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Double Falsehood: Third Series (Arden Shakespeare) ePub download

by William Shakespeare,Brean Hammond

  • Author: William Shakespeare,Brean Hammond
  • ISBN: 1903436761
  • ISBN13: 978-1903436769
  • ePub: 1890 kb | FB2: 1762 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Dramas & Plays
  • Publisher: Arden Shakespeare; 3 edition (May 17, 2010)
  • Pages: 400
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 287
  • Format: mobi lrf lrf lit
Double Falsehood: Third Series (Arden Shakespeare) ePub download

There have been three distinct series of the Arden Shakespeare over the past century, with the third series expected to be completed in 2020.

The Times (of London)

The Times (of London). The play's ‘bardic provenance' has been given fresh credibility by publishers Arden, who have included it in a new series of Shakespeare's work.

In March 2010, Arden Shakespeare published Double Falsehood, with a. .

Double Falsehood book Published May 1st 2010 by The Arden Shakespeare (first published March 1st 1727).

Double Falsehood book. Double Falsehood's plot is a version of the story of Cardenio found in Cervantes's Don Quixote (1605) as translated by Thomas Shelton, published in 1612 though in circulation earlier. Documentary records testify to the existence of a play, certainly performed in 1613, by John Fletcher and William Shakespeare, probably entitled The History of Cardenio and presumed to have been lost. Published May 1st 2010 by The Arden Shakespeare (first published March 1st 1727).

-Times (of London) Literary Supplement.

Presumably Shakespeare thought he would create this character, but then found, as he wrote the scene, that he had no need for he. Quite possibly Shakespeare was acquainted with a number of other versions.

Presumably Shakespeare thought he would create this character, but then found, as he wrote the scene, that he had no need for her. In all probability we have evidence here that the printer's copy was Shakespeare's manuscript, rather than a theatrical promptbook. Other bits of evidence tend to confirm this view that we are close to the author's table.

Either betray’d by falsehood of his guard, Or by his foe surpris’d at unawares: And, as I further have to understand

The arden shakespeare c.The Arden Shakespeare Complete Works, . 41. Either betray’d by falsehood of his guard, Or by his foe surpris’d at unawares: And, as I further have to understand

On the day Double Falsehood was published in the Arden Shakespeare series, Hammond was able to announce to listeners of the Radio 4 Today programme: I am relatively sure that some part of this play is Shakespeare’s work

On the day Double Falsehood was published in the Arden Shakespeare series, Hammond was able to announce to listeners of the Radio 4 Today programme: I am relatively sure that some part of this play is Shakespeare’s work.

Double Falsehood, in full Double Falsehood; or, The Distressed Lovers . At the same time, Hammond allows Double Falsehood to be a flawed play.

Double Falsehood, in full Double Falsehood; or, The Distressed Lovers, tragicomedy in five acts presented by Lewis Theobald at Drury Lane Theatre in 1727. According to Theobald, it was based on a lost play by William Shakespeare (and, scholars now believe, John Fletcher) called Cardenio.

Book by Shakespeare, William
INwhite
I don't for a minute believe this was actually written by the same Shakespeare who wrote the famous plays. I read it carefully, all the way through, including the critical materials. It just doesn't hold up in terms of language, quality of imagery, plot... This was perhaps a popular potboiler in its heyday, but Shakespeare? Not a chance.
Malhala
Interesting find--a possible new play of Shakespeare's.
Gamba
This is a good play that had a successful run at Drury Lane in 1728. In the following passage, the hero comments on his mistress's coolness toward him:

I do not see that fervour in the maid
Which youth and love should kindle. She consents,
As 'twere, to feed without an appetite;
Tells me she is content and plays the coy one,
Like those that subtly make their words their ward,
Keeping address at distance. This affection
Is such a feign'd one as will break untouched;
Die frosty ere it can be thawed; while mine,
Like to a clime beneath Hyperion's eye,
Burns with one constant heat.

If you like that, you'll probably like the show. Other reviewers have said the play is plainly not Shakespeare's. That's true. The theory is that Shakespeare and Fletcher did a play together, Fletcher doing most of the work, as in their other collaborations, THE TWO NOBLE KINSMEN and HENRY VIII. Later, that play was rewritten by Theobald, as he himself said. An excellent introduction of more than 100 pages lays out the whole theory and resulting modern controversy.

In other words, this play is an interesting find. It has become popular recently because many lines in it may be rewritten -- or even, possibly, untouched -- Shakespeare. But it's a good play in any case. Reviewers who say it's not are, I think, overly disappointed in its not seeming more Shakespearean than it does. Theobald, who did the rewrite, is one of England's first Shakespeare scholars, arguably the very first to take a modern approach to Shakespeare editing. That sound like reading a play by him would be fun, too. And it is.

Here's another passage. The hero's girl friend has said he should stop courting her, because his own father might not like her, and so be against her marrying his son. He replies,

O do not rack me with these ill-placed doubts,
Nor think though age has in my father's breast
Put out love's flame, he therefore has not eyes,
Or is in judgement blind. You wrong your beauties.
Venus will frown if you disprize her gifts
That have a face would make a frozen hermit
Leap from his cell and burn his beads to kiss it,
Eyes, that are nothing but continual births
Of new desires in those that view their beams.
You cannot have a cause to doubt.

The notes on this passage go thoroughly into how much seems to come from 1728 and how much resembles some of Shakespeare's phrasing. It's a game anyone can play and no one can win, but in any case the passage, I think, is charming.

I like the idea of reading a good, successful play from 1728 with four notes a page covering, among other things, how many passages might be rewritten Shakespeare or rewritten Fletcher, and how many are 1728 business as usual. I'm puzzled at anyone who would give such a pleasant read one star because it appears in the Arden Shakespeare. It's good stuff no matter where it appears.
Uylo
All Shakespearean scholars, like me, need to know this book and the arguments concerning its authorship. No one else need bother.
unmasked
It's just one man's opinion, but I do think there is some legit Shakespeare here, especially the first half of the play. Yes, it's watered down and edited a hundred years after the fact, but the seed is buried here.

To me, half a dollar is better than no money at all. Well worth checking out!

PS- the story itself is very intriguing: echoes of Comedy of Errors abound. It held my interest all the way to the end.
Ytli
Here's Sky News on the modern professional première
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_wIzMdxhqY
Siratius
Never wise to be hasty in passing judgment... it appears that research shows a significant portion of this play was indeed written by Shakespeare (the Earl of Oxford of course, but that's another matter all together). Here's the recent finding about Double Falsehood:
http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/10/entertainment/shakespeare-play-double-falsehood-feat/index.html
This is not a review of the play itself, which Lewis Theobald honestly and rightfully claimed as his adaptation of Cardenio by John Fletcher and William Shakespeare. The play itself is well done and Theobald deserves praise for it. This is, instead, a firm criticism of Arden marketing this version of the play as being written by William Shakespeare. It is a disappointment to see them use Shakespeare's name to draw sales in this way.

When one looks deeper at the information, then you realize that this is not Shakespeare's own work, though it is derived from it. But at first glance, Arden, and Amazon in turn, puts the claim right out there to scoop up customers. Truly a Double Falsehood. And a disappointment.
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