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The Fortunes of Richard Mahony ePub download

by Henry Handel Richardson

  • Author: Henry Handel Richardson
  • ISBN: 0140061398
  • ISBN13: 978-0140061390
  • ePub: 1553 kb | FB2: 1639 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Dramas & Plays
  • Publisher: PENGUIN BOOKS AUSTRALIA; New Ed edition (January 27, 1983)
  • Pages: 844
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 305
  • Format: docx txt txt lrf
The Fortunes of Richard Mahony ePub download

The Fortunes of Richard Mahony is a three-part novel by Australian writer Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson under her pen name, Henry Handel Richardson.

The Fortunes of Richard Mahony is a three-part novel by Australian writer Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson under her pen name, Henry Handel Richardson. It consists of Australia Felix (1917), The Way Home (1925), and Ultima Thule (1929). It was collected in 1930 under the title by which it is now best known.

Henry Handel Richardson died in Sussex in 1946. PETER CRAVEN is one of Australia’s best-known literary critics. Also by henry handel richardson. Cover design by WH Chong. Page design by WH Chong & Susan Miller.

Fortunes of Richard Mahony book. But Richardson managed to make them two parts of one massive book, The Fortunes of Richard Mahony. Sadly, Richardson's major novel is not as great as that by those men and women, but 'Richard Mahony' is, I'm fairly sure, unique in world literature. The first volume, 'Australia Felix,' starts out with an astonishing 'proem,' an almost grotesque visual sequence in which men are witchcraft" by the "unholy hunger" for gold.

Henry Handel Richardson. Boook I australia felix. This was more than Mahony could stomach

Henry Handel Richardson. This was more than Mahony could stomach. Flashing up from his seat, he strove to assert himself above the hum of agreement that mounted from the foreign contingent, and the doubtful sort of grumble by which the Britisher signifies his disapproval.

Henry Handel Richardson was born in Melbourne in 1870. She published her first novel, Maurice Guest, in 1908, followed by the trilogy that would become The Fortunes of Richard Mahony. She was was sent to board at the Presbyterian Ladies College in 1883-an experience that provided material for her novel The Getting of Wisdom. Her final novel The Young Cosima appeared in 1939. Peter Craven is one of Australia's best-known literary critics.

author: Henry Handel Richardson d. ate. scanningcentre: IIIT, Allahabad d. escription. main: 1 d. tagged: 0 d. totalpages: 970 d. ormat. iso: English d. ublisher: London William Heinemann Ltd d. ights: In Public Domain d. ource. library: University Of Allahabad d. ubject. classification: Literature d. itle: The Fortunes Of Richard Mahony.

Henry Handel Richardson's great literary achievement, comprising the novels Australia Felix, The .

Henry Handel Richardson's great literary achievement, comprising the novels Australia Felix, The Way Home and Ultima Thule, weaves together many themes. His restlessness is not understood by Mary, who has to endure the constant shattering of her security as Richard desperately attempts to free himself; his attempts finally plunge them into poverty.

Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson

93000" Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson

Richardson was born in East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia into a prosperous family which . The book is set in mid 1800s Ballarat, Australia

Richardson was born in East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia into a prosperous family which later fell on hard times, Ethel Florence?was the elder daughter of Walter Lindesay Richardson? M. and his wife Mary (n?e Bailey). This epic follows the fortunes of Richard Mahony from his days as store-owner on the 1854 Ballarat Gold Fields to his prosperous career as a rich and famous doctor to his gradual mental disintegration and death. The book is set in mid 1800s Ballarat, Australia. The eponymous character is - at the start - in his late 20s, an Irish doctor who has come out to seek his fortune, and has abandoned his profession to run a - not particularly successful - store.

Mahony's fortunes become so great that he lives on occasional consulting to the . Richardson, Henry Handel. The Fortunes of Richard Mahony".

Mahony's fortunes become so great that he lives on occasional consulting to the hospital and can afford all the books he has ever desired. Mary can never respect his wishes not to be disturbed, never getting past the point of view that books are to pass the time, not essential mental exercise as they are to Richard. She is displeased that he becomes unsociable, yet he does go out on occasion.

Danskyleyn
If the characters were not so well done and did not develop so well over the book, you might call this book a high class soap...

Set before and after the Eureka Stockade (Australia's "Boston Tea Party" moment), this book tells the first part of the story of Dr Richard Mahoney and his wife Polly/Mary.

I can't wait to read the other two volumes of The Fortunes of Richard Mahony -- truly an Australian classic!
Fek
An Australian classic. The profoundly moving story of man who, at huge cost to his wife and later family, continually seeks to change his surroundings without succeeding in changing himself - a common human dilemma. Its historical context is also richly drawn. A must for all serious readers not just of Australian literature.
Yanki
kind of a boring plot, although the descriptions of the landscape were enjoyable. I didn't care enough about the characters to finish it.
Tejora
This is the greatest Australian novel. Period. I believe Phillip Adams has been trying for many years to get it made into a movie. Do it Phillip!
Milleynti
The book is set in mid 1800s Ballarat, Australia. The eponymous character is - at the start - in his late 20s, an Irish doctor who has come out to seek his fortune, and has abandoned his profession to run a - not particularly successful - store.
Matrimony comes quite early on when he marries the much younger Mary. Her gentle encouragement prompts him to resume his medical career and gradually they move up in the world. Yet his life is never his own, with her friends and family coming to stay or needing help. And while loving, Mary fails to fully understand her husband:
'He had no talent for friendship, and he knew it; indeed, he would even invert the thing, and say bluntly that his nature had a twist in it which directly hindered friendship...Sometimes he felt like a hungry man looking on at a banquet, of which no one invited him to partake because he had already given it to be understood that he would decline.'
In the ensuing volumes, we see him finding great success. But life goes horribly wrong and Mary has to step up and take the reins... I particularly liked the way that the final volume is written in part from the viewpoint of their young son, Cuffy, and how his feelings and behaviour are shaped by being moved from pillar to post and having a Papa of whom he is ashamed.
Absolutely wonderful read that deserves to be better known.
Wonderful characterization and descriptions of Australian life at this time for both the haves and have-nots. Although written in 1917, I found the style very much of the Victorian era in which the book is set. Deserves to be much more famous than it is.
Dobpota
First and longest volume of Richardson's 'Fortunes of Richard Mahony' trilogy.
The book is set in mid 1800s Ballarat, Australia. The eponymous character is in his late 20s, an Irish doctor who has come out to seek his fortune, and has abandoned his profession to run a - not particularly successful - store.
Matrimony comes quite early on when he marries the much younger Mary. Her gentle encouragement prompts him to resume his medical career and gradually they move up in the world. Yet his life is never his own, with her friends and family coming to stay or needing help. And while loving, Mary fails to fully understand her husband:
'He had no talent for friendship, and he knew it; indeed, he would even invert the thing, and say bluntly that his nature had a twist in it which directly hindered friendship...Sometimes he felt like a hungry man looking on at a banquet, of which no one invited him to partake because he had already given it to be understood that he would decline.'
Wonderful characterization and descriptions of Australian life at this time for both the haves and have-nots. Although written in 1917, I found the style very much of the Victorian era in which the book is set. Deserves to be much more famous than it is.
LivingCross
"The Fortunes of Richard Mahoney" is actually a single-volume compilation of three separate novels by the Australian writer H.H. Richardson (a nom de plume of its female author.) The individual novels were published between the two wars and the last of the three, "Ultima Thule," achieved a mild, and certainly brief, popularity in the United States.

H.H. Richardson is known in America, if at all, for her short novel, "The Getting of Wisdom" which, some years ago, was made into a well-reviewed motion picture. Australian literature is little known in America, except perhaps for Patrick White ("The Tree Where Man Was Born") and Richardson's novels -- except for "The Getting of Wisdom" -- are unavailable in this country. Perhaps, for all I know, they are no longer in print in Australia.

"The Fortunes of Richard Mahoney" is a long work -- in excess of one-thousand pages -- and it proceeds slowly. It is set in the Australian goldfields of the mid-Victorian period, a time that resembled America's Wild West in many ways: raw, manly, dangerous and with money to be made for the right sort.

The plot weaves in and out of Mahoney's adventures as a frontier doctor and prospector for gold. The character of his wife is just as important as Mahoney's and certainly a lot more sympathetic. The details of these adventures are mildly interesting; but not enough so as to make it worth the reader's while to stay with them for a thousand pages.

The real brilliance of these novels -- and it is brilliance -- lies in its portrayal of the psychological disintegration of a human personality. And, here, the reader must admire most the author's self-discipline: nothing is rushed, nothing is anticipated, and everything is utterly believable when seen in retrospect. The author is almost sadistic as she patiently adds an incident here or a detail there that, taken altogether, document the decomposition of a human being. The reader, almost without knowing it, follows Mahoney's descent into the Pit, page by page. One is a bit bored, at first, by the slow pace of the writing; then one's interest is piqued as the main character increasingly begins to wobble off-center; and, finally, one watches Mahoney's ghastly end with horror.

I doubt that in America a dozen people a year -- if that -- read this novel. It deserves a wider audience, although it will never find one. Its account of the rotting away of one man's character and personality moves too slowly to ever make it popular. But, it is, all the same, beautifully controlled and convincing literature.
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