» » Rise and Fall of the City of Mahogany

Rise and Fall of the City of Mahogany ePub download

by Bertolt Brecht

  • Author: Bertolt Brecht
  • ISBN: 0195402480
  • ISBN13: 978-0195402483
  • ePub: 1456 kb | FB2: 1216 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Dramas & Plays
  • Publisher: Oxford Univ Press; First Edition edition (1975)
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 528
  • Format: lrf rtf docx txt
Rise and Fall of the City of Mahogany ePub download

Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (German: Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny) is a political-satirical opera composed by Kurt Weill to a German libretto by Bertolt Brecht.

Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (German: Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny) is a political-satirical opera composed by Kurt Weill to a German libretto by Bertolt Brecht. It was first performed on 9 March 1930 at the Neues Theater in Leipzig. Weill was asked by the 1927 Baden-Baden music festival committee to write a one act chamber opera for the festival.

Bertolt Brecht (born Eugen Berthold Friedrich Brecht) was a German poet, playwright, and theatre director. During the war years, Brecht became a prominent writer of the Exilliteratur. He expressed his opposition to the National Socialist and Fascist movements in his most famous plays. Books by Bertolt Brecht.

Brecht's operatic play produced with Hauptmann, Neher and Weill was first staged in 1930 Listen Playing.

Brecht's operatic play produced with Hauptmann, Neher and Weill was first staged in 1930. The story is that three criminals create the city of Mahagonny. Similar authors to follow.

In each, one sister is tempted by one of the seven deadly sins

In each, one sister is tempted by one of the seven deadly sins. First performed in Paris and London in 1933, with music by Weill and choreography by George Balanchine, it premiered in the United States in 1958 in a production by Balanchine. Of the translations by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman that are reprinted here, Hannah Arendt wrote in 1960 that she knew of "no other adequate rendering of Brecht into English.

Brecht's most ambitious venture in verse drama, Saint Joan of the Stockyards (1933), was written in Germany shortly before Hitler . Brecht is considered a playwright who saw the stage as a platform for the presentation of a message

Brecht's most ambitious venture in verse drama, Saint Joan of the Stockyards (1933), was written in Germany shortly before Hitler came to power. Brecht left his homeland in 1993. Brecht is considered a playwright who saw the stage as a platform for the presentation of a message. His aim was to transform the state from a place of entertainment to a place for instruction and public communication. He called himself an epic realist. In 1947, Brecht was summoned to Washington, . by the on Un-American Activities Committee, before which he testified.

Published by Oxford Univ Press.

Rise and Fall of the City of Mahogany. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Rise and Fall of the City of Mahogany from your list? Rise and Fall of the City of Mahogany. Published by Oxford Univ Press.

The two works collected in this volume sprang from the same fruitful collaboration that gave rise to Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's Threepenny Opera. Both are set in America, but an America of myth

The two works collected in this volume sprang from the same fruitful collaboration that gave rise to Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's Threepenny Opera. Both are set in America, but an America of myth. In The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny, Brecht's parable of greed and indifference, Mahagonny is a boom-town fusing Miami with Sodom and Gomorrah.

A satirical, somewhat minimalist anti-Nazi opera by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill (authors of The Threepenny Opera). Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny (The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny) was first performed in 1930, though a concept version, Mahagonny-Songspiel, had been presented three years earlier. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Blackstalker
As a satire of capitalist societies, it's not subtle at all. But still it struck me as amusing and clever, even though I am far from sharing Brecht’s Marxist views, which he apparently already held, though somewhat unconsciously, when he wrote the text.

Mahagonny is a city in the United States run by gangsters. All that matters there is money. Life evolves around spending it for worldly pleasures or receiving it for all kinds of services. As we might expect from such a place, everything is for sale, including love and the authorities. If we think of the epoch it was written – the late twenties, when Al Capone was at his peak – Brecht’s critique may perhaps be taken a good deal seriously.

The play cannot be fully appreciated only by reading the text. As with all plays, the actors’ performances and the director’s hand matter a lot. I watched a Royal Opera House’s version in 2015 (unfortunately not alive, but at a Cinemark in my city). In this version, we see Brecht’s "distancing effect" vividly present in several scenes, like one in which the prostitute Jenny sings a romantic song while the very actress who is singing changes clothes and makeup, with all the attention focused on her, of course. This is typical Brecht. It makes impossible for the audience to forget reality and dive into the story, as is a major goal of most fictional works. Instead, the spectator is forced to retain a critical perspective by being constantly reminded that those on the stage are only actors.

But in the case of an opera (or would it be a satire of an opera?) there is also the music, and here the partnership between Brecht and the composer Kurt Weill worked fantastically. It was their intention to achieve a sharp contrast between the feeling conveyed by the melodies and the ideas conveyed by the lyrics, so sharp as to produce a comic effect. This is particularly noticeable when the people of Mahagonny sing a lofty song, one that sounds really fit for praising human glories, but with these words, wicked to the point of being ridiculous: “So get kicked in the face if you want to / As for me, I will much rather kick” (if you want to listen, search for the teaser from Royal Opera House on Youtube. It contains part of the song).
Mr_NiCkNaMe
I must admit I am a Brecht fan boy. "The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny" was on my to read list for a long time. However, I was having trouble finding it. So when I saw it a used bookstore I snapped it up and read it immediatly. I was not disapointed. "The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny" revists many of the themes Brecht first explored in "The Three Penny Opera". He explores the relationship between morality and poverty in our consumer focused capitalist society. Although written some half century ago it is still relevant today. I don't want to make it sound like a polemic. The plot, charachters and absurd yet real situations draw us in. While less known that "Mother Courages" and "The Three Penny Opera" -- likely because it sacrifices entertainment for clear and bitting politics -- "The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny" deserves just as much respect.
E-Books Related to Rise and Fall of the City of Mahogany: