation party, he explains how he had violated this relationship when he and Sue's longtime friend Karen had sneaked off to the park to have sex, commenting that, "Maybe I'm destined to drive by the houses of women all the nights of my life, wondering what's inside." Characters in the third category, however, are able to improve their lives by making the best of what they have, sometimes discovering love and understanding in their own back yards. A must-read here is "Middle of the Mitten," a lighthearted Chekhovian tale about a college senior named Avery, who is haunted by his best friend's suicide, involved with two very different coeds, and troubled because he must pass crusty old Professor Cornwall's astronomy class in order to graduate. Avery is able to combat his own suicidal tendencies through his gymnastic sexual relationship with nymphomaniacal Snake Lady Karen and through his chief love interest, Dawn, who is not interested in "sweaty" sex. Dawn is earning a "C" in Cornwall's class and Avery is failing; moreover, Cornwall had once observed how Avery's dog had relieved himself on the professor's front lawn, so that one day in class Cornwall halted his lecture to inquire of Avery, "Aren't you the one with the poopy dog?" After the class roars with laughter, Dawn passes the embarrassed senior a note, reassuring him that, "I still love you, even if you have a poopy dog." Yes, love and understanding can be found by some of Daniels' otherwise desperate characters--those whose day-to-day struggles play out within otherwise sordid and often depressing environments, and if you give these insightful tales about America's incredible decadence a chance, you may find yourself, like me, identifying with, if not laughing at, many of his finely realized characters and their often bizarre circumstances.
Pipet
Just as Jim Daniels has grown as a poet, he has grown as a fiction writer. The working class stories of No Pets have become the more diverse stories of Detroit Tales. Daniels characters in Detroit Tales are in complex and tough situations. These are not stories for those looking for sugary, uplifting fiction, though some of the stories do provide a flicker of redemption. Many of the stories center around characters who have lost someone, often to suicide. It befits a book set in and around Detroit, a city that often leaves its residents feeling as though they've lost something, something that died in the suicide that follows building an entire city around one industry. Daniels' characters, young or old, are always struggling with something that nearly anyone can connect with. His characters are up against bullies, bad neighborhoods, bad work situations, faltering marriages, and stifling lives. Although, some of his characters are more on the fringe. There's the Vietnam Veteran biker of "Renegade," the sexually confused twenty-something of "Middle of the Mitten" and the nearly adulterous minister of "The Jimmy Stewart Story". What I really like about Daniels stories is the fact that they don't seem like so many other stories I've been reading. I think MFA programs have done a disservice to fiction in this country. Stories are becoming faddish. Right now the fad seems to be to have characters so far on the fringe that nobody can connect with them. I don't see that in Daniels. Then again, he didn't come through an MFA program. He writes stories out of an innate instinct to write stories -- like writers did before there were MFA programs and writing workshops. As a result, his stories are a pleasure because they are so often surprising -- especially in their lack of overly crafted endings. Sometimes Daniels endings are so subtle that they seem more like life than anything else. Sometimes there are no great epiphanies or changes in character, just characters who are slightly altered, scarred or scared after what they've been through. It seems that Daniels understands life better than he understands the formula of short fiction which, in the end, makes his fiction so much better than most of the Mc-stories coming out of MFA programs.
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