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The Housekeeper and the Professor ePub download

by Yoko Ogawa,Stephen Snyder

  • Author: Yoko Ogawa,Stephen Snyder
  • ISBN: 0312427808
  • ISBN13: 978-0312427801
  • ePub: 1380 kb | FB2: 1575 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Contemporary
  • Publisher: Picador; First edition (February 3, 2009)
  • Pages: 192
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 509
  • Format: lrf docx lrf rtf
The Housekeeper and the Professor ePub download

by Yoko Ogawa (Author), Stephen Snyder (Translator). The housekeeper has a 10-year old son, and even though the Professor's card at her agency has many marks from previous housekeepers, she finds that the job is quite to her liking.

by Yoko Ogawa (Author), Stephen Snyder (Translator). The Professor lights up when he talks about math, and he is able to show her the beauty of many mathematical concepts when he makes connections for her with math in real life.

Chapter 11. Yoko Ogawa. In the Professor's case, it only took a glance at his client card to know that he might be trouble

Chapter 11. The Housekeeper and. the Professor. In the Professor's case, it only took a glance at his client card to know that he might be trouble. When I went for my interview, I was greeted by a slender, elegant old woman with dyed brown hair swept up in a bun.

Yōko Ogawa, Stephen Snyder (Translator)

Yōko Ogawa, Stephen Snyder (Translator). And every morning, as the Professor and the Housekeeper are introduced to each other anew, a strange and beautiful relationship blossoms between them. Though he cannot hold memories for long (his brain is like a tape that begins to erase itself every eighty minutes), the Professor’s mind is still alive with elegant equations from the past. Toward the end of Ogawa's book she has the Professor write a formula as a insistent communication to his sister-in-law: This formula is known as Euler's Identity after the 18th century Swiss mathematician. It has been called the most beautiful formula in mathematics.

Or the housekeeper’s birthday, Feb. 20 - 220 - which turns out to be amicable with the number 284, which is engraved on the back of a watch he was given in college as a. .Translated by Stephen Snyder.

Continue reading the main story. When he discovers, over and over again, that the housekeeper has a young son, the professor becomes fiercely tender and demands that she bring him to the cottage so he won’t be alone after school. He adds a picture of the boy to the note he keeps pinned to himself to remind him of his new housekeeper.

The Housekeeper and the Professor (博士の愛した数式, hakase no ai shita suushiki) (literally "The Professor's Beloved Equation") is a novel by Yōko Ogawa set in modern-day Japan. It was published in August 2003, by Shinchosha and was the first recipient of the Hon'ya Taisho award (Japan Booksellers Award)

Each morning, as the Professor and the Housekeeper are reintroduced to one another, a strange, beautiful relationship blossoms between them.

Each morning, as the Professor and the Housekeeper are reintroduced to one another, a strange, beautiful relationship blossoms between them. The Professor may not remember what he had for breakfast, but his mind is still alive with elegant equations from the past. He is a brilliant maths professor with a peculiar problem - ever since a traumatic head injury seventeen years ago, he has lived with only eighty minutes of short-term memory. She is a sensitive but astute young housekeeper who is entrusted to take care of him. Each morning, as the Professor and the Housekeeper are reintroduced to one another, a strange, beautiful relationship blossoms between them.

Housekeeper and The Professor - Yōko Ogawa (Stephen Snyder, trans. Reading Habits Book Tag - Продолжительность: 9:57 Shawn The Book Maniac Recommended for you.

The Housekeeper and The Professor - Yōko Ogawa (Stephen Snyder, trans. I'm nmooney on Litsy and on Twitter. Friday Reads: Bibliomanic Fortunes - Продолжительность: 11:20 Shawn The Book Maniac Recommended for you. 11:20.

About This Book In The Housekeeper and the Professor, Yoko Ogawa tells an intimate story about family, the nature of.The New Yorker - Stephen Snyder. Here, despite some touching scenes, the relationship never builds to any great revelations. ShelfAwareness - Nick DiMartino.

About This Book In The Housekeeper and the Professor, Yoko Ogawa tells an intimate story about family, the nature of memory, and the poetry of mathematics. It is also, in a sense, a story about the simple experience of getting to know someone, but with a twist: the person forgets everything in eighty minutes.

Yoko Ogawa's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, A Public Space, and Zoetrope. Her books include The Housekeeper and the Professor, Revenge, and The Diving Pool.

brings a delicate and precise hand to the translation. Ogawa's disarming exploration of an eccentric relationship reads like a fable, one that deftly balances whimsy with heartache. Yoko Ogawa's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, A Public Space, and Zoetrope. Since 1988 she has published more than twenty works of fiction and nonfiction, and has won every major Japanese literary award.

by Yoko Ogawa & translated by Stephen Snyder. Trouble calls, though, when the sister-in-law, who has her own complicated history with the professor, misinterprets the housekeeper’s kindness as something more devious. Ogawa’s disarming exploration of an eccentric relationship reads like a fable, one that deftly balances whimsy with heartache. Simple story, well told.

He is a brilliant math Professor with a peculiar problem―ever since a traumatic head injury, he has lived with only eighty minutes of short-term memory. She is an astute young Housekeeper―with a ten-year-old son―who is hired to care for the Professor. And every morning, as the Professor and the Housekeeper are introduced to each other anew, a strange and beautiful relationship blossoms between them. Though he cannot hold memories for long (his brain is like a tape that begins to erase itself every eighty minutes), the Professor's mind is still alive with elegant equations from the past. And the numbers, in all of their articulate order, reveal a sheltering and poetic world to both the Housekeeper and her young son. The Professor is capable of discovering connections between the simplest of quantities―like the Housekeeper's shoe size―and the universe at large, drawing their lives ever closer and more profoundly together, even as his memory slips away. Yoko Ogawa's The Housekeeper and the Professor is an enchanting story about what it means to live in the present, and about the curious equations that can create a family.

GawelleN
Told from the housekeeper’s perspective, this novel starts with the introduction of a brilliant math professor to his new housekeeper. Due to an accident, the professor’s memories reset every eighty minutes. When we meet him, he is covered in sticky notes that remind him of who people are and where he has placed things. He has been through a number of other housekeepers already and is considered difficult. The housekeeper, a single mother, has a ten-year-old son who the professor names Root, as the hair on the top of his head reminds the professor of a square root symbol. Except for the nickname Root, these characters remain nameless. The novel focuses on the interactions between these three characters.

I found the math tidbits, like amicable numbers, shared by the professor to be interesting. I was not aware of many of them, so that was a plus and I used those facts to initiate conversations with my husband who was also a math major. The professor’s mind for numbers never failed him (even as his memory for other things did) and when forced to, this is the way he interacts with those around him and the world. The housekeeper, while insecure about her knowledge of even basic math, is intrigued by the math questions/beauty that the professor presents. She is unafraid of a challenge and is determined to apply herself and do her best in all situations.

The novel’s main theme revolves around family, especially the unlikely ways in which we create our own family. The professor was portrayed as the consummate professor – patient, inspiring, questioning, encouraging, and challenging to both Root and the housekeeper. His relationship with Root was tender and charming, as he became a surrogate grandfather to him. The housekeeper becomes more than a housekeeper as she is the professor’s main caretaker. The three of them create an unconventional family with their own rhythms and traditions.

With this being an intergenerational relationship novel about a brilliant math teacher plus the intriguing memory premise, it should have been a home run for me. Unfortunately, that was not the case. Despite its certain strengths, I did not like this story. The pace was too slow, the relationships were too sweet and even the tragic circumstances surrounding the characters could not mitigate that. Even though the novel was set in modern day Japan, I did not get a sense of the culture or place. The novel could have been set in Middle-America and not lost or gained anything. Ultimately, I was disappointed by this novel and would not recommend it to others.
Kamuro
Yoko Ogawa's "The Housekeeper and the Professor" (2007) is a short novel that combines broad themes of reason and poetry with an exploration of the intimacy of family. Set in contemporary Japan, the book features three nameless characters and their relationships. The growing personal relationship among the characters is threaded in with the broader, eternal relationships that pervade reality, as seen in this novel, through mathematics.

A young woman in her thirties narrates the story. With little education, she has a humble job as a housekeeper which enables her to support herself and her ten-year old son. The housekeeper is given the assignment to work for a mathematician, 64, a former professor who lives in a small cottage near the much larger home of his sister-in-law. As a result of an automobile accident some 17 years earlier, the professor's short-term memory is limited to 80 minutes. After that time, his short-term memory is erased and begins from scratch all over again. The professor's deep, long-term memory of mathematics remains intact and unscathed by his loss of short-term memory.

The story shows the developing relationship that begins when the housekeeper is hired to provide care required by the professor's limitations of memory. The housekeeper is to provide simple cleaning and cooking, no more no less. Gradually a close familial relationship develops among the housekeeper, professor, and boy and expands to include the professor's sister-in-law. One of the keys to the developing relationship is mathematics. The professor introduces both the housekeeper and the son to the intricacies of mathematics involving square roots (the young boy is given the nickname "Root"), factors, and imaginary numbers. The professor is especially enamored of prime numbers and their properties. The mathematical discussions of the book culminate in a way that manages to be novelistically effective with a consideration of Euler's theorem. The intricacies of this difficult theory are used in the book to suggest the underlying unity of all reality as well as the unity of human relationships. The professor is a gifted teacher who allows his companions to discover and to appreciate mathematical truths for themselves, as Socrates does with the young boy in Plato's dialogue "Meno". There are indeed strong Platonic overtones in this short novel.

Mathematics also plays a role in this family story in the love that both the professor and Root share for baseball, probably the most statistically driven of sports. Baseball is loved in Japan, the United States, and many other countries. This book includes moving scenes of the little family growing closer through love of the game. For all his knowledge of the statistics of the game, the professor attends a baseball game for the first time in an important scene of this book. He learns something of the world of fact beyond the extensive statistical lore of baseball.

Mathematics is shown in this book as both reason and poetry. The book suggests that mathematics is an underlying key to reality and to truth beyond the world of appearances and differences -- a highly Platonic, spiritual, and controversial view. Reason and imagination are also shown as the unifying factors that unite people and that help to create love.

This book has a great deal of depth for a short novel. It is also enchanting and deceptively simple to read. I learned a great deal from several of the reader reviews which brought me to this work. "The Housekeeper and the Professor" will appeal to readers with a strong philosophical bent.

Robin Friedman
Felhalar
Elegant, serene, and spare novel about how kindness and accommodation make a family out of three lonely people in modern Japan. Ogawa puts words on a page with nary a misstep as naturally as walkers put one foot in front of the other. This reader felt only a sense of regret when I closed the book and left the peace, humanity, and grace that I'd shared living beside the Housekeeper, the Professor, and 10-year-old Root.

Ogawa seamlessly melds number theory, relationships, and baseball into a story of encompassing love that shelters a math genius left with only 80 minutes of short term memory, his tireless and generous housekeeper, and her Japan Tigers-loving son. In assured straight-forward prose, the author soon has three characters with seemingly nothing in common discovering that their lives mesh. Each of them have gifts of understanding and compassion, of pupil and teacher, of caregiver and recipient that make them stronger individually and as a "family." Together they embody the beauty of triangular numbers.
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